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  1. Interview with David Bobier.David Bobier & Esther Ignagni - 2021 - Studies in Social Justice 15 (2):282-287.
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  2. Blind Visuality in Bruce Horak’s "Through a Tired Eye".Mary Bunch - 2021 - Studies in Social Justice 15 (2):239-258.
    This article proposes the concept of blind visuality as a response to the injunction to look differently at both visual images, and vision itself, posed by Bruce Horak’s exhibition Through a Tired Eye. The brightly colored impressionistic paintings suggest an artist who revels in the domain of the visual, yet he describes his practice as a representation of blindness. This accessible exposition of blind visuality speaks to the broad question of what critical disability arts contribute to discourses about vision, visuality (...)
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  3.  1
    Cripistemologies of Disability Arts and Culture: Reflections on the Cripping the Arts Symposium.Eliza Chandler, Katie Aubrecht, Esther Ignagni & Carla Rice - 2021 - Studies in Social Justice 15 (2):170-179.
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  4.  1
    Communicating Access, Accessing Communication.Eliza Chandler, Esther Ignagni & Kimberlee Collins - 2021 - Studies in Social Justice 15 (2):230-238.
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  5. Disability and Deaf Futures.Taeyoon Choi, Aaron Labbe, Annie Segarra, Elizabeth Sweeney & Syrus Marcus Ware - 2021 - Studies in Social Justice 15 (2):334-343.
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  6.  1
    Finding Language: A Word Scavenger Hunt.Vanessa Dion Fletcher & Max Ferguson - 2021 - Studies in Social Justice 15 (2):180-183.
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  7.  1
    Neurodivergency and Interdependent Creation: Breaking Into Canadian Disability Arts.Becky Gold - 2021 - Studies in Social Justice 15 (2):209-229.
    Disability arts has traditionally been understood as that which is led, created, and/or curated by disabled artists. While disability arts and culture in Canada has continued to grow and develop over the last number of decades, I have perceived a notable lack of neurodivergent artists being included at disability arts events and community gatherings. I question if this lack of representation may be due in part to this perception of disability arts as having to be led exclusively by those with (...)
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  8.  1
    Representing Disability, D/Deaf, and Mad Artists and Art in Journalism: Identifying Ableist Fault Lines and Promising Crip Practices of Representation.Chelsea Jones, Nadine Changfoot & Kirsty Johnston - 2021 - Studies in Social Justice 15 (2):307-333.
    This paper revisits the dynamic discussion about journalism’s role in representing and amplifying disability arts at the 2019 Cripping the Arts Symposium. Chronicling the dialogue of the “Representation” panel which included artists, arts and culture critics, journalists, and scholars, it reveals how arts and culture coverage contributes to the cultivation of disability, D/deaf, and mad art. Given that the relationship between journalism and disability communities continues to be fractured in Canada, speakers were invited to reflect on journalism and disability arts (...)
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  9. Beyond Measure? Disability Art, Affect and Reimagining Visitor Experience.Christine Kelly & Michael Orsini - 2021 - Studies in Social Justice 15 (2):288-306.
    Disability, mad and d/Deaf arts are motivated to transform the arts sector and beyond in ways that foreground differing embodiments. But how do we know if such arts-based interventions are actually disrupting conventional ways of experiencing and consuming art? This article presents three themes from a critical literature review relevant to curating and creating artwork meant to spur social change related to non-normative bodies. We highlight examples that push beyond standard survey measurement techniques, such as talk-back walls and guided tours (...)
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  10.  1
    Letting Bodies Be Bodies: Exploring Relaxed Performance in the Canadian Performance Landscape.Andrea LaMarre, Carla Rice & Kayla Besse - 2021 - Studies in Social Justice 15 (2):184-208.
    There is an increasing movement toward accessibility in arts spaces, including recent legislative changes and commitments at individual, organizational, and systemic levels to integrating access into the arts across Canada. In this article, we explore Relaxed Performance in the context of this movement. We present the results of a reflexive thematic analysis of interviews conducted with participants who completed RP training offered by the British Council to. understand the training’s effectiveness and impact. We explore the significance of the training, and (...)
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  11. Reflexive Sketches During the Cripping the Arts Symposium.Jenelle Rouse - 2021 - Studies in Social Justice 15 (2):259-264.
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  12.  1
    Stitching Language: Sounding Voice in the Art Practice of Vanessa Dion Fletcher.Stephanie Springgay - 2021 - Studies in Social Justice 15 (2):265-281.
    This paper engages with the artistic practice and work of Vanessa Dion Fletcher from my perspective as a non-Indigenous academic and curator. Dion Fletcher and I have worked together over the past several years through discussions about her work, studio visits, and various events. In her art practice, Dion Fletcher uses porcupine quills and menstrual blood to inquire into a range of issues and concepts including Indigenous language revitalization, feminist Indigenous corporeality, Land as pedagogy, decolonization, and neurodiversity. In particular her (...)
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  13. Examining Gender and Resistance with Filipina Hong Kongers Through Cellphilm Production and Collaborative Writing.Casey Burkholder, Jianne Soriano & Alecxis Ramos-Pakit - 2021 - Studies in Social Justice 15 (1):25-42.
    Hong Kong’s non-white ethnic minorities – including its Filipina residents – are often described in media and policy discourses as a unified group. Speaking back to this misconception, in this article we describe the gendered experiences of two 23-year old Filipinas born and raised in Hong Kong through what Claudia Mitchell has described as girl method – research with girls for girls and about girls’ concerns – in our case producing visual depictions of girlhood in cellphilms and collaborative writing. We (...)
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  14.  2
    “I Cannot Hide My Anger to Spare You Guilt”: On BLMTO and Canadian Mainstream Media’s Response.Valentina Capurri - 2021 - Studies in Social Justice 15 (1):129-144.
    In this paper, I examine Canadian mainstream media’s response to Black Lives Matter Toronto, focusing in particular on two events that occurred in the city in the Summer of 2016 and Winter of 2017. By relying on Critical Race Theory, I argue that a White-dominated press has been unwilling to engage with the message presented by Black activists under the excuse that the tone of the message is overly harsh and threatening to White audiences. After analysing the historical roots of (...)
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  15.  3
    Things That Make White People Uncomfortable.Mark Currie - 2021 - Studies in Social Justice 15 (1):162-165.
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  16.  2
    More Powerful Together: Conversations with Climate Activists and Indigenous Land Defenders.Emily Eaton - 2021 - Studies in Social Justice 15 (1):155-157.
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  17.  1
    Poverty as Ideology: Rescuing Social Justice From Global Development Agendas.Sean Field - 2021 - Studies in Social Justice 15 (1):166-170.
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  18. Use of Arts-Based Research to Uncover Racism.Trehani M. Fonseka, Akin Taiwo & Bharati Sethi - 2021 - Studies in Social Justice 15 (1):43-58.
    The article provides an overview of arts-based research within social work and general healthcare practice in Canada, and how it can be used to uncover racism within vulnerable populations, particularly youth, women, immigrants and refugees, the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and intersex community, and Indigenous peoples. This is a general review of the literature. A literature search was conducted using the University of Western Ontario’s Summons database, with coverage from January 2000 to February 2019. Data exploring participant experiences, personal (...)
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  19.  1
    Mobilities, Mobility Justice and Social Justice.Christina Gabriel - 2021 - Studies in Social Justice 15 (1):158-161.
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  20.  1
    “Giving Voice” in Research: Critical Community Reflections.Chelsea Jones, Bonnie Cummings-Vickaryous & Katherine Taylor - 2021 - Studies in Social Justice 15 (1):145-154.
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  21.  3
    Historic and Contemporary Environmental Justice Issues Among Native Americans in the Gulf Coast Region of the United States.Jessica L. Liddell, Catherine E. McKinley & Jennifer M. Lilly - 2021 - Studies in Social Justice 15 (1):1-24.
    Settler-colonialism is founded in environmental racism, and environmental justice is foundational to all forms of decolonialization. Native American groups located in the Gulf Coast Region of the United States are particularly vulnerable to environmental justice issues such as climate change and oil spills due to their geographic location and reliance on the coastal region for economic and social resources. This study used the framework of historical oppression, resilience, and transcendence to explore the historic and contemporary forms of environmental injustice experienced (...)
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  22.  2
    Facilitators and Inhibitors of Mental Discrimination in the Workplace: A Traditional Review.Damian Mellifont - 2021 - Studies in Social Justice 15 (1):59-80.
    Discrimination can closely follow disclosure of neurodivergence in the workplace. This traditional review of the literature therefore aims to critically explore factors that facilitate and inhibit mental discrimination in workplace environments, and produce an evidence-based, anti-discrimination guide supporting neurodivergent employees. Applying content analysis to 64 scholarly articles retrieved from Scopus, ProQuest Central and PsycINFO databases, this traditional review offers three main messages which should be of value to HR policymakers and practitioners. First, the spirit of diversity and inclusion needs to (...)
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  23.  3
    Social (In)Justice and Rental Housing Discrimination in Urban Canada: The Case of Ethno-Racial Minorities in the Herongate Community in Ottawa.Joseph Mensah & Daniel Tucker-Simmons - 2021 - Studies in Social Justice 15 (1):81-101.
    In 2015, the predominantly visible minority immigrant community of Herongate, in Ottawa, Ontario, was slated for redevelopment by its landlord, Timbercreek Asset Management. This redevelopment involved mass eviction of the incumbent tenants, demolition of the existing affordable housing and its replacement with luxury rentals, which, by all indications, are beyond the financial reach of the former Herongage tenants. This paper seeks to problematize large-scale residential real estate redevelopment in Canada and examine its impact, using the Herongate situation as a case (...)
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  24.  3
    Constructing Another World: Solidarity and the Right to Water.Caitlin Schroering - 2021 - Studies in Social Justice 15 (1):102-128.
    Globally, one in eight people lacks access to potable water; more people die from unsafe drinking water than from all forms of violence, including war. A substantial body of research documents that the privatization of water – led by global financial institutions working in collusion with governments and corporations – does not lead to more people gaining access to safe water. In fact, the opposite is true: privatization leads to both higher cost and lower quality water. For the past century, (...)
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  25.  3
    Re-Placing “Place” in Internationalised Higher Education: Reflections From Aotearoa New Zealand.Vivienne Anderson & Zoë Bristowe - 2021 - Studies in Social Justice 14 (2):410-428.
    Aotearoa New Zealand is a small, island nation located on the rim of Oceania. Since colonisation by British settlers in the mid-1800s, the internationalisation of higher education in Aotearoa New Zealand has reflected shifting notions of nationhood – from an extension of Great Britain, to a bicultural nation, to a player in the global knowledge economy. Since the late 1980s, internationalisation policy has reflected the primacy of market concerns; the internationalisation of HE has been imagined primarily as a means to (...)
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  26.  3
    Decolonizing Refugee Studies, Standing Up for Indigenous Justice: Challenges and Possibilities of a Politics of Place.Sedef Arat-Koc - 2021 - Studies in Social Justice 14 (2):371-390.
    This paper interrogates the challenges and potentials for solidarity between refugees and Indigenous peoples by bringing decolonial, anti-colonial and anti-imperialist critiques in different parts of the world, including in white settler colonies and in the Third World, into conversation with each other and with Refugee Studies. The first section of the paper offers two analytical steps towards decolonizing mainstream Refugee Studies. The first step involves identifying, analyzing and problematizing what we may call “an elephant in the room,” a parallax gap (...)
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  27.  1
    Reflections on Teaching Critical Migration Law in a Settler-Colonial Context.Amar Bhatia - 2021 - Studies in Social Justice 14 (2):505-514.
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  28.  3
    Empire’s Tracks: Indigenous Nations, Chinese Workers, and the Transcontinental Railroad.Asmita Bhutani - 2021 - Studies in Social Justice 14 (2):528-531.
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  29.  3
    Enacting a Latinx Decolonial Politic of Belonging: Latinx Community Workers’ Experiences Negotiating Identity and Citizenship in Toronto, Canada.Madelaine Cahuas & Alexandra Arraiz Matute - 2021 - Studies in Social Justice 14 (2):268-286.
    This paper explores how women and non-binary Latinx Community Workers in Toronto, Canada, negotiate their identities, citizenship practices and politics in relation to settler colonialism and decolonization. We demonstrate how LCWs enact a Latinx decolonial politic of belonging, an alternative way of practicing citizenship that strives to simultaneously challenge both Canadian and Latin American settler colonialism. This can be seen when LCWs refuse to be recognized on white settler terms as “proud Canadians,” and create community-based learning initiatives that incite conversations (...)
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  30.  2
    On Migration and Indigenous Sovereignty in a Chronically Mobile World.Soma Chatterjee & Tania Das Gupta - 2021 - Studies in Social Justice 14 (2):246-267.
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  31.  2
    “Theorizing Our Place”: Indigenous Women’s Scholarship From 1985-2020 and the Emerging Dialogue with Anti-Racist Feminisms. [REVIEW]Elaine Coburn - 2021 - Studies in Social Justice 14 (2):429-453.
    In this article, I review contemporary Indigenous women’s scholarship, describing transformations from 1985 to the present, first to characterize this scholarship on its own terms and second to situate this literature with respect to recent, nascent dialogues with anti-racist feminisms. What is the focus and range of Indigenous women’s scholarship, from 1985 until today? What does this work seek to do, that is, what are the intertwined political and scholarly aims of this scholarship? I suggest that Indigenous women’s scholarly writing (...)
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  32.  2
    Reflections on Conversations and Dialogues with Recent Settlers.Adrian Downey - 2021 - Studies in Social Justice 14 (2):486-495.
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  33.  3
    Narrating Colonial Silences: Racialized Social Work Educators Unsettling Our Settlerhood.Abdelfettah Elkchirid, Anh Phung Ngo & Martha Kuwee Kumsa - 2021 - Studies in Social Justice 14 (2):287-305.
    In this paper, three racialized social work educators unsettle our settled colonial silences as acts of self-decolonization and as a way of responding to the call to action by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada. Hailing from the uneven manifestations of global capitalism and coloniality in Morocco, Vietnam, and Ethiopia, we draw on various critical theories to interrogate our unique entanglements with the imperial project of entwined settler colonialism and white supremacy. We narrate our embodied coloniality and how the (...)
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  34.  1
    Toward an Understanding of International Students Within Canadian Settler-Colonial Capitalism.Bianca Gomez - 2021 - Studies in Social Justice 14 (2):515-525.
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  35.  1
    Untitled (2019).Andil Gosine - 2021 - Studies in Social Justice 14 (2):526-527.
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  36.  1
    Transnational Modernity/Coloniality: Linking Punjab’s Canal Colonies, Migration, and Settler Colonialism for Critical Solidarities in Canada.Jaspreet Ranauta - 2021 - Studies in Social Justice 14 (2):352-370.
    This paper offers a transnational analytical framework to inform contemporary anti-racist solidarity building in what is now called Canada by engaging with migration, colonialism, and indigeneity. In particular, I trace the historical entanglements of modernity/coloniality from the British Empire’s Canal Colonies project in Punjab to colonial policies in what is now called British Columbia while centring land and Indigenous sovereignty.
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  37.  1
    Pacific Academic Migrants: Re-Shaping Spaces in Dynamic Times.Kabini Sanga & Martyn Reynolds - 2021 - Studies in Social Justice 14 (2):496-504.
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  38.  1
    Against National Sovereignty: The Postcolonial New World Order and the Containment of Decolonization.Nandita Sharma - 2021 - Studies in Social Justice 14 (2):391-409.
    In this paper, I examine the growing reliance on discourses of autochthony in nationalisms throughout the world. Native-ness is increasingly being made a key criterion for claiming national sovereignty over territory, as well as the more amorphous – but no less consequential – claim to national membership. By examining the crucial colonial genealogy of autochthonous discursive practices, I argue that claims to autochthony are metaphysical and, as such, deeply depoliticizing of the exclusions they produce. Drawing upon historical studies showing how (...)
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  39.  3
    Disability’s Circularity: Presence, Absence and Erasure in Australian Settler Colonial Biopolitical Population Regimes.Karen Soldatic - 2021 - Studies in Social Justice 14 (2):306-320.
    In this paper, I explore the ways in which settler-colonial states utilize the category of disability in immigration and Indigenous population regimes to redress settler-colonial anxieties of white fragility. As well documented within the literature, settler-colonial governance operates a particular logic of population management that aims to replace longstanding Indigenous peoples with settler populations of a particular kind. Focusing on the case of Australia and drawing on a range of historical and current empirical sources, the paper examines the central importance (...)
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  40.  3
    Contesting Settler Colonial Accounts: Temporality, Migration and Place-Making in Scarborough, Ontario.Paloma E. Villegas, Patricia Landolt, Victoria Freeman, Joe Hermer, Ranu Basu & Bojana Videkanic - 2021 - Studies in Social Justice 14 (2):321-351.
    The paper considers how the logic of settler colonialism, the active and ongoing dispossession of Indigenous peoples, shapes scholarship on migration, race and citizenship in Canada. It draws on the insights of settler colonial theory and critiques of methodological nationalism to do so. The concept of differential inclusion and assemblages methodology are proposed as a way to understand the relationship between Indigeneity and migration in a settler colonial context. The paper develops this conceptual proposal through an analysis of a single (...)
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  41.  1
    Lessons From "No Ban on Stolen Land".Harshita Yalamarty - 2021 - Studies in Social Justice 14 (2):474-485.
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  42.  1
    Dreams of a Black Commons on Turtle Island.Rachel Zellars - 2021 - Studies in Social Justice 14 (2):454-473.
    This essay opens with a discussion of the Black commons and the possibility it offers for visioning coherence between Black land relationality and Indigenous sovereignty. Two sites of history – Black slavery and Black migration prior to the twentieth century – present illuminations and challenges to Black and Indigenous relations on Turtle Island, as they expose the “antagonisms history has left us”, and the ways antiblackness is produced as a return to what is deemed impossible, unimaginable, or unforgivable about Black (...)
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