Year:

  1.  6
    The ‘Do It Yourself’ Paradigm: An Inquiry Into the Historical Roots of the Neglect of Testimony.Emmanuel Alloa - 2017 - Early Science and Medicine 22 (4):333-360.
    In contemporary social epistemology, the claim has been made that there is a traditional “neglect of testimonial knowledge,” and that in the history of epistemology, first-hand self-knowledge was invariably prioritised over secondary knowledge. While this paper acknowledges some truth in these statements, it challenges the given explanations: the mentioned neglect of testimonial knowledge is based not so much on a primacy of self-knowledge, but that of self-agency. This article retraces some crucial chapters of this ‘do-it-yourself’ paradigm: it considers the imperative (...)
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  2. La Raison des Corps : Mécanisme Et Science Médicale, Written by Raphaële Andrault, 2016.Fabrizio Baldassarri - 2017 - Early Science and Medicine 22 (4):381-383.
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  3. Menstruation and Procreation in Early Modern France, Written by Cathy McClive, 2015.Susan Broomhall - 2017 - Early Science and Medicine 22 (4):384-386.
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  4. The Courtiers’ Anatomists: Animals and Humans in Louis XIV’s Paris, Written by Anita Guerrini, 2015.Margaret Carlyle - 2017 - Early Science and Medicine 22 (4):393-395.
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  5.  2
    The Oxford Handbook of Generality in Mathematics and the Sciences, Edited by Karine Chemla, Renaud Chorlay and David Rabouin, 2016.Vincenzo De Risi - 2017 - Early Science and Medicine 22 (4):399-403.
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  6. The Experimental Caribbean: Creating Knowledge and Healing in the Early Modern Atlantic, Written by Pablo Gómez, 2017.Matthew Mulcahy - 2017 - Early Science and Medicine 22 (4):390-392.
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  7. Lodewijk de Bils’ and Tobias Andreae’s Cartesian Bodies: Embalmment Experiments, Medical Controversies and Mechanical Philosophy.Pietro Daniel Omodeo - 2017 - Early Science and Medicine 22 (4):301-332.
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  8. Measuring Shadows: Kepler’s Optics of Invisibility, Written by Raz Chen-Morris, 2016.Purkaple Brent - 2017 - Early Science and Medicine 22 (4):387-389.
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  9. Ärztliches Leben und Denken im arabischen Mittelalter, written by Johann Christoph Bürgel and Fabian Käs, 2016.Julia Roever - 2017 - Early Science and Medicine 22 (4):378-380.
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  10. Nature Speaks: Medieval Literature and Aristotelian Philosophy, Written by Kellie Robertson, 2017.E. R. Truitt - 2017 - Early Science and Medicine 22 (4):375-403.
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  11. Review Essay: Beyond Eurocentric Histories of Plague.Nükhet Varlık - 2017 - Early Science and Medicine 22 (4):361-373.
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  12. The Nature of Blood: Debating Haematology and Blood Chemistry in the Eighteenth-Century Dutch Republic.Ruben E. Verwaal - 2017 - Early Science and Medicine 22 (4):271-300.
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  13. Science Among the Ottomans: The Cultural Creation and Exchange of Knowledge, Written by Miri Shefer-Mossensohn, 2015.Duygu Yıldırım - 2017 - Early Science and Medicine 22 (4):396-398.
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  14.  1
    Documenting Medications: Patients’ Demand, Physicians’ Virtuosity, and Genre-Mixing of Prescription-Cases in Seventeenth-Century China.He Bian - 2017 - Early Science and Medicine 22 (1):103-123.
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  15. The Sublunary Phaenomena as a Subject of Medieval Academic Discussion: Meteorology and the Prague University Disputationes de Quolibet.Barbora Kocánová - 2017 - Early Science and Medicine 22 (1):72-102.
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  16.  4
    From Animal Bodies To Human Souls: Aristotelian Animals in Della Porta’s Physiognomics.Cecilia Muratori - 2017 - Early Science and Medicine 22 (1):1-23.
    This article analyses the role that animals play in Della Porta’s method of physiognomics. It claims that Della Porta created his own, original, method by appropriating, and yet selectively adapting Aristotelian and pseudo-Aristotelian sources. This has not been adequately reconstructed before in previous studies on Della Porta. I trace, in two steps, the conceptual trajectory of Della Porta’s physiognomics, from human psychology to animal psychology, and ultimately from psychology to ethics. In the first step, I show how Della Porta substantially (...)
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  17. A Reluctant Innovator: Graeco-Arabic Astronomy in the Computus of Magister Cunestabulus.C. Philipp E. Nothaft - 2017 - Early Science and Medicine 22 (1):24-54.
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  18. Projectile Motion in a Vacuum According to Francesc Marbres, Francis of Marchia, Gerald Odonis, and Nicholas Bonet.Chris Schabel - 2017 - Early Science and Medicine 22 (1):55-71.
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  19. Custom and Habit in Physiology and the Science of Human Nature in the British Enlightenment.John Wright - 2017 - Early Science and Medicine 22:183-207.
    In this paper I show how what came to be known as “the double law of habit,” first formulated by Joseph Butler in a discussion of moral psychology in 1736, was taken up and developed by medical physiologists William Porterfield, Robert Whytt, and William Cullen as they disputed fundamental questions regarding the influence of the mind on the body, the possibility of unconscious mental processes, and the nature and extent of voluntary action. The paper shows, on a particular topic, the (...)
     
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