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  1.  4
    Punishing Survivors and Criminalizing Survivorship: A Feminist Intersectional Approach to Migrant Justice in the Crimmigration System.Salina Abji - 2020 - Studies in Social Justice 2020 (14):67-89.
    Scholars have identified crimmigration – or the criminalization of “irregular” migration in law – as a key issue affecting migrant access to justice in contemporary immigrant-receiving societies. Yet the gendered and racialized implications of crimmigration for diverse migrant populations remains underdeveloped in this literature. This study advances a feminist intersectional approach to crimmigration and migrant justice in Canada. I add to recent research showing how punitive immigration controls disproportionately affect racialized men from the global south, constituting what Golash-Boza and Hondagneu-Sotelo (...)
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  2.  1
    You Are an Immigrant Too / You Would Leave Too.Moozhan Ahmadzadegan - 2020 - Studies in Social Justice 2020 (14):228-230.
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  3.  4
    Organizing the 1%: How Corporate Power Works.Sean Field - 2020 - Studies in Social Justice 2020 (14):235-240.
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  4.  3
    Negotiated Precarity in the Global South: A Case Study of Migration and Domestic Work in South Africa.Zaheera Jinnah - 2020 - Studies in Social Justice 2020 (14):210-227.
    This article explores precarity as a conceptual framework to understand the intersection of migration and low-waged work in the global south. Using a case study of cross-border migrant domestic workers in South Africa, I discuss current debates on framing and understanding precarity, especially in the global south, and test its use as a conceptual framework to understand the everyday lived experiences and strategies of a group that face multiple forms of exclusion and vulnerability. I argue that a form of negotiated (...)
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  5.  1
    “Fake” or “Real” Marriage? Gender, Age, “Race” and Class in the Construction of Un/Desirability of Marriage Migrants in South Korea.Jiyoung Lee-An - 2020 - Studies in Social Justice 2020 (14):125-145.
    This paper examines the link between the regulation of marriage migration and national boundary-making processes in South Korea through the analysis of “fraudulent marriage” discourses. Corresponding to the goals of the Korean government based on the gendered and racialized construction of the Korean nation, populations of marriage migrants are hierarchized according to various intersecting axes of gender, age, class, and “race.” Based on a critical race and intersectional feminist framework and critical security studies, I examine multiple intersections of the social (...)
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  6.  3
    The Invisible Women: Migrant and Immigrant Sex Workers and Law Reform in Canada.Jamie Chai Yun Liew - 2020 - Studies in Social Justice 2020 (14):90-116.
    This article examines how migrant and immigrant sex workers have been rendered invisible before the courts and parliament in the reform of laws regarding sex work in Canada. A discourse analysis of the expansive legal record in the Bedford case and the transcripts of Parliamentary debates and testimony before Standing Committees confirm the lack of nuanced discussion on how criminal law reform could impact migrant and immigrant sex workers. As such, while the case of Bedford and the resulting change in (...)
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  7.  2
    Unequal Interdependency: Chinese Petty Entrepreneurs and Zimbabwean Migrant Labourers.Ying-Ying Tiffany Liu - 2020 - Studies in Social Justice 2020 (14):146-165.
    Exploring the cultural politics of diasporic entrepreneurs and migrant labourers through an examination of Chinese restaurants in Johannesburg, this article presents what I call the “intra-migrant economy” amid everyday racialized insecurities in urban South Africa. I use the term “intra-migrant economy” to refer to the employment of one group of migrants by another group of migrants as an economic strategy outside the mainstream labour market. These two groups of migrants work in the same industry, live in the same city, and (...)
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  8.  1
    The Migrant Nurse Dilemma.Duduzile Sakhelene Ndlovu - 2020 - Studies in Social Justice 2020 (14):166-168.
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  9.  4
    Performing Nanay in Winnipeg: Filipino Labour Migration to Canada.Geraldine Pratt, Sarah Zell, Caleb Johnston & Hazel Venzon - 2020 - Studies in Social Justice 2020 (14):55-66.
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  10.  3
    The Kids Are in Charge: Activism and Power in Peru’s Movement of Working Children.Rebecca Raby - 2020 - Studies in Social Justice 2020 (14):231-234.
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  11.  2
    Nervous Conditions on the Limpopo: Gendered Insecurities, Livelihoods, and Zimbabwean Migrants in Northern South Africa.Blair Rutherford - 2020 - Studies in Social Justice 2020 (14):169-187.
    This paper examines some of the gendered insecurities informing some of the livelihood practices of Zimbabwean migrants in northern South Africa from 2004-2011, the period in which I carried out almost annual ethnographic research in this region. Situating these practices within wider policy shifts and changing migration patterns at the national and local scales, this paper shows the importance of attending to gendered dependencies and insecurities when analysing migrant livelihoods in southern Africa. These include those found within humanitarian organizations targeting (...)
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  12.  8
    Migration, Intersectionality and Social Justice.Daiva Stasiulis, Zaheera Jinnah & Blair Rutherford - 2020 - Studies in Social Justice 2020 (14):1-21.
    This article utilizes the lens of disposability to explore recent conditions of low-wage temporary migrant labour, whose numbers and economic sectors have expanded in the 21stcentury. A central argument is that disposability is a discursive and material relation of power that creates and reproduces invidious distinctions between the value of “legitimate” Canadian settler-citizens and the lack of worth of undesirable migrant populations working in Canada, often for protracted periods of time. The analytical lens of migrant disposability draws upon theorizing within (...)
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  13.  2
    Migration in Performance: Crossing the Colonial Present.Jessie Stein - 2020 - Studies in Social Justice 2020 (14):241-245.
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  14.  3
    A Creative Storytelling Project with Women Migrants in Johannesburg, South Africa.Rebecca Walker & Elsa Oliveira - 2020 - Studies in Social Justice 2020 (14):188-209.
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  15.  1
    Is It Resolved? One Story of Academic Contrapower Harassment and Cyberbullying. Anonymous - 2020 - Studies in Social Justice 13 (2):322-331.
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