Christian Bioethics

ISSNs: 1380-3603, 1744-4195

18 found

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  1.  8
    Responding Faithfully to Women’s Pain: Practicing the Stations of the Cross.Sarah Jean Barton - 2023 - Christian Bioethics 29 (3):183-195.
    This essay explores the contemporary experiences of women who live with pain, given the complex responses they encounter within Western medical systems, including pervasive stigma, bias, clinician disbelief, and poor health outcomes. In response to these realities, as highlighted within recent literature and exemplified in a first-person account provided by the paper’s author, this essay explores the Christian practice of the Stations of the Cross as a faithful response to women living with pain. The Stations provide a distinctive Christian practice (...)
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  2.  6
    “But I Am Afflicted” Attending to Persons in Pain and Modern Health Care.Sarah Jean Barton & Brett McCarty - 2023 - Christian Bioethics 29 (3):177-182.
    Over one in five adults in the United States and around the world are estimated to live with chronic pain. How are we to attend well to persons living with pain? This is a difficult, pressing question for both healthcare institutions and Christian communities, and it is only made more complex both by the contemporary opioid crisis and by how experiences of pain and addiction are shaped in the American context by race, gender, and class. Attending faithfully to persons in (...)
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  3.  4
    Responding Wisely to Persistent Pain: Insights from Patristic Theology and Clinical Experience.Farr A. Curlin - 2023 - Christian Bioethics 29 (3):196-206.
    For most of the past generation, clinicians have been taught to treat patients' pain until the patient says it is relieved. The opioid crisis has forced both clinicians and patients to reconsider that approach. This essay considers how Christians in particular might assume and seek to overcome their experiences of persistent pain. Wise and faithful responses to pain, especially chronic pain, can take their bearings from how early Christians made sense of the place of both medicine and suffering in a (...)
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  4.  7
    Responding to People in Pain with Jane Austen’s Mansfield Park.Jaime Konerman-Sease - 2023 - Christian Bioethics 29 (3):207-220.
    Eliminating pain is problematic when it comes to caring for people with disabilities or chronic pain. This paper locates the drive to completely eliminate pain as a project of the Enlightenment and contrasts it with the tradition of interpreting suffering throughout the Christian tradition. I introduce Jane Austen’s novel Mansfield Park as a way to continue the tradition of interpretative suffering after the Enlightenment. Using textual analysis of Jane Austen’s Mansfield Park, I demonstrate how the novel’s heroine, Fanny Price, is (...)
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  5.  14
    Salvation and Health in Southern Appalachia: What the Opioid Crisis Reveals about Health Care and the Church.Brett McCarty - 2023 - Christian Bioethics 29 (3):221-234.
    This essay examines the interconnected nature of salvation and health, and it does so by engaging both recent qualitative research and three scriptural accounts from the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus. In doing so, the essay argues that salvation and health—and their conceptual pairings, sin and disease—are never individualistic. These realities are always cosmic, communal, and interpersonal, even as sin and disease are fundamentally disintegrating and isolating. The salvation and health of people suffering with substance use issues are bound (...)
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  6.  11
    Reclaiming Broken Bodies (or, This Is Gonna Hurt Some): Pain, Healing, and the Opioid Crisis.Joel James Shuman - 2023 - Christian Bioethics 29 (3):235-243.
    I argue here that the ways we experience, think about, and treat pain are bound up with sociocultural and technological phenomena that shape our desires and expectations. I propose a way of imagining caring for and offering healing to those who suffer pain informed by the Christian theological tradition. This way does not aspire to replace the care and healing made possible by modern medicine, but rather to place it within the common life of a community of mutual love, hospitality, (...)
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  7.  14
    Suffering Illness as an Ascetic: Lessons for Women in Pain.Devan Stahl - 2023 - Christian Bioethics 29 (3):244-255.
    Women’s pain remains underappreciated, undertheorized, and undertreated in both medicine and theology. The ascetic practices of women in pain, however, can help Christians understand and navigate their own pain and suffering, particularly because they are experienced in the context of chronic illness and disability. In what follows, I argue that Christians would do better to view the pain that accompanies disability and chronic illness as a potential resource for spiritual practice rather than an example of sin or evil. I begin (...)
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  8.  3
    Faithfully Describing and Responding to Addiction and Pain: Christian “Homefulness” and Desire.John Swinton & Emmy Yang - 2023 - Christian Bioethics 29 (3):256-266.
    This investigation develops in three steps. First, we seek to complexify the opioid crisis in a way that helps us to see how the issues of misguided desire and misplaced attachments are fundamentally important for a theological account of opioid addiction.1 Second, acknowledging the connections between pain and opioid addiction, we explore some of the ways in which our understanding of pain can influence our understanding of and responses to opioid use. Finally, we offer some tentative reflections on the theological (...)
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  9.  6
    “Sufficient for the day is its own trouble”: Medicalizing Risk and the Way of Jesus.Farr Curlin - 2023 - Christian Bioethics 29 (2):110-119.
    It is common wisdom that today’s medicine focuses too much on treating those who are sick and too little on preventing the sickness in the first place. This essay proposes that Jesus’ teaching in the Sermon on the Mount challenges that assumption and the preventive medicine to which it has given rise. In light of Jesus’ teaching, the essay identifies four apparent problems with much of preventive medicine. It then offers four heuristics that might form a basic Christian logic for (...)
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  10.  6
    Theological and Ethical Problems with Medicalizing Risk.Farr Curlin & Paul Scherz - 2023 - Christian Bioethics 29 (2):105-109.
    While the COVID-19 pandemic riveted public attention on questions regarding how to respond reasonably to risk of illness, everyday medical care involves more mundane forms of pharmaceutical risk management for conditions like high blood pressure, prediabetes, or high cholesterol. This essay, and the collection it introduces, explore medicalization of risk as a theological problem, drawing on resources such as the Sermon on the Mount that caution us about the potential dangers of risk management to Christian discipleship. Medicalization of risk threatens (...)
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  11.  5
    Theology, Medicalization, and Risk: Observations from the New Testament.C. Kavin Rowe - 2023 - Christian Bioethics 29 (2):120-128.
    This article reflects on the intersection of the New Testament’s witness with current questions of illness, medication, risk, luck, death, and hope. Drawing principally on the Gospel of Matthew and the letters of Paul, I argue that, for Christians, hope in the resurrection—not the ability to avoid suffering and death—provides the best context for prudential judgment in light of the inscrutability of the future and the concomitant opacity that attends medical decision-making. We do not and will not know what we (...)
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  12.  73
    What Does it Mean to be Contrary to Nature?David Bradshaw - 2023 - Christian Bioethics 29 (1):58-76.
    St. Paul says that same-sex sexual acts are “contrary to nature.” Plainly this is intended as a condemnation, but beyond that its meaning is obscure. In particular, we are given no general account of what it means to be contrary to nature, including what other acts might fit this description. This article attempts to provide such an account. It relies for this purpose on the biblical and classical sources of this idiom as well as its subsequent use within the Greek (...)
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  13.  5
    Finding the Way Towards a Better Medicine: A Review of: Curlin and Tollefsen. 2021. The Way of Medicine: Ethics and the Healing Profession. Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press. ISBN-10: 0268200866. [REVIEW]Joshua Briscoe - 2023 - Christian Bioethics 29 (1):95-104.
    In writing The Way of Medicine: Ethics and the Healing Profession, Farr Curlin and Christopher Tollefsen have provided a helpful, accessible resource for clinicians seeking to conscientiously practice medicine in pursuit of health. These authors identify a major threat to such a practice, which they call the provider of services model (PSM), and compare it to a historic way of practicing that they seek to recover, called the Way of Medicine. Throughout the book, they contrast the PSM and the Way (...)
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  14.  4
    Foundations of Christian Bioethics: Metaphysical, Conceptual, and Biblical.Mark J. Cherry - 2023 - Christian Bioethics 29 (1):1-10.
    How can we definitively determine which biomedical choices are morally correct and which engage in seriously wrongful acts? Depending on whom one asks, one is informed that choices such as abortion, euthanasia, and significant body modification involve real moral harm (either as forms of murder or as denying the goodness of the body that God has provided), or that disallowing such “medical care” violates the basic rights of persons (where abortion, active euthanasia, and body modification are appreciated as positive expressions (...)
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  15.  85
    Christianity and Psychedelic Medicine: A Pastoral Approach.Bryan McCarthy - 2023 - Christian Bioethics 29 (1):31-57.
    In recent years, researchers in the “psychedelic renaissance” have been reinvestigating the therapeutic potential of psychedelic compounds for conditions like post-traumatic stress disorder, clinical anxiety/depression, and addiction. Each of these has treatment-resistant cases, sometimes decades in the making, but studies employing psychedelics to address them are yielding impressive results. Given the evolving legal situation around these substances as well as corporate investment in them, their availability and appeal promise to increase. The question facing Christians is: How do these developments impact (...)
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  16.  17
    Why Biblical Arguments for Abortion Fail.Calum Miller - 2023 - Christian Bioethics 29 (1):11-20.
    While the traditional Christian teaching opposing abortion has been relatively unanimous until the twentieth century, it has been claimed in more recent decades that certain Biblical passages support the view that the fetus, or unborn child, has a lesser moral status than a born child, in a way that might support the permissibility of abortion. In this paper, I address the foremost three texts used to argue this point: Genesis 2:7; Exodus 21:22–25; and Numbers 5:11–31. I argue that interpreting the (...)
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  17.  11
    A Reexamination of In Vitro Fertilization.Michael G. Muñoz - 2023 - Christian Bioethics 29 (1):21-30.
    For the sake of consistency with settled principles from other theological and ethical questions, there is a need for a Christian reexamination of in vitro fertilization (IVF). Both Old and New Testaments demonstrate that human personal life begins at conception or fertilization. Additionally, the Bible teaches that human beings are persons in the image of God from the very beginning of their existence. Thus, it can be concluded that the embryos created via IVF are persons in God’s image. Applying this (...)
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  18.  29
    Personal Identity, Sexual Difference, and the Metaphysics of Gender.Jeremy W. Skrzypek - 2023 - Christian Bioethics 29 (1):77-94.
    Issues pertaining to sex and gender continue to be some of the most hotly debated topics of our time. While many of the most heated disputes occur at the level of politics and public policy, metaphysics, too, has a crucial role to play in these debates. In this essay, I explore several key metaphysical debates concerning sex and gender through the lenses of two important areas in contemporary metaphysics: the metaphysics of essence and the ontology of the human person. The (...)
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