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  1. Mao’s Contributions to Marxism and Dialectical Materialism.Robert Elliott Allinson - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (3):203-231.
    This article raises the question of whether the thought of Mao Zedong is simply derivative from Marxist thought, whether it represents a deviation from Marxist thought, or whether it contains any original contribution to Marxist thought. It discusses such topics as Mao’s concepts of the principal and the non-principal aspect of the contradiction, Mao’s concept of permanent revolution, Mao’s replacement of the industrial proletariat with the peasant farmer class, Mao’s inversion of the classical Marxist position of the base determining the (...)
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  2.  2
    Wealth and Suffering.Werner Bonefeld - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (3):123-140.
    Karl Marx's Capital is critique of the capitalistically organised social relations of reproduction. It recognises economic categories as perverted social categories and asks about the manner in which human social practice manifests itself in the form of independent economic categories and laws that unfold as if governed by invisible principles. He says, the capitalist relations are beyond human control and he argues that the indi-viduals act under economic compulsion and are controlled by the products of their own labour. His critique (...)
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  3.  2
    Karl Marx: Praxis, Process, and Method.Kevin M. Brien - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (3):155-160.
    In Karl Marx’s “Preface” to the second edition of Capital, Volume 1, he famously wrote that with Hegel dialectical thinking is “standing on its head. It must be turned right side up again, if you would discover the rational kernel within the mystical shell.” Unfortunately, across a wide spectrum of interpretations of Marxism, there continues to be a great deal of confusion about what Marx means by the “rational kernel” that he discerns within the Hegelian “mystical shell.” But not just (...)
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  4.  2
    Karl Marx—Metaphor for Self-Empowerment and Liberation.Jean A. Campbell - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (3):179-184.
    This essay presents what is enduring and still powerful in Marx’s analysis of capital, viewed synthetically as the resulting moral imperative to fairness in the social relationships of production.
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  5. Rupturing the Dialectic.Harry Cleaver - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (3):11-53.
    In a period in which capital has been on the offensive for many years, using debt and financial crises as rationales for wielding austerity to hammer down wages and social services and terrorism as an excuse for attacking civil liberties, it is important to realize that the origins of this long period of crisis lay in the struggles of people to free their lives from the endless subordination to work within a society organized as a gigantic social factory. In both (...)
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  6. Dialogue and Universalism Editor’s Note.Małgorzata Czarnocka - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (3):5-5.
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  7. Subjection at the Very Core of the Production Process.Jean-François Gava - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (3):107-121.
    This paper takes place inside the theoretical frame restored after that the false secular Bortkiewicz-debate around the transformation problem has been solved in the years 1990 and whose flaw had not been identified for ages by most of Marxist economists, accepting its double accountancy of prices’ in money prices and workhours “prices”. Beyond the re-identification of finite values and prices, this paper aims at showing that, going back to a concept of value as an infinite working process which unifies money, (...)
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  8. Ecology/Ontology.Paul Guillibert & Frédéric Monferrand - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (3):245-251.
    Contemporary debates in political ecology tend more and more to be held on the ontological level, where they are recomposed around the following alternative: should one conceive of nature as the order of reality that transcends society and that should be protected from the excesses of the latter? Or should one renounce the very partitioning of nature and society itself in order to imagine new, more sustainable, ecological arrangements? Examining both Bruno Latour’s and Jason Moore’s takes on this alternative we (...)
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  9.  3
    Marx, Civilised or Savage?John Holloway - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (3):101-106.
    Capitalist civilisation is based on abstract labour. Mainstream Marxism has developed within a movement based on the defence of abstract labour and this has shaped its understanding. Savage Marxism starts from the first, not the second, sentence of Capital and moves against abstract labour through an underworld of categories usually neglected. Hope lies latent in this underworld.
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  10.  1
    Marxism, Socialism and Democracy.Renzo Llorente - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (3):141-154.
    Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels believed that their political project involved a commitment to democracy, and many subsequent Marxists have claimed that Marxism’s conception of socialism and communism represents a supremely democratic social arrangement. Many of Marxism’s critics, however, reject this belief, holding that the Marxist conception of socialism and communism entails anti-democratic policies, practices and institutions. While the position of Marxism’s critics is, without question, the predominant view today, it turns out that the arguments used to support this position (...)
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  11. The Problem of Overcoming in the Creative Legacy of Karl Marx.Andrey I. Matsyna & Anatoly B. Nevelev - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (3):233-244.
    The authors consider the phenomenon of overcoming and examines the culture of overcoming in Marxist dialectics. As the core thread for dealing with this issue in the writings of Karl Marx, the authors follows the research on the socio-biological problem carried out by Vladimir I. Plotnikov, a Russian representative of the Marxist dialectics. Examining Marx’s standpoint on the subject, Plotnikov provides an outline of the issue of overcoming. This issue is described as the issue of mankind overcoming its species’ boundaries (...)
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  12. The Political Implications of Marx’s Labour Theory of Value.Omer Moussaly - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (3):81-100.
    In economic history value theory is simply one paradigm amongst others. It refers to an ensemble of economic ideas developed by classical political economists such as Adam Smith and David Ricardo. In the works of Karl Marx, however, value theory takes on a new meaning. It is charged with political significance and relates directly to class struggles in modern society. In this paper we will explore some aspects of Marx’s critique of capitalism as interpreted by Harry Cleaver, Isaak Illich Rubin, (...)
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  13. Samuel Bailey and David Ricardo in Karl Marx’s Dialectic of the Form of Value.Tommaso Redolfi Riva - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (3):55-68.
    While Marx’s critique of David Ricardo is frequently debated, Marx’s critique of Samuel Bailey has, for far too long, remained in the shade. I try to show that Ricardo and Bailey represent two fundamental “moments” of Marx’s Darstellung. The word “moment” is here used in a non-generic sense: Ricardo’s and Bailey’s theories of value represent two opposite and contradictory sides of value’s category as presented in Marx’s critique of political economy. Building on the work of Hans Georg Backhaus, who claims (...)
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  14.  1
    Needs: Value in Command.Adolfo Rodríguez-Herrera - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (3):69-80.
    This paper reviews one of the mechanisms with which capital weaves a new type of subjection of the human being, the production of needs. Unlike other living beings, whose needs are determined by their biology, the human beings are the fruit of the social relations that they establish within their culture. Humans need objects, but their needs arise through the objects called to satisfy them, objects that in capitalist society are capital—value in the process of valorisation. In this way, need (...)
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  15. The Marxian Heritage.Halina Walentowicz - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (3):161-178.
    This paper focuses on some specific aspects of the theory developed by Karl Marx, who as a philosopher distanced himself from philosophy because he questioned its traditional forms. Marx postulated tying philosophical cognition to scientific study, he also strongly emphasised the importance of complementarity between social theory and social praxis. Marxism brought a breakthrough which paved the way for the philosophies of the 20th-century. The author devotes particular attention to Marxism’s forecasts, and concludes that, although Marx can be counted among (...)
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  16. Marx’s Concept of Ideology and Its Successors.Boyan Znepolski - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (3):185-202.
    The article aims at revealing the historical reinterpretations of one of social sciences’ key concepts, namely that of ideology. Referring to the analyses of Étienne Balibar and Jacques Derrida, it tries, firstly, to clarify the main moments of the Marxian concept of ideology. In Karl Marx’s view ideology is an expression of the social deformations of consciousness in class divided bourgeois society, while in the works of his disciples, among others Louis Althusser, the ideological phenomenon is generalized and conceived of (...)
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  17. Continuing Questions About Friendship as a Central Moral Value.Ruth Abbey - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (2):65-80.
    This article engages Friendship: A Central Moral Value by Michael H. Mitias. It questions Mitias’ distinction between friendship as a moral and theoretical concern as opposed to a practical one. It distinguishes the narrow from the wide meanings of philia in Aristotle’s approach. It looks at the resonances of classical approaches in later theories of friendship, while also attending to the innovations of later thinkers. It suggests that the moral paradigms Mitias delineates might not be as hegemonic nor as hermetically (...)
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  18.  2
    The Hegelian Phenomenological Exposition of the Problem of Social Identity.Daniel O. Adekeye - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (2):159-175.
    The process of constructing a social reality where “difference” becomes a social asset rather than a monster that threatens peace and progress must commence with a phenomenological understanding of social interactions within and among human societies. In my opinion, Hegel, more than any other thinker, has constructed a phenomenological framework that adequately captures and represents the nature of group interactions within human societies. This paper explores the Hegelian phenomenon of social identity, and, especially, characterizes the interactions between and among various (...)
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  19.  18
    Angelique: An Angel in Distress, Morality in Crisis.Necip Fikri Alican - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (2):9–48.
    Michael H. Mitias argues that friendship is a central moral value constituting an integral part of the good life and therefore deserving a prominent place in ethical theory. He consequently calls upon ethicists to make immediate and decisive adjustments toward accommodating what he regards as a neglected organic relationship between friendship and morality. This is not a fanciful amendment to our standard conception of morality but a radical proposal grounded in a unifying vision to recapture the right way of doing (...)
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  20.  1
    Plato’s Dialogues: Creating Friendship Bonds for 2400 Years.Martha C. Beck - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (2):99-118.
    This paper is about: a) the model of friendship bonds Plato presents to us through his character, Socrates; b) the kinds of friendship bonds Plato tried to create with his students and wanted his students to create when they returned home; c) the friendship bonds lovers of Plato’s dialogues have created with each other for 2400 years; and d) the bonds that those who want to imitate Socrates should create with all of their fellowcitizens. Such bonds are critical for sustaining (...)
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  21. A Portrait of Friendship.Manjulika Ghosh - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (2):81-97.
    This paper on friendship starts with noticing the cultural specificities of the words, “friend” and “friendship”: how they possess rich nuances and meanings in some cultures not available in others. It has then delved into Aristotle’s treatment of friendship in his three ethical treatises with special reference to the relationship between friendship and morality and that between friendship and self-knowledge. Some comments are made on whether friendship is possible between persons of unequal virtues and whether they are capable of attaining (...)
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  22.  2
    Can Humans and Robots Be Friends?Ben Mulvey - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (2):49-64.
    This essay engages the question whether it makes sense to talk about friendship between human beings and robots. Encountering the question of human and robot friendship, many might initially dismiss the possibility of such relationships out of hand. But such dismissals, it seems, based solely on the basis of species membership, are nothing more than unjustifiable speciesism. Mitias’s analysis of friendship is helpful, but makes the conditions for friendship demanding. Nevertheless, his framework implies that human and robot friendships are possible.
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  23. Striving to Moral Policy.Sergei Nizhnikov - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (2):119-131.
    The author investigates possible variants of the correlation between violence and nonviolence in politics. He bases on the scrupulous perusal of primary sources, and aspires to place accents on the concept of a humanistic policy. He asserts that the decision of modern global international and internal problems can be reached only on the basis on a humanistic policy of non-violence: nonresistance to the evil by violence that does not except, but sometimes need resistance to the evil by force. Principles of (...)
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  24.  1
    Natural Philosophy and Natural Science.Herbert Pietschmann & Hisaki Hashi - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (2):177-200.
    Since the 20th century the quantum physics has shown various phenomena, judged as “seldom and not easily understandable” by the theories of classic physics. From the beginning of the “Kopenhagener Deutung,” Einstein claimed against Heisenberg, Bohr, etc. that the particle physics lacks “physical reality.” A number of physicists have tried to clarify the labyrinth of particle as a minimal substance in the phenomena of the micro world. The entanglement of the “double particle” emitted from a π-meson in its teleportation is (...)
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  25.  1
    Heschel’s Disciples on Jewish-Christian Dialogue and Pope John Paul II.Shoshana Ronen - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (2):201-211.
    The article presents the conception of interreligious dialogue developed by Abraham Joshua Heschel in his legendary text No Religion Is an Island. Then, it illustrates the approach to this issue by the next generation of Jewish thinkers, Heschel’s disciples, Harold Kasimow and Byron Sherwin. Another interesting Heschel’s disciple is Alon Goshen-Gottstein who takes a step further in his explicating interfaith dialogue. The last part of the article analyses the understanding of Kasimow and Sherwin of the thought and deeds of Pope (...)
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  26. Personal Axiological Competence as a Component of Society’s Values Capital.Iryna V. Stepanenko - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (2):133-147.
    This paper argues that values if they are sheering through collective discussion and communicative-pragmatic justification have been proved to be a capital of society which forms the foundation and horizon for its sustainable development. The concept of personal axiological competence as an ability to produce and interiorize share values on the basis of their critical reflection, critical selection and integration has been developed by taking into account the specifics of the world of values in the context of globalization. A role (...)
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  27. Professional Culture and Professional Ethics.Elena Tashlinskaya - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (2):149-158.
    Norms and values set in professional ethics are viewed here as fundamentals of professional activity. Professional culture is a culture of thinking, acting and communicating. It arises from a specific professional work, its subject, methodology, and stylistic originality that allow to build ideal models of professional acting. Professional ethics lies at the intersection of the individual personal sphere, socially important results of professional activity and human values.
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  28.  3
    The Philosophy of the Not-Quite-Sufficient.Magdalena Borowska - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (1):159-176.
    The article explicates the main fields of hermeneutic research activity of Alicja Kuczyńska in which Neoplatonic inspirations, Renaissance models of life, and the values and traditional paradigms for understanding aesthetic categories that are dominant within them—such as image, creation, fiction, and mimesis—are viewed against the background of the phenomena, transformations, and problems that are unique to our own times, thereby providing old frameworks with new forms of philosophical relevance. Kuczyńska’s research topics, i.e. beauty, love, the anthropological dimension of creativity, the (...)
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  29.  4
    Art as a Philosophy.Małgorzata Czarnocka - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (1):5-7.
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  30.  2
    Hope in the Garden of Melancholy.Beata Frydryczak - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (1):205-216.
    Garden and melancholy have been analysed by Alicja Kuczyńska from the standpoint of Renaissance Neoplatonism. I try to work out a common denominator for them, and attempt to compare Renaissance and Romantic melancholy—in the garden space. I see a positive moment in the notions developed by Kuczyńska, namely in that melancholy, as an expectation, acquires a positive dimension, approaching hope.
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  31.  3
    The Labyrinth: Revisited and Reinhabited.Bogna J. Gladden-Obidzińska - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (1):177-194.
    This article reconstructs and interprets the evolution of the Minoan myth’s reception in literature, fine arts, and urban development during the twentieth century. The author’s understanding of this evolution is based on three assumptions: a) myth is a polysemantic symbol of metaphysical and historical origins and function; b) myth reflects the relationship of the cognitive vs. creative mechanisms of human activity; and c) as symbolic, myth’s form must be treated as an image as much as it is a narrative. As (...)
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  32.  2
    The Earthly Boundaries of Eternity.Roman Kubicki - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (1):229-241.
    While there are many stories of man, one moment seems to recur in all of them. This is the belief that we need to be able, and want, to look in the mirror of something that is qualitatively larger than us. This is the intention of the tradition whose philosophic patron is Plato. This need for unreality—the need for another world—presumably manifests itself in every area of human activity. One can therefore talk about a specific need for unreality that every (...)
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  33.  3
    Mysterious Energies. The Renaissance Gardens of Philosophers.Alicja Kuczyńska - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (1):41-59.
    In the Renaissance the beauty of a garden was for people a source of energy, it nurtured their inherent love of plant life, enchanted them and gave them a sense of pure aesthetic contentment. This fascination with nature and the values nurtured by the emerging culture of the garden also had broader reasons than just the desire for subjective experience. They can be sought in the belief that the style of an epoch is reflected not only in all the forms (...)
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  34.  1
    The Position of Aesthetics in the Early Renaissance and the Philosophy of Marsilio Ficino.Alicja Kuczyńska - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (1):61-76.
    Thee paper presents Marcilio Ficino’s aesthetics which is of a specific kind and differs from what we usually understand under the term. It expresses more than only thoughts on beauty and art, speaks about more than only the varieties of beauty, and deals with more than just the work of art—the object of art—and its relation to beauty. Traditional concepts played an important part in Ficino’s aesthetics, but alongside narrowly understood “proper” aesthetics, he offered another, very broad view of the (...)
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  35.  3
    Sweet Melancholia: The Melancholic “I”—Between Inspiration Source and Ailment.Alicja Kuczyńska - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (1):9-22.
    The paper examines the phenomenon of melancholia, taking into account views on it by Emil Cioran, Joseph Campbell, Jerzy Kosiński, Georg Simmel and Maurice Merleau-Ponty. Regardless of its commonly known clinical variant—which is not the subject of the presented reflections—melancholia has no clear philosophical definition, because its status usually resembles a clinging plant affixed to and “fed” by more concise thought constructs. It is demonstrated that the self-disclosure imperative is an essential aspect of melancholia and that a typical and frequent (...)
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  36.  3
    Melancholia and Hope: Alternatives or Opposites?Alicja Kuczyńska - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (1):23-40.
    This is the second part of the investigations of melancholia. Melancholia is examined here in relation to one of its opposition, namely hope. Reflection on melancholia entails reference to conditions commonly regarded as aggravating: sadness, uncertainty, indecision, self-criticism, despair, disenchantment, fear, desperation or bitterness. This content is common both to melancholia and hope; the difference lies in the kind of behaviour it evokes. Not yet either hope or melancholia, it is already conspicuously developing the characteristics of one of the options. (...)
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  37.  2
    The Faces of Eros.Alicja Kuczyńska - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (1):77-88.
    The paper examines the Renaissance philosophy of love, grasped as a “metaphysics of love.” Alongside its metaphysical interpretation, the phenomenon of Renaissance philosophy of love was subject to two other kinds of analysis: it was viewed either through the prism of its spiritual form, or as a fashionable social game which demanded that “every courtier recognise knowledge about how many and what varieties of love there are as necessary for his trade.” The author of the Renaissance theory of love was (...)
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  38.  4
    Symposium.Alicja Kuczyńska - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (1):103-114.
    The paper examines The Endless Column by Mircea Eliade and the main problem of this play, i.e. that of transcendence. It is shown that The Endless Column constitutes a summa of Eliade’s anthropological and philosophical ideas. Besides, the play refers to the indirect genetic determinants of the conception advanced in the play, pointing to its relations with certain currents of philosophical thought, like for example existentialism, structuralism, Indian philosophy or the philosophy of Neoplatonism.
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  39.  2
    Logos or Imago?Alicja Kuczyńska - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (1):89-102.
    In the Renaissance there was a kind of linguistic-pictorial osmosis, in which mythological configurations derived from antique literature, the poetic metaphoric of Neoplatonism, semi-fantastic and semi-realistic visions and a visible penchant for decorative rhetoric intertwined with elements of rational thought, the cult of nature, traditional reference to higher authority and practical as well as theoretical acceptance of pictorial symbolic. This language was employed to explore philosophical, ethical, and even natural categories related to issues like the beginnings of the world and (...)
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  40.  1
    The Paths of Early Pluralism. Polish Aestheticians Between Eras.Alicja Kuczyńska - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (1):125-136.
    Early artistic and aesthetic pluralism is not an accidental phenomenon in Polish aesthetic theories. This article shows its nineteenth and twentieth century origins and various theoretical considerations, and brings to the foreground the philosophical motifs entangled in the historical events of Poland. Cited documentary material focuses on two selected topics. They are: the philosophized version of history, in particular the multicultural history of aesthetics and the extended categorization of the active site of subjectivity.
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  41.  4
    The Status of History and the Subject of Aesthetics.Alicja Kuczyńska - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (1):137-150.
    The paper investigates changes in today aesthetics. It is demonstrated that the ongoing transformation of traditional aesthetics into aisthesis with its broader scope of influence calls for a review of to-date methodology in aesthetical research. Historical doxography, mere accounts of the past—even relating the most coherent and complete developments and events—hardly harmonise with the new approach to aesthetics, and could well distort and weaken it. The enlargement of the subject-matter of aesthetics and the clash between aesthetics and the aporias of (...)
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  42.  11
    Katarzyna Kobro. A Vision of the Open Sculpture.Alicja Kuczyńska - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (1):115-124.
    The paper is on Katarzyna Kobro’s artistic achievements and theoretical writings which present the foreshadowing of a new understanding of the space, articulated later by philosophers. Her and her husband conception of avant-garde sculpture postulates new mechanisms of seeing reality. By eliminating borders between sculpture and space, Kobro initiated a true breakthrough in art. Her achievement should be recognized for its truly pioneering and visionary status. Kobro was one of the first artists who revealed the intimate relation between art and (...)
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  43.  2
    Iunctim. An Essay on Alicja Kuczyńska’s Thought.Piotr Schollenberger - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (1):253-261.
    In this essay, I trace different motives in Alicja Kuczyńska’s thought that are linked together in her philosophy of image. According to Kuczyńska, the creative power of forming artistic images is deeply rooted in existential experience that can be described in terms of finitude, fragmentality, evanescence. The desire to find a way out of such a state is the origin of philosophical as well as artistic creation. It is hope which joins together the individual wish or desire and culture. Hope (...)
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  44.  1
    Logos, Justice, Pax Philosophica.Leszek Sosnowski - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (1):243-252.
    Aristotle’s concept of justice as an areté of logos is pinpointed in his main ideas. It serves as an introduction to the part of Pico’s philosophy. One of the main goals of his activity was to unify the ideas of Plato and Aristotle. The category of pax philosophica can be seen then as a test for the practical realisation of these ideas. Finally there are questions important for today’s man in the context of his present and future life. The most (...)
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  45.  2
    Alicja Kuczyńska’s Social Aesthetics.Irena Wojnar - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (1):217-227.
    The paper examines some rare specific features of Alicja Kuczyńska’s aesthetics. It is demonstrated that Kuczyńska connects the field of aesthetics to the realm of philosophical anthropology and social philosophy. Her interdisciplinary approach is based on postulated bonds between art, society, aesthetics and sociology.
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  46.  1
    The Black Stone of Melancholy.Anna Wolińska - 2018 - Dialogue and Universalism 28 (1):195-203.
    The subject of my analyses is the concept of melancholy developed by Alicja Kuczyńska. I am interested in the connection between the creative aspect of melancholy—understood as a certain kind of philosophical attitude—and the concept of a whole. Taking a whole to be an “ideal model in the evaluation of the world and of things” gives us an insight into the meaning of being provided by the philosophical attitude of melancholy. Kuczyńska believes the application of this model is connected both (...)
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