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  1.  1
    When the Universal is Particular: A Re-Examination of the Common Morality Using the Work of Charles Taylor.Michelle C. Bach - 2022 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 25 (1):141-151.
    Beauchamp and Childress’ biomedical principlism is nearly synonymous with medical ethics for most clinicians. Their four principles are theoretically derived from the “common morality”, a universal cache of moral beliefs and claims shared by all morally serious humans. Others have challenged the viability of the common morality, but none have attempted to explain why the common morality makes intuitive sense to Western ethicists. Here I use the work of Charles Taylor to trace how events in the Western history of ideas (...)
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  2.  2
    Professionalism, Organizationalism and Sur-Moralism: Three Ethical Systems for Physicians.Jonathan Bolton - 2022 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 25 (1):153-159.
    Over the last 50 years, the term professionalism has undergone a widespread expansion in its use and a semantic shift in its meaning. As a result, it is at risk of losing its descriptive and analytical value and becoming instead simply an empty evaluative label, a fate described by C. S. Lewis as ‘verbicide’. This article attempts to rescue professionalism from this fate by down-sizing its extension and reassigning some of its work to two other ethical domains, introduced as the (...)
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  3. Responsible Nudging for Social Good: New Healthcare Skills for AI-Driven Digital Personal Assistants.Marianna Capasso & Steven Umbrello - 2022 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 25 (1):11-22.
    Traditional medical practices and relationships are changing given the widespread adoption of AI-driven technologies across the various domains of health and healthcare. In many cases, these new technologies are not specific to the field of healthcare. Still, they are existent, ubiquitous, and commercially available systems upskilled to integrate these novel care practices. Given the widespread adoption, coupled with the dramatic changes in practices, new ethical and social issues emerge due to how these systems nudge users into making decisions and changing (...)
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  4. The Concept of Social Dignity as a Yardstick to Delimit Ethical Use of Robotic Assistance in the Care of Older Persons.Nadine Andrea Felber, Félix Pageau, Athena McLean & Tenzin Wangmo - 2022 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 25 (1):99-110.
    With robots being introduced into caregiving, particularly for older persons, various ethical concerns are raised. Among them is the fear of replacing human caregiving. While ethical concepts like well-being, autonomy, and capabilities are often used to discuss these concerns, this paper brings forth the concept of social dignity to further develop guidelines concerning the use of robots in caregiving. By social dignity, we mean that a person’s perceived dignity changes in response to certain interactions and experiences with other persons. In (...)
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  5.  1
    Controversies Between Regulations of Research Ethics and Protection of Personal Data: Informed Consent at a Cross-Road.Eugenijus Gefenas, J. Lekstutiene, V. Lukaseviciene, M. Hartlev, M. Mourby & K. Ó Cathaoir - 2022 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 25 (1):23-30.
    This paper explores some key discrepancies between two sets of normative requirements applicable to the research use of personal data and human biological materials: the data protection regime which follows the application of the European Union General Data Protection Regulation, and the Declaration of Helsinki, CIOMS guidelines and other research ethics regulations. One source of this controversy is that the GDPR requires consent to process personal data to be clear, concise, specific and granular, freely given and revocable and therefore has (...)
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  6.  1
    Mechanisms of Defense in Clinical Ethics Consultation.Robert M. Guerin - 2022 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 25 (1):119-130.
    Clinical ethics consultants respond to a multitude of issues, ranging from the cognitive to the emotional. As such, ethics consultants must be prepared to analyze as well as empathize. And yet, there remains a paucity of research and training on the interpersonal and emotional aspects of clinical ethics consultations—the so-called skills in “advanced ethics facilitation.” This article is a contribution to the need for further understanding and practical knowledge in the emotional aspects of ethics consultation. In particular, I draw attention (...)
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  7.  3
    Tackling Vaccine Refusal.Henk ten Have & Bert Gordijn - 2022 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 25 (1):1-2.
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  8.  51
    Listening to Vaccine Refusers.Kaisa Kärki - 2022 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 25 (1):3-9.
    In bioethics vaccine refusal is often discussed as an instance of free riding on the herd immunity of an infectious disease. However, the social science of vaccine refusal suggests that the reasoning behind refusal to vaccinate more often stems from previous negative experiences in healthcare practice as well as deeply felt distrust of healthcare institutions. Moreover, vaccine refusal often acts like an exit mechanism. Whilst free riding is often met with sanctions, exit, according to Albert Hirschman’s theory of exit and (...)
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  9.  5
    Chatbot Breakthrough in the 2020s? An Ethical Reflection on the Trend of Automated Consultations in Health Care.Jaana Parviainen & Juho Rantala - 2022 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 25 (1):61-71.
    Many experts have emphasised that chatbots are not sufficiently mature to be able to technically diagnose patient conditions or replace the judgements of health professionals. The COVID-19 pandemic, however, has significantly increased the utilisation of health-oriented chatbots, for instance, as a conversational interface to answer questions, recommend care options, check symptoms and complete tasks such as booking appointments. In this paper, we take a proactive approach and consider how the emergence of task-oriented chatbots as partially automated consulting systems can influence (...)
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  10.  2
    The “Medical Friendship” or the True Meaning of the Doctor-Patient Relationship From Two Complementary Perspectives: Goya and Laín.Roger Ruiz-Moral - 2022 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 25 (1):111-117.
    This essay aims to broaden the understanding of the nature of the physician–patient relationship. To do so, the concept of medical philia that Pedro Laín Entralgo proposes is analysed and is considered taking into consideration the relational trait of the human being and the structure of human action as a story of the permanent tension that exists between freedom and truth, where the ontological foundation of the hermeneutic of the "Gift" and the analogy of “Love” as the central dynamic of (...)
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  11.  6
    Dying Like a Dog: The Convergence of Concepts of a Good Death in Human and Veterinary Medicine.Felicitas Selter, Kirsten Persson, Johanna Risse, Peter Kunzmann & Gerald Neitzke - 2022 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 25 (1):73-86.
    Standard views of good death in human and veterinary medicine considerably differ from one another. Whereas the good death ideal in palliative medicine emphasizes the positive aspects of non-induced dying, veterinarians typically promote a quick and painless killing with the aim to end suffering. Recent developments suggest a convergence of both professions and professional attitudes, however. Palliative physicians are confronted with patients wishing to be ‘put to sleep’, while veterinarians have begun to integrate principles and practices from hospice care. We (...)
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  12.  4
    Explaining Rule of Rescue Obligations in Healthcare Allocation: Allowing the Patient to Tell the Right Kind of Story About Their Life.Sean Sinclair - 2022 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 25 (1):31-46.
    I consider various principles which might explain our intuitive obligation to rescue people from imminent death at great cost, even when the same resources could produce more benefit elsewhere. Our obligation to rescue is commonly explained in terms of the identifiability of the rescuee, but I reject this account. Instead, I offer two considerations which may come into play. Firstly, I explain the seeming importance of identifiability in terms of an intuitive obligation to prioritise life-extending interventions for people who face (...)
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  13.  7
    Health and Disease as Practical Concepts: Exploring Function in Context-Specific Definitions.Rik van der Linden & Maartje Schermer - 2022 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 25 (1):131-140.
    Despite the longstanding debate on definitions of health and disease concepts, and the multitude of accounts that have been developed, no consensus has been reached. This is problematic, as the way we define health and disease has far-reaching practical consequences. In recent contributions it is proposed to view health and disease as practical- and plural concepts. Instead of searching for a general definition, it is proposed to stipulate context-specific definitions. However, it is not clear how this should be realized. In (...)
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  14.  5
    Feminist Approach to Geriatric Care: Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment, Diversity and Intersectionality.Merle Weßel - 2022 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 25 (1):87-97.
    Despite being a collection of holistic assessment tools, the comprehensive geriatric assessment primarily focuses on the social category of age during the assessment and disregards for example gender. This article critically reviews the standardized testing process of the comprehensive geriatric assessment in regard to diversity-sensitivity. I show that the focus on age as social category during the assessment process might potentially hinder positive outcomes for people with diverse backgrounds of older patients in relation to other social categories, such as race, (...)
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  15.  3
    Climate Change and the Different Roles of Physicians: A Critical Response to "A Planetary Health Pledge for Health Professionals in the Anthropocene".Urban Wiesing - 2022 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 25 (1):161-164.
    The article critically responds to "A Planetary Health Pledge for Health Professionals in the Anthropocene" which was published by Wabnitz et al. in The Lancet in November 2020. It focuses on the different roles and responsibilities of a physician. The pledge is criticised because it neglects the different roles, gives no answers in case of conflicting goals, and contains numerous inconsistencies. The relationship between the Planetary Health Pledge and the Declaration of Geneva is examined. It is argued that the Planetary (...)
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  16.  10
    Reconsidering Harm in Psychiatric Manuals Within an Explicationist Framework.Mia Biturajac & Marko Jurjako - 2022 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy.
    The notion of harm has been a recurring and a significant notion in the characterization of mental disorder. It is present in eminent diagnostic manuals such as DSM and ICD, as well as in the discussion on mental disorders in philosophy of psychiatry. Recent demotion of harm in the definition of mental disorders in DSM-5 shows a general trend towards reducing the significance of harm when thinking about the nature of mental disorders. In this paper, we defend the relevance of (...)
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