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  1.  2
    New Facts Emerge: An Interview with Dave Beech.Dave Beech & Alex Fletcher - 2020 - Philosophy of Photography 11 (1-2):7-28.
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  2.  6
    Three Scale Models for a Photographic World: Benjamin, Constellation, Image and Scale.Andrew Fisher - 2020 - Philosophy of Photography 11 (1-2):49-67.
    This article sets out to substantiate an understanding of the photographic image as a constellation of scaled relations, with a focus on the significance of historically neglected questions of scale in and for the present. It explores two recurrent themes in Walter Benjamin’s writings: his celebrated methodological-epistemological concept of constellation and his less often remarked fascination for relationships of scale, processes of scaling and the scale effects these produce. These are investigated in light of the mutable and composite character of (...)
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  3.  3
    Photography From the Turin Shroud to the Turing Machine, Yanai Toister.John Lechte - 2020 - Philosophy of Photography 11 (1-2):137-141.
    Review of: Photography from the Turin Shroud to the Turing Machine, Yanai Toister Bristol and Chicago, IL: Intellect, p/bk, 215 pp., ISBN 978-1-78938-156-6, p/bk, £37.
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  4.  4
    Theory of the Image, Thomas Nail.Noa Levin - 2020 - Philosophy of Photography 11 (1-2):133-136.
    Review of: Theory of the Image, Thomas Nail New York: Oxford University, 432 pp., ISBN 978-0-19005-008-5, p/bk, £19.99.
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  5.  4
    Photographocene: The Past, Present and Future in the Photography of the Environment.Ana Peraica - 2020 - Philosophy of Photography 11 (1-2):99-111.
    Photography has an important place in picturing and documenting environmental changes, especially when they occur in distant areas, or are inaccessible from ground level and/or imperceptible to the naked eye due to their scale. As the invention of photographic technology was officially registered only 55 years after the invention of the steam engine, most subsequent transformations of the environment have been well documented. One needs to distinguish the time of human changes to the environment, the Anthropocene, from images of the (...)
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  6.  2
    The Assassination of Experience by Photography.Daniel Rubinstein - 2020 - Philosophy of Photography 11 (1-2):113-120.
    This article suggests that when the engagement with photography is limited to questions of recognition and resemblance, such approach stifles our experience of the world and directs us towards monotonous homogeneity in which everything can be represented in a photograph, and a photograph is always a representation of something or other. And yet, a photograph has the potential to move our gaze beyond representation of events and situations in a way that allows us to penetrate the appearance of things and (...)
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  7.  6
    World Without Colour and its Photographs and Optical Images.Reza Tavakol - 2020 - Philosophy of Photography 11 (1-2):79-97.
    Photographs and optical images, whatever their contents, are imprints of the electromagnetic waves in the visible range of wavelengths, we refer to as light. Furthermore, they are designed to portray different parts of the visible light in terms of different colours, in analogy with the human eyes, however imperfectly. The world outside our eyes and cameras, however, is permeated by electromagnetic waves with much wider spectrum of wavelengths than those in the visible range. Importantly also, colour is a construct of (...)
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  8.  4
    Documents of Doubt: The Photographic Conditions of Conceptual Art, Heather Diack.Thomas Watson - 2020 - Philosophy of Photography 11 (1-2):142-147.
    Review of: Documents of Doubt: The Photographic Conditions of Conceptual Art, Heather Diack Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press, 296 pp., ISBN 978-1-51790-757-0, p/bk, $30.00.
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  9. Pow! Pow!Neale Willis - 2020 - Philosophy of Photography 11 (1-2):69-77.
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  10.  2
    Roy DeCarava: Eyes to Hear.Andrew Witt - 2020 - Philosophy of Photography 11 (1-2):29-48.
    This article examines the belated reception and occlusion of the photographic work of Roy DeCarava by evaluating two recent publications: The Sound I Saw: Improvisations on a Jazz Theme and Light Break. In the article, I attend to the ways in which DeCarava’s closely cropped photographs delve into the sensual, private textures of everyday life but also track as well the collective anguish and social discontent that still burns on today.
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  11.  5
    Cite, Plagiarize, Pass-Off: Deixis, Bibliographic Imposture and Photography.David Zeitlyn - 2020 - Philosophy of Photography 11 (1-2):121-132.
    In this essay I want to take some metaphors seriously. I want to push at their limits and ask whether this exercise can help us think differently about photographs and their relationship to what they depict. (Should it be ‘what they depict’ or ‘what they are seen as depicting’? The choice of phrasing depends on theoretical position: is depiction inherent in the image, or is it seen by the viewer?). The moel of citationality based on Cadava’s work is developed by (...)
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