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  1.  16
    Baseless Knowledge.Guido Melchior - 2017 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 17 (50):211-231.
    It is a commonly held view in contemporary epistemology that for having knowledge it is necessary to have an appropriately based belief, although numerous different views exist about when a belief’s base is appropriate. Broadly speaking, they all share the view that one can only have knowledge if the belief’s base is in some sense truth-related or tracking the truth. Baseless knowledge can then be defi ned as knowledge where the belief is acquired and sustained in a way that does (...)
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  2. Let’s Not Worry About the Reclamation Worry.Cepollaro Bianca - 2017 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 17 (2):181-193.
    In this paper, I discuss the Reclamation Worry, raised by Anderson and Lepore 2013 and addressed by Ritchie concerning the appropriation of slurs. I argue that Ritchie’s way to solve the RW is not adequate and I show why such an apparent worry is not actually problematic and should not lead us to postulate a rich complex semantics for reclaimed slurs. To this end, after illustrating the phenomenon of appropriation of slurs, I introduce the Reclamation Worry. In section 3, I (...)
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  3. On the Moral Irrelevance of a Global Basic Structure.Dumitru Adelin Costin - 2017 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 17 (2):233-264.
    Many important criticisms to the possibility of global justice are advanced following one or another operationalization of the Rawlsian concept of a basic structure. The purpose of this paper is twofold: i) to show that the existence of a global basic structure is irrelevant from the standpoint of justice; ii) to set the stage for a cosmopolitan theory of global justice that employs satisficing sufficientarianism as a distributive principle. One of the main contentions is that the institutional-interactional cut in the (...)
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  4. Understanding “I”: Thought and Language. [REVIEW]David Grčki - 2017 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 17 (2):265-271.
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  5. Loaded Words and Expressive Words.Jeshion Robin - 2017 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 17 (2):111-130.
    In this paper, I assess the relative merits of two semantic frameworks for slurring terms. Each aims to distinguish slurs from their neutral counterparts via their semantics. On one, recently developed by Kent Bach, that which differentiates the slurring term from its neutral counterpart is encoded as a ‘loaded’ descriptive content. Whereas the neutral counterpart ‘NC’ references a group, the slur has as its content “NC, and therefore contemptible”. On the other, a version of hybrid expressivism, the semantically encoded aspect (...)
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  6. Introduction.Jutronić Dunja & Miščević Nenad - 2017 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 17 (2):107-110.
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  7. The Myth of Embodied Metaphor.Kompa Nikola - 2017 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 17 (2):195-210.
    According to a traditionally infl uential idea metaphors have mostly ornamental value. Current research, on the other hand, stresses the cognitive purposes metaphors serve. According to the Conceptual Theory of Metaphor, e.g., expressions are commonly used metaphorically in order to conceptualize abstract and mental phenomena. More specifically, proponents of CTM claim that abstract terms are understood by means of metaphors and that metaphor comprehension, in turn, is embodied. In this paper, I will argue that CTM fails on both counts.
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  8. Precis of the Theoretical Part of A Word Which Bears a Sword.Nenad Miščević - 2017 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 17 (2):131-143.
    Pejoratives are negative terms for alleged social kinds: ethnic, gender, racial, and other. They manage to refer the way kind-terms do, relatively independently of false elements contained in their senses. This proposal, presented in the book, is called the Negative Hybrid Social Kind Term theory, or NHSKT theory, for short. The theory treats the content of pejoratives as unitary, in analogy with unitary thick concepts: both neutral-cum-negative properties ascribed and negative prescriptions voiced are part of the semantics preferably with some (...)
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  9. Knowledge Through Imagination. [REVIEW]Nenad Miščević - 2017 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 17 (2):285-289.
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  10. Pejoratives and Testimonial Injustice.Perhat Julija - 2017 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 17 (2):145-154.
    Testimonial injustice is a hot topic in social epistemology. My own work is concerned with pejoratives, so in this paper I wish to connect them with such injustice. So, my present topic is testimonial injustice perpetrated by the serious use of pejoratives, in particular, gender pejoratives. It combines two strands: on the one hand, the work on testimonial injustice; and here I shall rely on Miranda Fricker’s work, and on the other hand, my own central area of interest, pejoratives.
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  11. Social Identity, Indexicality, and the Appropriation of Slurs.Katherine Ritchie - 2017 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 17 (2):155-180.
    Slurs are expressions that can be used to demean and dehumanize targets based on their membership in racial, ethnic, religious, gender, or sexual orientation groups. Almost all treatments of slurs posit that they have derogatory content of some sort. Such views—which I call content-based—must explain why in cases of appropriation slurs fail to express their standard derogatory contents. A popular strategy is to take appropriated slurs to be ambiguous; they have both a derogatory content and a positive appropriated content. However, (...)
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  12. The Original Position. [REVIEW]Žunić Dorijan - 2017 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 17 (2):272-285.
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  13.  1
    Are We Causally Redundant?Benovsky Jiri - 2017 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 17 (1):1-8.
    Some friends of eliminativism about ordinary material objects such as tables or statues think that we need to make exceptions. In this article, I am interested in Trenton Merricks’ claim that we need to make an exception for us, conscious beings, and that we are something over and above simples arranged in suitable ways, unlike tables or statues. I resist this need for making an exception, using the resources of four-dimensionalism.
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  14.  15
    Self-Deception and Selectivity: Reply to Jurjako.Jose Luis Bermudez - 2017 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 17 (1):91-95.
    Marko Jurjako’s article “Self-deception and the selectivity problem” (Jurjako 2013) offers a very interesting discussion of intentionalist approaches to self-deception and in particular the selectivity objection to anti-intentionalism raised in Bermúdez 1997 and 2000. This note responds to Jurjako’s claim that intentionalist models of self-deception face their own version of the selectivity problem, offering an account of how intentions are formed that can explain the selectivity of self-deception, even in the “common or garden” cases that Jurjako emphasizes.
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  15. Bayesianism and the Idea of Scientific Rationality.Jeremiah Joven Joaquin - 2017 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 17 (1):33-43.
    Bayesianism has been dubbed as the most adequate and successful theory of scientific rationality. Its success mainly lies in its ability to combine two mutually exclusive elements involved in the process of theory-selection in science, viz.: the subjective and objective elements. My aim in this paper is to explain and evaluate Bayesianism’s account of scientific rationality by contrasting it with two other accounts.
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  16.  5
    The Grounding Problem for Panpsychism and the Identity Theory of Powers.Kadić Nino - 2017 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 17 (1):45-55.
    In this paper, I address the grounding problem for contemporary Russellian panpsychism, or the question of how consciousness as an intrinsic nature is connected to dispositions or powers of objects. I claim that Russellian panpsychists cannot offer an adequate solution to the grounding problem and that they should reject the claim that consciousness, as an intrinsic nature, grounds the powers of objects. Instead, I argue that they should favour the identity theory of powers, where categorical and dispositional properties are identified. (...)
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  17.  1
    Possible Uses of Tennant’s Methodology in Secondary Education.Kotnik Rudi - 2017 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 17 (1):97-106.
    The paper addresses the issue whether Tennant’s textbook Introducing Philosophy, a demanding textbook based on the methodology of Analytical philosophy, can be useful for high school teachers not trained in Analytical methodology. The pedagogical background is presented through a conceptual framework of problematization, conceptualisation and argumentation, and I follow Tennant’s methodology through these three principles. The issue which I discuss is how Tennant’s methodology can help teachers to foster the three analytical abilities in students. I will show how his presentation (...)
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  18. A Philosophical Critique of the Concept of Miracle as a “Supernatural Event”.Adam Świeżyński - 2017 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 17 (1):57-72.
    The notion of the supernaturality of an event may be understood in various ways. Most frequently ‘supernatural’ means ‘separated from nature’, i.e. different from nature. Thus, what is meant here is the difference in ontological character. The definitions of miracle, present in literature, emphasize the fact that we may talk about a miracle only when the phenomenon takes place beyond the natural order or stands in opposition to it. The description of a miracle as a ‘supernatural event’ contains in itself (...)
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  19. Maximization, Slotean Satisficing, and Theories of Sufficientarian Justice.Alexandru Volacu - 2017 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 17 (1):73-90.
    In this paper I seek to assess the responses provided by several theories of sufficientarian justice in cases where individuals hold different conceptions of rationality. Towards this purpose, I build two test cases and study the normative prescriptions which various sufficiency views offer in each of them. I maintain that resource sufficientarianism does not provide a normatively plausible response to the first case, since its distributive prescriptions would violate the principle of personal good and that subjective-threshold welfare sufficientarianism as well (...)
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  20.  6
    Imagination: A Sine Qua Non of Science.Michael T. Stuart - 2017 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy (49):9-32.
    What role does the imagination play in scientific progress? After examining several studies in cognitive science, I argue that one thing the imagination does is help to increase scientific understanding, which is itself indispensable for scientific progress. Then, I sketch a transcendental justification of the role of imagination in this process.
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