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  1.  4
    Between Real and Virtual, Map and Terrain: ScanLab Projects, Post-Lenticular Landscapes.Peter Ainsworth - 2019 - Philosophy of Photography 10 (2):269-281.
    London-based company ScanLab Projects is a multi-disciplinary commercial collaboration between architect, artist, coders and designers who utilize technologies surrounding 3D laser scanning in their practice. Inherent in the manner their projects are pitched is through reference to the photographic as technological process. Central to their engagement with the light detection and ranging scanning apparatus is a consideration of the relationality between virtual or digital object and what could be determined as extrinsic or ‘real’ terrain. In Post-lenticular Landscapes, 2017, ScanLab created (...)
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  2.  7
    Miki Kratsman and Shabtai Pinchevsky: The Anti-Mapping Project.Andrew Fisher - 2019 - Philosophy of Photography 10 (2):243-268.
    This article introduces an evolving project of visual mapping initiated by Israeli photographers Miki Kratsman and Shabtai Pinchevsky under the title of Anti-Mapping. Placing this critical project in the context of the Israel/Palestine conflict, the article examines how Kratsman and Pinchevsky develop complex, strategic and critically sophisticated approaches to visualizing the conditions that produce victims of violence and that place Palestinian villages under threat of destruction. The article explores their strategic, technical and critical approaches to the difficulties of representing particular (...)
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  3.  2
    Potential History: Unlearning Imperialism, Ariella Aïsha Azoulay.Alex Fletcher - 2019 - Philosophy of Photography 10 (2):283-288.
    Review of: Potential History: Unlearning Imperialism, Ariella Aïsha Azoulay London and New York: Verso, 656 pp.,ISBN 978-1-78873-571-1, p/bk, £30.00.
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  4.  4
    Anti-Mapping.Miki Kratsman & Shabtai Pinchevsky - 2019 - Philosophy of Photography 10 (2):229-242.
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  5.  2
    Memory, Bernadette Mayer.Louisa Lee - 2019 - Philosophy of Photography 10 (2):293-296.
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  6.  7
    The Body as a Data Set.Daniel Rubinstein - 2019 - Philosophy of Photography 10 (2):225-227.
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  7.  1
    Performing Image, Isobel Harbison.Frida Sandström - 2019 - Philosophy of Photography 10 (2):289-292.
    Review of: Performing Image, Isobel Harbison Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 256 pp.,ISBN 978-0-26203-921-5, h/bk, £32.00.
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  8.  2
    The Time(s) of the Photographed.Reza Tavakol - 2019 - Philosophy of Photography 10 (2):195-206.
    The relationship between the photographic and optical images and time has been the subject of great deal of debate. Despite their differences, what many of these considerations have in common is their focus on the receiver, whether mechanical, biological, social or the memory and imagination of the observer. My aim here is to shift the emphasis from the receiver to the object or vista that is photographed or viewed and to explore how the constraints implied by our modern understanding of (...)
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  9.  2
    Landscape as a Twist of Thought: A Line of Enquiry.Susan Trangmar - 2019 - Philosophy of Photography 10 (2):207-224.
    How can an art practice based upon lens imaging help us to question landscape as a pictorial category fixed in space and time? This article proposes that we practise landscape as an ongoing process that always surpasses human spatial and temporal framing while enfolding the activity of the human within it. Starting with reference to a specific geographic, geological and environmental site, the article tracks a process of situated making using the smartphone camera as the fulcrum of a performative activity.
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  10.  3
    Socially Latent Images: Eva and Franco Mattes’s Personal Photographs.Kate Warren - 2019 - Philosophy of Photography 10 (2):171-194.
    The age of ubiquitous photography has not only embedded the ability to easily share photographs, it has also constructed widespread expectations of content being shared. Such presumptions of sharing are profoundly influencing our relationship with photography, particularly as the hypervisibility of shared images produces an increasingly unstable invisibility of ‘unshared’ images. These contemporary concerns can be productively explored and theorized by considering the work of artists Eva and Franco Mattes. In recent works that use personal photographs, the Matteses reveal prescient (...)
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  11.  10
    The Divisive Moment.Bernd Behr - 2019 - Philosophy of Photography 10 (1):7-10.
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  12.  7
    Photographic Art and Technology in Contemporary India.Aileen Blaney - 2019 - Philosophy of Photography 10 (1):23-40.
    The algorithmic turn in photography raises the question of whether an algorithmically generated image is even a photograph at all. This paradox is abundant on India's urban streets, where the pedestrian or road user is met with giant photo saturated flex hoardings printed with political and community messages and photo-shopped portraits of gods, chief ministers and party workers. In this article, attention to photo-based political posters alongside art practices sharing common elements of digital capture and postproduction contextualizes a reading of (...)
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  13.  15
    Between Nature and Culture: Jakob von Uexküll's Concept of Umwelten and How Photography Shapes Our Worlds.Joachim Froese - 2019 - Philosophy of Photography 10 (1):11-22.
    This article addresses traditional perceptions about photography's position between nature and culture and concomitant schools of thinking focusing pre-dominantly on the photographic image as a form of visual representation. Aiming to develop an alternative perspective it considers a biosemiotic approach and turns to Jakob von Uexküll's model of subjective sentient worlds that critically dissolves the perceived dualism between nature and culture that has also underpinned most theoretical thinking about photography in the past. Today photography is largely embedded into social media (...)
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  14.  8
    This Misery of Light ‐ Light as Destruction in the Work of Lina Selander.Erika Larsson - 2019 - Philosophy of Photography 10 (1):115-131.
    In this article I look at two works by Swedish video artist Lina Selander and explore how underlying visual patterns unfold in these works that are connected to certain worldly phenomena. Borrowing from Jacques Derrida, I describe the tendency of being en mal d'archive as an obsession to structure the world into particular recognizable patterns. I argue that Selander's works can be understood as the unfolding of such structures, the result being that the very impulse itself, the obsession Derrida speaks (...)
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  15.  12
    Rephotograph.Gary McLeod - 2019 - Philosophy of Photography 10 (1):89-99.
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  16.  6
    You Are My Territory.Liz Orton - 2019 - Philosophy of Photography 10 (1):73-88.
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  17.  12
    Adrian Piper's Aesthetic Agency: Photography as Catalysis for Resisting Neo-Liberal Competitive Paradigms.Gerlinde Van Puymbroeck - 2019 - Philosophy of Photography 10 (1):41-58.
    Contemporary neo-liberal society is ruled by the market. Davies, Chen and Lentin and Titley show that its objectification and categorization founds a competitive notion of agency that disables subjective construction of self and intersubjective understanding of the world. As the market's rules and norms are set by white patriarchy, its competitive paradigm structurally disadvantages others. Art too is objectified and categorized by neo-liberal institutions, equally embedded in white patriarchal market structures and severely limiting democratic public access to a diverse artistic (...)
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  18.  6
    Photographic Manipulation in the Health, Clinical and Biomedical Sciences.Catherine Schneider, Sydney Hoffmann & Graham D. Rowles - 2019 - Philosophy of Photography 10 (1):59-71.
    Photography has become a pervasive component of contemporary communication. Recent technological advances in creating and manipulating images have provided renewed impetus to decades-long debates on use of photographs in science. With increase in the potential for inappropriate image manipulation, fears about misrepresentation have heightened concern among journal editors and scholars about the 'accuracy' of published images. We discuss how science has responded to growing concerns surrounding falsification and inaccuracy of photography. We document progress in implementing a variety of complementary approaches (...)
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  19.  5
    #Prank4offices.Philip Welding - 2019 - Philosophy of Photography 10 (1):101-113.
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  20.  8
    Where is the Photography of Non-Photography?Ed Whittaker - 2019 - Philosophy of Photography 10 (1):133-150.
    François Laruelle's writing on Non-Photography is examined from its ontological condition to its desired form of a unity derived from the work of Kant, discussing precisely how the logic of transcendence and the ontology of immanence central to Laruelle's theory impact on how the photographic image is incontrovertibly involved with Kant's paradox of appearance and reality. In a context of burgeoning technoscience, which lays bare the meaning of Non-Photography for the seemingly impossible reversion to actual photography, the article goes on (...)
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