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  1.  10
    Grounded Cognition Entails Linguistic Relativity: A Neglected Implication of a Major Semantic Theory.David Kemmerer - 2023 - Topics in Cognitive Science 15 (4):615-647.
    According to the popular Grounded Cognition Model (GCM), the sensory and motor features of concepts, including word meanings, are stored directly within neural systems for perception and action. More precisely, the core claim is that these concrete conceptual features reuse some of the same modality-specific representations that serve to categorize experiences involving the relevant kinds of objects and events. Research in semantic typology, however, has shown that word meanings vary significantly across the roughly 6500 languages in the world. I argue (...)
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  2.  20
    Grounded Cognition Entails Linguistic Relativity: A Neglected Implication of a Major Semantic Theory.David Kemmerer - 2023 - Topics in Cognitive Science 15 (4):615-647.
    According to the popular Grounded Cognition Model (GCM), the sensory and motor features of concepts, including word meanings, are stored directly within neural systems for perception and action. More precisely, the core claim is that these concrete conceptual features reuse some of the same modality-specific representations that serve to categorize experiences involving the relevant kinds of objects and events. Research in semantic typology, however, has shown that word meanings vary significantly across the roughly 6500 languages in the world. I argue (...)
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  3.  11
    Grounded Cognition Entails Linguistic Relativity: A Neglected Implication of a Major Semantic Theory.David Kemmerer - 2023 - Topics in Cognitive Science 15 (4):615-647.
    According to the popular Grounded Cognition Model (GCM), the sensory and motor features of concepts, including word meanings, are stored directly within neural systems for perception and action. More precisely, the core claim is that these concrete conceptual features reuse some of the same modality-specific representations that serve to categorize experiences involving the relevant kinds of objects and events. Research in semantic typology, however, has shown that word meanings vary significantly across the roughly 6500 languages in the world. I argue (...)
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  4.  9
    Introduction to topiCS Volume 15, Issue 3.Andrea Bender - 2023 - Topics in Cognitive Science 15 (3):332-333.
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  5.  19
    Thinking Like an Earthling: Children's Reasoning About Individual and Collective Action Related to Environmental Sustainability.Tina A. Grotzer & S. Lynneth Solis - 2023 - Topics in Cognitive Science 15 (3):433-451.
    Learning to accept and understand our identity as inhabitants of planet Earth is an essential aspect of living sustainably in a global community with others. What is involved in learning, that despite what divides us, we are first and foremost Earthlings and that the well-being of our planetary home is in our collective hands? What are the cognitive features of concepts that are inherent to thinking like an Earthling? This article considers themes that arise from research that inform what is (...)
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  6.  9
    Conceptualizing Human–Nature Relationships: Implications of Human Exceptionalist Thinking for Sustainability and Conservation.Joan J. H. Kim, Nicole Betz, Brian Helmuth & John D. Coley - 2023 - Topics in Cognitive Science 15 (3):357-387.
    The ways in which people conceptualize the human–nature relationship have significant implications for proenvironmental values and attitudes, sustainable behavior, and environmental policy measures. Human exceptionalism (HE) is one such conceptual framework, involving the belief that humans and human societies exist independently of the ecosystems in which they are embedded, promoting a sharp ontological boundary between humans and the rest of the natural world. In this paper, we introduce HE in more depth, exploring the impact of HE on perceptions of the (...)
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  7.  7
    Sensory Ecology, Bioeconomy, and the Age of COVID: A Parallax View of Indigenous and Scientific Knowledge.Glenn H. Shepard & Lewis Daly - 2023 - Topics in Cognitive Science 15 (3):584-607.
    Drawing on original ethnobotanical and anthropological research among Indigenous peoples across the Amazon, we examine synergies and dissonances between Indigenous and Western scientific knowledge about the environment, resource use, and sustainability. By focusing on the sensory dimension of Indigenous engagements with the environment—an approach we have described as “sensory ecology” and explored through the method of “phytoethnography”—we promote a symmetrical dialogue between Indigenous and scientific understandings around such phenomena as animal–plant mutualisms, phytochemical toxicity, sustainable forest management in “multinatural” landscapes, and (...)
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  8.  17
    Habituation Reflects Optimal Exploration Over Noisy Perceptual Samples.Anjie Cao, Gal Raz, Rebecca Saxe & Michael C. Frank - 2023 - Topics in Cognitive Science 15 (2):290-302.
    This paper presents the Rational Action, Noisy Choice for Habituation (RANCH) model. The model was evaluated with adult looking time collected from a paradigm analogous to the infant habituation paradigm. And the model captured key patterns of looking time documented in developmental research: habituation and dishabituation.
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  9.  9
    A Neural Dynamic Model Perceptually Grounds Nested Noun Phrases.Daniel Sabinasz & Gregor Schöner - 2023 - Topics in Cognitive Science 15 (2):274-289.
    We present a neural dynamic model that perceptually grounds nested noun phrases, that is, noun phrases that contain further (possibly also nested) noun phrases as parts. The model receives input from the visual array and a representation of a noun phrase from language processing. It organizes a search for the denoted object in the visual scene. The model is a neural dynamic architecture of interacting neural populations which has clear interfaces with perceptual processes. It solves a set of theoretical challenges, (...)
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  10.  8
    A Neural Dynamic Model Perceptually Grounds Nested Noun Phrases.Daniel Sabinasz & Gregor Schöner - 2023 - Topics in Cognitive Science 15 (2):274-289.
    We present a neural dynamic model that perceptually grounds nested noun phrases, that is, noun phrases that contain further (possibly also nested) noun phrases as parts. The model receives input from the visual array and a representation of a noun phrase from language processing. It organizes a search for the denoted object in the visual scene. The model is a neural dynamic architecture of interacting neural populations which has clear interfaces with perceptual processes. It solves a set of theoretical challenges, (...)
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  11.  10
    Introduction to topiCS Volume 15, Issue 1.Andrea Bender - 2023 - Topics in Cognitive Science 15 (1):4-5.
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  12.  20
    Measuring Spatial Perspective Taking: Analysis of Four Measures Using Item Response Theory.Maria Brucato, Andrea Frick, Stefan Pichelmann, Alina Nazareth & Nora S. Newcombe - 2023 - Topics in Cognitive Science 15 (1):46-74.
    Research on spatial thinking requires reliable and valid measures of individual differences in various component skills. Spatial perspective taking (PT)—the ability to represent viewpoints different from one's own—is one kind of spatial skill that is especially relevant to navigation. This study had two goals. First, the psychometric properties of four PT tests were examined: Four Mountains Task (FMT), Spatial Orientation Task (SOT), Perspective-Taking Task for Adults (PTT-A), and Photographic Perspective-Taking Task (PPTT). Using item response theory (IRT), item difficulty, discriminability, and (...)
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  13.  18
    Measuring Spatial Perspective Taking: Analysis of Four Measures Using Item Response Theory.Maria Brucato, Andrea Frick, Stefan Pichelmann, Alina Nazareth & Nora S. Newcombe - 2023 - Topics in Cognitive Science 15 (1):46-74.
    Research on spatial thinking requires reliable and valid measures of individual differences in various component skills. Spatial perspective taking (PT)—the ability to represent viewpoints different from one's own—is one kind of spatial skill that is especially relevant to navigation. This study had two goals. First, the psychometric properties of four PT tests were examined: Four Mountains Task (FMT), Spatial Orientation Task (SOT), Perspective-Taking Task for Adults (PTT-A), and Photographic Perspective-Taking Task (PPTT). Using item response theory (IRT), item difficulty, discriminability, and (...)
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  14.  20
    Navigational Experience and the Preservation of Spatial Abilities into Old Age Among a Tropical Forager‐Farmer Population.Helen E. Davis, Michael Gurven & Elizabeth Cashdan - 2023 - Topics in Cognitive Science 15 (1):187-212.
    Navigational performance responds to navigational challenges, and both decline with age in Western populations as older people become less mobile. But mobility does not decline everywhere; Tsimané forager-farmers in Bolivia remain highly mobile throughout adulthood, traveling frequently by foot and dugout canoe for subsistence and social visitation. We, therefore, measured both natural mobility and navigational performance in 305 Tsimané adults, to assess differences with age and to test whether greater mobility was related to better navigational performance across the lifespan. Daily (...)
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  15.  15
    Navigational Experience and the Preservation of Spatial Abilities into Old Age Among a Tropical Forager‐Farmer Population.Helen E. Davis, Michael Gurven & Elizabeth Cashdan - 2023 - Topics in Cognitive Science 15 (1):187-212.
    Navigational performance responds to navigational challenges, and both decline with age in Western populations as older people become less mobile. But mobility does not decline everywhere; Tsimané forager-farmers in Bolivia remain highly mobile throughout adulthood, traveling frequently by foot and dugout canoe for subsistence and social visitation. We, therefore, measured both natural mobility and navigational performance in 305 Tsimané adults, to assess differences with age and to test whether greater mobility was related to better navigational performance across the lifespan. Daily (...)
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  16.  17
    Understanding Differences in Wayfinding Strategies.Mary Hegarty, Chuanxiuyue He, Alexander P. Boone, Shuying Yu, Emily G. Jacobs & Elizabeth R. Chrastil - 2023 - Topics in Cognitive Science 15 (1):102-119.
    Navigating to goal locations in a known environment (wayfinding) can be accomplished by different strategies, notably by taking habitual, well-learned routes (response strategy) or by inferring novel paths, such as shortcuts, from spatial knowledge of the environment's layout (place strategy). Human and animal neuroscience studies reveal that these strategies reflect different brain systems, with response strategies relying more on activation of the striatum and place strategies associated with activation of the hippocampus. In addition to individual differences in strategy, recent behavioral (...)
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  17.  21
    Understanding Differences in Wayfinding Strategies.Mary Hegarty, Chuanxiuyue He, Alexander P. Boone, Shuying Yu, Emily G. Jacobs & Elizabeth R. Chrastil - 2023 - Topics in Cognitive Science 15 (1):102-119.
    Navigating to goal locations in a known environment (wayfinding) can be accomplished by different strategies, notably by taking habitual, well-learned routes (response strategy) or by inferring novel paths, such as shortcuts, from spatial knowledge of the environment's layout (place strategy). Human and animal neuroscience studies reveal that these strategies reflect different brain systems, with response strategies relying more on activation of the striatum and place strategies associated with activation of the hippocampus. In addition to individual differences in strategy, recent behavioral (...)
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  18.  38
    Individual Differences and Skill Training in Cognitive Mapping: How and Why People Differ.Toru Ishikawa - 2023 - Topics in Cognitive Science 15 (1):163-186.
    Spatial ability plays important roles in academic learning and everyday activities. A type of spatial thinking that is of particular significance to people's daily lives is cognitive mapping, that is, the process of acquiring, representing, and using knowledge about spatial environments. However, the skill of cognitive mapping shows large individual differences, and the task of spatial orientation and navigation poses great difficulty for some people. In this article, I look at the motivation and findings in the research into spatial knowledge (...)
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  19.  20
    Importance of Path Planning Variability: A Simulation Study.Jeffrey L. Krichmar & Chuanxiuyue He - 2023 - Topics in Cognitive Science 15 (1):139-162.
    Individuals vary in the way they navigate through space. Some take novel shortcuts, while others rely on known routes to find their way around. We wondered how and why there is so much variation in the population. To address this, we first compared the trajectories of 368 human subjects navigating a virtual maze with simulated trajectories. The simulated trajectories were generated by strategy-based path planning algorithms from robotics. Based on the similarities between human trajectories and different strategy-based simulated trajectories, we (...)
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  20.  10
    Importance of Path Planning Variability: A Simulation Study.Jeffrey L. Krichmar & Chuanxiuyue He - 2023 - Topics in Cognitive Science 15 (1):139-162.
    Individuals vary in the way they navigate through space. Some take novel shortcuts, while others rely on known routes to find their way around. We wondered how and why there is so much variation in the population. To address this, we first compared the trajectories of 368 human subjects navigating a virtual maze with simulated trajectories. The simulated trajectories were generated by strategy-based path planning algorithms from robotics. Based on the similarities between human trajectories and different strategy-based simulated trajectories, we (...)
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  21.  14
    Toward an Understanding of Cognitive Mapping Ability Through Manipulations and Measurement of Schemas and Stress.Paulina Maxim & Thackery I. Brown - 2023 - Topics in Cognitive Science 15 (1):75-101.
    Daily function depends on an ability to mentally map our environment. Environmental factors such as visibility and layout, and internal factors such as psychological stress, can challenge spatial memory and efficient navigation. Importantly, people vary dramatically in their ability to navigate flexibly and overcome such challenges. In this paper, we present an overview of “schema theory” and our view of its relevance to navigational memory research. We review several studies from our group and others, that integrate manipulations of environmental complexity (...)
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  22.  12
    Toward an Understanding of Cognitive Mapping Ability Through Manipulations and Measurement of Schemas and Stress.Paulina Maxim & Thackery I. Brown - 2023 - Topics in Cognitive Science 15 (1):75-101.
    Daily function depends on an ability to mentally map our environment. Environmental factors such as visibility and layout, and internal factors such as psychological stress, can challenge spatial memory and efficient navigation. Importantly, people vary dramatically in their ability to navigate flexibly and overcome such challenges. In this paper, we present an overview of “schema theory” and our view of its relevance to navigational memory research. We review several studies from our group and others, that integrate manipulations of environmental complexity (...)
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  23.  9
    Toward an Understanding of Cognitive Mapping Ability Through Manipulations and Measurement of Schemas and Stress.Paulina Maxim & Thackery I. Brown - 2023 - Topics in Cognitive Science 15 (1):75-101.
    Daily function depends on an ability to mentally map our environment. Environmental factors such as visibility and layout, and internal factors such as psychological stress, can challenge spatial memory and efficient navigation. Importantly, people vary dramatically in their ability to navigate flexibly and overcome such challenges. In this paper, we present an overview of “schema theory” and our view of its relevance to navigational memory research. We review several studies from our group and others, that integrate manipulations of environmental complexity (...)
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  24.  16
    Building a Cognitive Science of Human Variation: Individual Differences in Spatial Navigation.Nora S. Newcombe, Mary Hegarty & David Uttal - 2023 - Topics in Cognitive Science 15 (1):6-14.
    This issue assesses how human spatial navigation differs: within individuals across short‐term variations in mood or stress, and between individuals across variations in age, gender, education, culture, and physical environment.
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  25.  18
    Explaining World‐Wide Variation in Navigation Ability from Millions of People: Citizen Science Project Sea Hero Quest.Hugo J. Spiers, Antoine Coutrot & Michael Hornberger - 2023 - Topics in Cognitive Science 15 (1):120-138.
    Navigation ability varies widely across humans. Prior studies have reported that being younger and a male has an advantage for navigation ability. However, these studies have generally involved small numbers of participants from a handful of western countries. Here, we review findings from our project Sea Hero Quest, which used a video game for mobile and tablet devices to test 3.9 million people on their navigation ability, sampling across every nation-state and from 18 to 99 years of age. Results revealed (...)
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  26.  9
    Explaining World‐Wide Variation in Navigation Ability from Millions of People: Citizen Science Project Sea Hero Quest.Hugo J. Spiers, Antoine Coutrot & Michael Hornberger - 2023 - Topics in Cognitive Science 15 (1):120-138.
    Navigation ability varies widely across humans. Prior studies have reported that being younger and a male has an advantage for navigation ability. However, these studies have generally involved small numbers of participants from a handful of western countries. Here, we review findings from our project Sea Hero Quest, which used a video game for mobile and tablet devices to test 3.9 million people on their navigation ability, sampling across every nation-state and from 18 to 99 years of age. Results revealed (...)
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  27.  13
    Reaching the Goal: Superior Navigators in Late Adulthood Provide a Novel Perspective into Successful Cognitive Aging.Ruojing Zhou, Tuğçe Belge & Thomas Wolbers - 2023 - Topics in Cognitive Science 15 (1):15-45.
    While old age is typically associated with a decline in spatial memory and navigational abilities,a subset of older adults demonstrates superior, sometimes even youth‐like performance. Here, we review cognitive and neural factors contributing to such superior spatial abilities, and we discuss potential links with preserved episodic memory in SuperAgers.
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  28.  92
    The Dynamicist Landscape.David L. Barack - 2023 - Topics in Cognitive Science.
    The dynamical hypothesis states that cognitive systems are dynamical systems. While dynamical systems play an important role in many cognitive phenomena, the dynamical hypothesis as stated applies to every system and so fails both to specify what makes cognitive systems distinct and to distinguish between proposals regarding the nature of cognitive systems. To avoid this problem, I distinguish several different types of dynamical systems, outlining four dimensions along which dynamical systems can vary: total-state versus partial-state, internal versus external, macroscopic versus (...)
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