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  1.  4
    Phenomenological Comparison: Pursuing Husserl’s “Time-Consciousness” in Poems by Wang Wei, Paul Celan and Santoka Taneda.Yi Chen & Boris Steipe - 2017 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 9 (3):241-259.
    ABSTRACT“Time-consciousness” constitutes the core of Edmund Husserl’s phenomenology. Extending from a project of reviving the comparative method, we develop Husserl’s phenomenological analysis of time as a method of literary comparison. Three views of time set the stage: the quatrain “Luán’s Fall” by the eighth-century Chinese poet Wang Wei, a stanza from the poem “Etched off‌” by Paul Celan, the quintessential post-war poet in German language, and the haiku “Walking, on and on” by the Japanese itinerant monk and free-verse haiku pioneer (...)
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  2.  4
    A Brief Defense of the Third Person Perspective in Moral Philosophy.Therese Scarpelli Cory - 2017 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 9 (3):279-283.
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  3.  6
    The Phenomenology of Spirit and the Daoist Sage.Paul J. D’Ambrosio - 2017 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 9 (3):202-217.
    In the Phenomenology of Spirit Hegel describes a mode of consciousness that is analogous to that of the sage in the Zhuangzi. He labels this “Evil Consciousness.” One of the more important phases of Spirit that leads up to this stage also resonates similarities, namely the “pure I” which Hegel modeled on Diderot’s Rameau’s Nephew. In what follows we will first look at the “pure I” before moving to the evil consciousness and making a comparison with the Daoist sage. By (...)
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  4.  2
    Smith’s Second-Personal First-Personal.Apple Igrek - 2017 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 9 (3):283-285.
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  5.  4
    In Irma's Eye of the Storm.David Jones - 2017 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 9 (3):199-199.
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  6.  7
    Is Guilt a Feeling? An Analysis of Guilt in Existential Philosophy.Kim Hye Young - 2017 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 9 (3):230-240.
    The concept of guilt in relation to conscience and anxiety is not referred to as a feeling or an emotion in existential philosophy. Rather, the phenomenon of guilt is analyzed through the structure of existence. In Being and Time, Heidegger interprets guilt in the context of Dasein’s understanding of its own Being. The nature of Dasein as a finite entity permeates the analysis of guilt, which is based on the analysis of negation and the time structure of Dasein. An existential (...)
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  7.  5
    Can Phenomenology Ground Moral Normativity?Matthew Rellihan - 2017 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 9 (3):285-290.
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  8.  1
    Falling Down a Waterfall an Examination of Crisis.Martin Schönfeld - 2017 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 9 (3):260-268.
    Falling down a waterfall is a boundary experience that epitomizes a crisis. This philosophical essay draws an analogy to the maladaptation civilization finds itself in. Falling down a waterfall is a singular event, but it has structure. There are stages that lead up to it, and if one survives the fall, there will be stages that follow it. I suggest that such a mishap is analogous to the ecological overshoot. What leads to the overshoot, and what is entailed by it, (...)
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  9.  2
    Phenomenology, Authenticity, and the Source of Morality: Replies to Cory, Igrek, and Rellihan.William H. Smith - 2017 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 9 (3):290-301.
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  10.  3
    The Phenomenology of Moral Normativity.William Hosmer Smith - 2017 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 9 (3):274-279.
    This symposium collects together five essays reflecting on The Phenomenology of Moral Normativity by William H. Smith. This work is an original monograph bridging the phenomenological tradition and contemporary moral theory in an attempt to articulate a phenomenological theory of moral normativity. The first piece in the symposium, by Smith, offers a précis of the book’s argumentative structure, including its central theses, methodological commitments, and pluralistic orientation. The next three pieces provide critical assessments of the book’s major narrative turns: Therese (...)
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  11.  2
    Reflection and Reflective Knowledge: A Review of Rudolf Makkreel’s Orientation and Judgment in Hermeneutics. [REVIEW]Cody Staton - 2017 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 9 (3):269-273.
    In this essay, I review Rudolf Makkreel’s, Orientation and Judgment in Hermeneutics, which, I claim, represents an original contribution to continental philosophy. I take up his consideration that hermeneutics should incorporate philosophical reflection that not only recognizes the significance of the historical contexts of interpretation, but also situates interpretation within the contexts of the twenty-first century. I regard Makkreel’s work to be primarily aimed at emphasizing the mutually inclusive roles of reflection and reflective judgment involved in interpretation.
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  12.  2
    National Unity and Potlatch: Genealogical Observations Pertaining to North America’s Accursed Share.Jason Kemp Winfree - 2017 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 9 (3):218-229.
    This paper offers a genealogy of national unity in the United States approached through practices of consumption and punishment. Drawing on the work of Foucault, Mauss, and Bataille, the analysis shows how these practices are mutually determining, how they demonstrate an economy of excess as opposed to one of utility or conservation, and how they depend on and reinforce specific patterns of discursive and emotional coding. The Thanksgiving holiday serves as a privileged site for locating the elements of an apparatus (...)
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  13. In This Issue.Jason M. Wirth & Michael Schwartz - 2017 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 9 (3):200-201.
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  14.  14
    Facing Up to the Eurocentrism and Racism of Academic Philosophy in the West: A Response to Davis, Direk, and Mills.Robert Bernasconi - 2017 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 9 (2):151-161.
    In this paper I address the questions posed to me by Bret Davis, Zeynep Direk, and Charles Mills, by focusing on, first, the eurocentrism of academic philosophy in the West and strategies to overcome it; secondly, the interface of critical philosophy of race and global politics, especially as the latter touches on Islamophobia; and, thirdly, the role of critical philosophy of race in challenging the complacency of philosophy departments in the face of the discipline’s long-standing complicity with racism.
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  15.  1
    Dislodging Eurocentrism and Racism From Philosophy.W. Davis Bret - 2017 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 9 (2):115-118.
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  16. Gadfly of Continental Philosophy: On Robert Bernasconi’s Critique of Philosophical Eurocentrism.Bret W. Davis - 2017 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 9 (2):119-129.
    This article examines the critique of philosophical Eurocentrism developed over the past two-and-a-half decades by Robert Bernasconi. The restriction of the moniker “philosophy” to the Western tradition, and the exclusion of non-Western traditions from the field, became the standard view only after the late eighteenth century. Bernasconi critically analyzes this restriction and exclusion and makes a compelling case for its philosophical illegitimacy. After showing how Bernasconi convincingly repudiates the identification of philosophy with Europe – asserted most explicitly by Continental philosophers (...)
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  17.  1
    An Englishman Abroad: Robert Bernasconi’s Work on Race.Charles W. Mills - 2017 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 9 (2):140-150.
    This article focuses on the contribution Robert Bernasconi has made to the critical philosophy of race. I look at some representative samples of his work under four categories: his racially informed critiques of canonical Western philosophical figures; his expositions/reconstructions/recuperations of racially informed theory from canonical Western philosophical figures; his reflections on race/whiteness/imperialism and their implications; and his views on race as it has shaped the historic and current realities of philosophy as a discipline.
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  18. Reading Alejandro Vallega Toward a Decolonial Aesthetics.Omar Rivera - 2017 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 9 (2):162-173.
    This article is an interpretation of Alejandro Vallega’s “decolonial aesthetics,” focusing on his book Latin American Philosophy: From Identity to Radical Exteriority. This interpretation situates decolonial aesthetics in relation to figures in the history of Latin American Philosophy, and the work of Aníbal Quijano, Enrique Dussel, Linda Martín Alcoff, and Gloria Anzaldúa. It also explores the determination of decolonial aesthetics as an aesthetics of liberation.
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  19.  1
    Thoughts on the Radical Exteriority of Identity.Marcia Sá Cavalcante Schuback - 2017 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 9 (2):174-183.
    This article discusses Alejandro Vallega’s book, Latin American Philosophy: From Identity to Radical Exteriority, proposing a series of questions in which the problem of situating Latin American thought in the topos of Western philosophy is addressed. Further questions considered here include how to rethink identity and difference from the perspective of Latin American experience, and, last but not least, what do “situated thinking” and “engaged thought” mean?
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  20.  2
    Towards a Situated Liberatory Aesthetic Thought.Alejandro A. Vallega - 2017 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 9 (2):184-194.
    The following response is divided in two parts. The first addresses some general issues about my Latin American Philosophy: From Identity to Radical Exteriority, which was the topic of a session at the 2015 meeting of the Society for Phenomenology and Existential Philosophy. The second takes up in depth a point from each speaker: the question of developing “situated thought” as a way to undo and overcome the exclusion of non-Westernized thought and experience ; and the introduction of a “decolonial (...)
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  21. Kitarō Nishida in der Philosophie des 20. Jahrhunderts: MIT Texten Nishidas in Deutscher Übersetzung. [REVIEW]Jason M. Wirth - 2017 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 9 (2):195-197.
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  22.  3
    Critical Philosophy of Race as Political Phenomenology: Questions for Robert Bernasconi.Direk Zeynep - 2017 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 9 (2):130-139.
    This article is a response to Robert Bernasconi’s critical philosophy of race. I start by speaking of the specific style in which life and philosophy are related in his work. I argue that he devises a political phenomenology which considers the lived experiences of racialization and inquires into their historical conditions, which have become “practico-inert” in facticity. Bernasconi’s thesis that the history of race is not determined by racial essentialism and his account of race as a border concept call for (...)
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  23. New Developments in Zhu Xi Studies: A Hermeneutical Study of Returning to Zhu Xi.Diana Arghirescu - 2017 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 9 (1):88-95.
    This essay presents and examines the book Returning to Zhu Xi: Emerging Patterns within the Supreme Polarity edited by David Jones and Jinli He. I argue that the contributions introduce new conclusions of the investigations on Zhu Xi’s thought, made during the last 30 years, thus continuing the previous scholarly dialogue initiated by Wing-tsit Chan. I then examine the new translations of Zhu Xi’s main terms proposed in this volume, as well as the topics proposed by the contributors. I conclude (...)
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  24.  1
    Flower of the Desert: Giacomo Leopardi’s Poetic Ontology. [REVIEW]Antonio Calcagno - 2017 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 9 (1).
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  25.  6
    Galen Strawson is a Closet Existentialist; or, the Ballistics of Nothingness.Cruz Cora - 2017 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 9 (1).
    The subject of free will has suffered something of a renascence in recent popularized American philosophy. The issue is, of course, a Gordian knot of underlying metaphysical and ontological presupposition, in both the analytic and continental traditions. In this paper, I attempt a bit of an untangling, and in doing so, I find that the fundamental position of the contemporary champion of “no freedom” (Galen Strawson) is not only compatible with a radical Sartrean freedom, but that the two philosophers’ deeper (...)
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  26.  4
    St. Vitus’s Women of Color: Dancing with Hegel.M. Hall Joshua - 2017 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 9 (1).
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  27. How to Do Things with Rancière.Matthew Lampert - 2017 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 9 (1):96-106.
    Devin Zane Shaw’s new book Egalitarian Moments is an attempt to think with and through Jacques Rancière. Shaw’s highly original interpretation of Rancière opens space within Rancière’s thought for a new, expanded account of the politics of art and literature, and Shaw is then able to use this theory as a way of rereading the history of philosophy. Shaw’s project is ultimately an attempt to show that it is possible to do philosophy in an egalitarian way – that not all (...)
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  28. Harmoneutics.Joshua Mason - 2017 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 9 (1):71-87.
    This paper examines the metaphor of harmony as a criterion of hermeneutic understanding. Taking harmony as a play of integrated parts within a dynamic whole, we can see the hermeneutic task of interpretation as a process of harmonizing parts meaningfully with each other and with the larger whole. Holding up a sufficiently rich notion of harmony as an ideal of interpretation can guide our hermeneutic practices. After distinguishing subtle differences in the Greek and Chinese conceptions of harmony, I argue that (...)
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  29. Nietzsche and the "Happiness of Repose".Morgan Rempel - 2017 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 9 (1):62-70.
    One of the more interesting aspects of the relatively unexplored topic of Nietzsche’s interest in Epicurus and Epicurean philosophy is his tendency to associate both with suffering. In this essay I examine a number of Nietzsche’s references to Epicurus and Epicureanism, paying particular attention to his recurring suggestion that both the foundation of this philosophy and its special appeal have much to do with the mitigation of suffering and the prospect of rest and contentedness. I also examine Nietzsche’s unusual suggestion (...)
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  30.  1
    Confucian Propriety and Ritual Learning: A Philosophical Interpretation.Ian M. Sullivan - 2017 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 9 (1).
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  31.  1
    A Community of the Question: On Philosophical Friends and Foes.K. P. Vanhoutte Kristof - 2017 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 9 (1).
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