Year:

  1. Shun Culture.Jesse Ciccotti - 2017 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 48 (4):181-188.
    ABSTRACTFollowing the cultural and social devastation of the mid-twentieth century, posttraditional, post-Marxist China is experiencing a resurgence of interest in numerous traditional cultural elements, including the figure of the ancient sage-king Shun through what is being called Shun Culture. This issue of Contemporary Chinese Thought is devoted to bringing this phenomenon to light as it is expressed among the intellectual elite of contemporary mainland China. This introduction highlights significant features of the discourse that occurs within this phenomenon, raising questions regarding (...)
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  2.  1
    The “Five Teachings” and “Bright Virtue” in Shun Culture”.Shang Hengyuan - 2017 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 48 (4):220-224.
    EDITOR’S ABSTRACTThis article attempts to demonstrate the practical relevance of Shun Culture and the values it embodies for the rejuvenation of China. The author focuses on the social relevance of family relationships through concepts such as justice, loyalty, and filial piety, and the political relevance of ruling virtuously.
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  3. The Cultural Content and Historical Impact of the Image of Emperor Shun.Zhou Jiachen - 2017 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 48 (4):225-231.
    EDITOR’S ABSTRACTIn this article Zhou Jiachen explores the various faces of Shun developed throughout history that are present today. He identifies three representations: Shun as a historical figure, Shun as a protagonist of myths and legends, and Shun as a cultural symbol. Zhou hopes that reviving interest in this ancient figure will provoke reflective thinking on what it means to be Chinese and will generate a critical and creative revival in Chinese culture.
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  4. On the Theory That “The Moral Culture of the Chinese People Originated in Shun Culture”.Zhang Jinghua - 2017 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 48 (4):232-242.
    EDITOR’S ABSTRACTIn this article Zhang Jinghua provides a stern critique of the idea that Shun Culture is the origin of Chinese moral culture. He provides abundant textual evidence to show that such generalized claims can be misleading, and points out the difficulty in drawing sweeping conclusions from terse ancient sources.
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  5.  2
    The Tradition of Shun Culture and the Modern Spirit.Wang Tiankui & He Hongbin - 2017 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 48 (4):189-212.
    EDITOR’S ABSTRACTIn this book excerpt, Wang Tiankui and He Hongbin set out to demonstrate both that Shun culture is the root of Confucian culture and that ethics sits at the core of Shun culture and all of Chinese culture. In both sections they cover a broad range of classical texts in support of their claim that understanding the essence of Shun culture is necessary to understanding the development of Confucian culture and Chinese civilization.
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  6. The Core Values of Shun Culture and Their Practical Significance.Chen Zhonggeng - 2017 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 48 (4):213-219.
    EDITOR’S ABSTRACTThis article by Chen Zhonggeng attempts to “fix the root” of Chinese culture in Shun Culture. He develops his argument through five core values of sincerity, filial piety, holding fast to the Mean, benevolence, and harmony, each of which he draws from a variety of classical texts. He closes by claiming that Shun should replace Master Kong as the true source of Chinese moral culture, and the foundation upon which future Chinese society should be built.
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  7.  1
    The Textual Transformation of the Laozi Through the Lens of History of Thought.Wang Bo - 2017 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 48 (3):115-128.
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  8.  3
    There Are Four Greats in the Realm”: Looking at the Evolution of the Laozi Text with Respect to Different Orderings of the “Four Greats.Chen Jing - 2017 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 48 (3):129-142.
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  9.  1
    A New Explanation of the Order of Parts in the Laozi.Liao Mingchun & Li Cheng - 2017 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 48 (3):143-158.
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  10.  2
    The Section Division of the Laozi and its Examination.Ding Sixin - 2017 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 48 (3):159-179.
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  11.  7
    Laozi Studies in the Twenty-First Century.Wu Xiaoxin & Carine Defoort - 2017 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 48 (3):111-114.
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  12.  5
    Chen Shaoming on the Methodology of Chinese Philosophy: Experience, Imagination, Reflection.Carine Defoort - 2017 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 48 (2):51-54.
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  13.  1
    A Phenomenological Analysis of Shame.Chen Shaoming - 2017 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 48 (2):55-67.
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  14.  3
    The Logic of Imagination: Classical Examples From Chinese Philosophy.Chen Shaoming - 2017 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 48 (2):68-79.
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  15.  1
    Further Reflections on the Methodology of Chinese Philosophical Research—Starting From Cashing in the “Bank-Note of Ideas”.Chen Shaoming - 2017 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 48 (2):80-94.
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  16.  2
    “I Lost Myself”: A Classical Idea of the Self.Chen Shaoming - 2017 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 48 (2):95-109.
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  17.  6
    After Revolution: Reading Rousseau in 1990s China.Els van Dongen & Yuan Chang - 2017 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 48 (1):1-13.
    ABSTRACTThis article reviews Zhu Xueqin’s writings on Jean-Jacques Rousseau against the background of the reception of Rousseau in China since the late nineteenth century. Rousseau was both an advocate and critic of the Enlightenment, and his work hence appealed to many Chinese intellectuals who struggled with the conundrum of how to modernize. During the late nineteenth century, Chinese supporters of Rousseau drew on his work to defend the viability of revolution. During the 1990s, following the tragedy of Tiananmen and the (...)
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  18.  4
    The Demise of the Republic of Virtue—From Rousseau to Robespierre.Zhu Xueqin - 2017 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 48 (1):14-35.
    This article contains the preface, introduction, and epilogue of Zhu Xueqin’s influential book The Demise of the Republic of Virtue: From Rousseau to Robespierre. In the preface, Zhu describes Chinese and international scholarship on Rousseau, his own intellectual formation as a member of the Cultural Revolution generation, and the overall purpose of the book. In the introduction, Zhu briefly outlines the transformation of medieval “theological politics” into modern “political theology,” or his central concern of the merger between moral idealism and (...)
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  19.  3
    The Institution of Church and State as One—An Analysis of Rousseau’s Political Philosophy.Zhu Xueqin - 2017 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 48 (1):36-50.
    In this article, Zhu Xueqin provides an overall view of Rousseau’s political philosophy as he discusses Rousseau’s notion of the general will, the social contract, and the differences between Rousseau and thinkers such as Hobbes and Locke. Zhu argues that Rousseau’s political philosophy is deeply flawed as it advocates a moralization of politics that seeks to build a heavenly kingdom on earth, an ideal that has left a significant imprint on the modern world.
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