Year:

  1. The History of Ideas in Pioneering Contemporary Chinese Art—Art History Writing and Relational Aesthetics.Zha Changping - 2016 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 47 (4):286-294.
    Zha Changping takes inspiration from Western art theories and applies them to a contemporary Chinese context. The article has an ontological perspective, discussing how the concept of “relational aesthetics” manifests in Chinese contemporary art. It also discusses its relation to the history of ideas. The focus is on art, but the ontological perspectives on creation and humanity are universal.
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  2.  2
    The Problem of All Problems.Bei Cun - 2016 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 47 (4):235-238.
    Bei Cun’s article is short and not written in an academic style but as a reflective essay. The essay is theological, discussing sin, authority, and resurrection, but it is also spiritually political, discussing how the Chinese people should choose its future path and what is true authority. It was originally published in the April 2011 issue of the lifestyle magazine Xinrui, not in a literary or philosophical journal.
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  3. Public Faith? Five Voices of Chinese Christian Thought.Fredrik Fällman - 2016 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 47 (4):223-234.
    ABSTRACTThe article sets Christianity into the perspective of contemporary China and its challenges, and discusses the role of intellectuals, from the “Cultural Christians” of the 1980s to the younger generation of “public intellectual” Christians of today. The five scholars represented in this issue are presented and put into context as voices in contemporary Chinese society.
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  4. Trinity Theology and the Gift Economy of Forming a Spiritual Authority.Xia Kejun - 2016 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 47 (4):270-285.
    Inspired by French scholar Marie-José Mondzain, this paper deals with the Holy Spirit and how the gift of the Spirit can provide for a different authority and economy. Xia also deals with the concept of icons and the Chinese concept of “face,” touching upon issues of identity and authority, and giving three Kantian “imperatives” for “spiritual” gift giving in the Chinese context.
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  5. Prophets: More Patriots Than Traitors?—A Discussion of Prophetic Patriotism Using the Prophet to the Nations, Jeremiah, as an Example.Liu Ping - 2016 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 47 (4):255-269.
    Liu Ping discusses patriotism and nationalism in regard to culture and values and also the role of the prophetic voice in Chinese society. His provocative allegorical rewriting of a prophecy from the Biblical book of Amos, setting it in contemporary China, is pointedly political. Liu writes in the Chinese intellectual tradition of pointing out when a society or a country is on the brink of destruction.
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  6. Spiritual Revival and Secularization: An Evaluation of House Churches in China.Yi Wang - 2016 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 47 (4):239-254.
    Wang Yi’s article deals with the role of house churches, that is, unregistered churches. In his evaluation of the different branches of house churches Wang Yi touches upon issues of identity and the future of China, and he also harshly criticizes the Chinese party-state, claiming that “China is becoming a tumor in the world.”.
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  7. The Concept of Democracy During the Transitional Period of Modern China.Huang Max Ko-wu - 2016 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 47 (3):186-207.
    EDITOR’S ABSTRACTIn this article, Huang discusses the process whereby the concept of democracy was translated into the Chinese context during the transitional period of modern China. He asserts that while democracy was rooted in a pessimistic conception of human nature and epistemology in the West, Chinese intellectuals rather tended toward an optimistic view of both, a fact that brought them closer to the Rousseauian tradition of democratic thought. However, Huang also sees signs of a Millianism with Chinese characteristics in the (...)
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  8. The Late Qing and Early Republican Conception of Democracy and its Origins.Max Ko-wu Huang - 2016 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 47 (3):166-185.
    EDITOR’S ABSTRACTIn this article, Huang provides a historical account of the way intellectuals have conceptualized democracy, representative assemblies, and political parties from the end of the Qing dynasty to the beginning of the Republican period. He outlines thirteen items that characterize Chinese democratic thought during this period, before tracing the historical origins of each.
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  9. Yan Fu and the Translation of “Individualism” in Modern China.Max Ko-wu Huang - 2016 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 47 (3):208-222.
    EDITOR’S ABSTRACTIn this article, Huang stresses the important role played by the Chinese cultural context in the historical process of translation of Western concepts. Huang exemplifies this point through an analysis of Yan Fu’s translation of “individualism.”.
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  10.  2
    Tradition and the Translation of Democracy During the Transitional Period of Modern China.Philippe Major - 2016 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 47 (3):153-165.
    ABSTRACTThis article argues that Anglophone works on Chinese democracy have tended to build their analyses on assumptions that tradition is either a premodern phenomenon unrelated to China’s democratization process, a hindrance that should be gotten rid of if China is to democratize, a static phenomenon that cannot but appear antiquated with regard to a dynamic, fast-paced modern China, or an object from which modern agents can freely draw. In order to challenge these assumptions, this article suggests that modernity and democracy (...)
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  11.  1
    Reflections on the Concept of “Law” of Shang Yang From the Perspective of Political Philosophy: Function, Value, and Spirit of the “Rule of Law”.Wu Baoping & Lin Cunguang - 2016 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 47 (2):125-137.
    EDITOR’S ABSTRACTThis article argues that Shang Yang’s philosophy of law was not only a means to enrich the state and strengthen its army, but also envisioned the orderly rule of all All-under-Heaven. Through a fair, universal, and reliable use of rewards, punishments, and also teaching, this vision of laws could ultimately lead to the promotion of moral values, popular consensus, and people’s self-governance. While the authors admit that in Shang Yang’s own historical context, law was no more than a tool (...)
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  12. Book of Lord Shang and Elevation of Confucianism in the Han—Including the Discussion of the Conflict Between Shang Yang, His School, and the Confucians.Li Cunshan - 2016 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 47 (2):112-124.
    EDITOR’S ABSTRACTThis article presents a counterintuitive view that the rise of Confucianism in the Han dynasty is indebted to the Book of Lord Shang. It analyzes chapter 7, “Opening the blocked,” and shows that the chapter can be read as promoting a combination of force and morality. The sophisticated historical view of this chapter solves apparent contradictions between societies based on family ties, meritocracy, and monarchic power by showing how new levels of social development inevitably open up when old paths (...)
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  13.  1
    Progress or Change? Rethinking the Historical Outlook of the Book of Lord Shang.Zhang Linxiang - 2016 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 47 (2):90-111.
    EDITOR’S ABSTRACTThis article is a reflection on the nature of “changing with the times” that is put forward in the Book of Lord Shang. The author challenges the modern, predominantly Marxist, portrayal of Shang Yang as the exceptional Warring States master promoting a progressive view of history. The Book of Lord Shang does not prioritize future over the present or present over the past, nor does it envision a large-scale rational understanding of the historical trends, nor the possibility to improve (...)
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  14. Chinese Academic Views on Shang Yang Since the Open-Up-and-Reform Era.Yuri Pines & Carine Defoort - 2016 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 47 (2):59-68.
    ABSTRACTThe Book of Lord Shang attributed to Shang Yang is one of the most controversial products of ideological debates in pre-imperial China. Forty years ago, Li Yu-ning summarized previous rounds of debates that peaked with the Shang Yang fervor of the early 1970s. The present article takes over where she ended, further exploring trends in studies of the Book of Lord Shang since the Open-up-and-Reform Era. The paper shows that despite a clear tendency of depoliticization of these studies, scholars are (...)
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  15. On the Composition of the “Attracting the People” Chapter of the Book of Lord Shang.Tong Weimin - 2016 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 47 (2):138-151.
    EDITOR’S ABSTRACTThis article argues on the basis of internal and external evidence that chapter 15 “Attracting the people” was written by a follower of Shang Yang in the later years of King Zhao of Qin. While the idea of attracting immigrants can be traced back to Shang Yang himself, the article dates the chapter seventy-eight years after his death.
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  16. Shang Yang as a Historical Personality and as a Symbol.Zeng Zhenyu - 2016 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 47 (2):69-89.
    EDITOR’S ABSTRACTThis article gives an overview of Shang Yang portrayals in four stages: from Han Fei’s sympathetic yet balanced assessment, passing over a variety of conflicting Han views, skipping through “the two millennia of vilification” to Zhang Taiyan’s rediscovery of Shang Yang, and ending up at the Shang Yang fervor of the 1970s. Zeng shows how the figure of Shang Yang keeps popping up with a certain regularity, inciting conflicts about his legacy. He also argues that at each flare of (...)
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  17.  7
    New Qing History and the Problem of “Chinese Empire”—Another Impact and Response?Li Aiyong - 2016 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 47 (1):13-29.
    EDITOR’ ABSTRACTLi Aiyong starts from a thorough analysis of the academic background, theories, and approaches of New Qing History. This suggests that its emergence in North America and the controversy it continues to cause in China have to be understood within the respective academic traditions and cultural environments and calls on Chinese academia to actively impact the writing of Qing history overseas.
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  18. Recent Additions to the New Qing History Debate.Mario Cams - 2016 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 47 (1):1-4.
    ABSTRACTThis introduction gives a brief overview of the articles included in this issue. It also briefly introduces both the general context of the New Qing History debate and its recent development.
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  19.  2
    Manchu Sinicization: Doubts on the Ethnic Perspective of New Qing History.Zhang Jian - 2016 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 47 (1):30-43.
    EDITOR’ ABSTRACTZhang Jian believes that an all too narrow definition of the word “sinicization” by New Qing historians has created a conflict where there is none, namely, between Manchu sinicization, properly understood, on the one hand, and Manchu ethnic identity on the other. Zhang argues that tensions can be seen as the result of “sociopolitical class-based differences between officials and citizens.”.
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  20.  2
    Moving Beyond “Sinicization” and “Manchu Characteristics”: Can Research on Qing History Take a Third Path?Yang Nianqun - 2016 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 47 (1):44-58.
    EDITOR’S ABSTRACTYang proposes to marry the many insights procured by New Qing History to the idea of “Hua-ization,” the alternative to the sinicization thesis, by internalizing the multidirectional blending of ethnic communities. This proposed third path would combine and integrate valuable insights from both the old Qing history and New Qing History schools.
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  21. “New Qing History”: An Example of “New Imperialist” History.Li Zhiting - 2016 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 47 (1):5-12.
    EDITOR’S ABSTRACTSeeing New Qing History as a “malicious attack on a sovereign country” by “Western imperialists,” Li explicitly differentiates between a “wrong” and a “right” perspective on Qing history. In his view, the only legitimate standpoint is one that takes the People’s Republic of China’s territorial reach and “ethnic unity” as a necessary and natural result of history.
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