Philosophy of Photography

ISSN: 2040-3682

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  1.  6
    ‘I am not data’: A GAN simulation in tandem with Second Nature.Mónica Alcázar-Duarte - 2023 - Philosophy of Photography 14 (2):271-282.
    ‘I am not data’ has been produced in collaboration with a creative coder from the Netherlands. Over a period of six months around 4600 images were chosen from approximately 20,000 images of LatinX femmes. The images were then fed into a generative adversarial network (GAN) simulation that produced this film. The resulting work seeks to elucidate a process of lumping together foreign bodies as a method of amalgamation that works to create ‘new’ information. It exists in tandem with ‘Second Nature’, (...)
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  2.  8
    On Thunderclouds.Nanna Debois Buhl - 2023 - Philosophy of Photography 14 (2):171-179.
    Landscapes and atmospheric processes are rapidly changing, and so are the technologies we use to depict and detect them. How to ponder these transformations through artistic thinking and making? In the artwork On Thunderclouds, I examine the thundercloud as aesthetic motif, meteorological phenomenon, and as an ominous sign of climate change. In the making of the work, the tension between prediction and unpredictability on a larger level is mirrored in my working process, a balancing act between setting up systems and (...)
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  3.  10
    Photographing the game glitch: Between ghost photography and immaterial labour.Marco De Mutiis - 2023 - Philosophy of Photography 14 (2):153-170.
    This article explores the properties of glitch within practices of in-game photography. It argues that capturing the breaking of game textures and graphics reveals the process of creation of photorealism and the remediation of traditional photography within digital and playable spaces. On the other hand, it proposes that screenshotting game glitches acts as an involuntary bug report and part of an economy of ever-optimizing networked images.
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  4.  11
    The politics of glitch in online networked images.Annet Dekker - 2023 - Philosophy of Photography 14 (2):229-249.
    Rosa Menkman proposed that the concept of glitch should be considered a tipping point, a momentum, that can be seized, in which the power of subjectivity and the collaborative efforts of creators and the active spectators take centre stage. This article will discuss how in the last decades the glitch as noise and techne has shifted towards glitch as precarious aesthetics and how it has become associated with decolonial and feminist modes of critique. While the glitch is still seen as (...)
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  5.  11
    The Atlas of Death.Olle Essvik - 2023 - Philosophy of Photography 14 (2):217-228.
    In a number of works of art, I have taken an interest in insects, bookworms that eat books, electronics as anatomy and clever robots whose actions in a way resemble the apparently primitive abilities of insects. This text has its starting point in two works of art, Eaten Books and Atlas of AInsects. In the artworks, I am interested in insect anatomy and insects as symbols of decay, survival, extinction, death and post humanity. The text is originally from an artistic (...)
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  6.  8
    After the glitch: Photographic friction in Lisa Tan’s Dodge and/or Burn.Vendela Grundell Gachoud - 2023 - Philosophy of Photography 14 (2):251-270.
    This article aims to analyse how a photographic interaction, complicated by technical and bodily disruption, entails a productive glitch in the form of systemic friction. The analysis is grounded in artist Lisa Tan’s exhibition Dodge and/or Burn in Stockholm (2023–24), with a focus on a central video work. The exhibition’s theme of crisis and transformation guides the analysis within a qualitative framework informed by an art historical methodology of semiotics and phenomenology combined with media and disability studies. This interdisciplinary perspective (...)
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  7.  15
    Photography and the glitch.Nina Mangalanayagam & Louise Wolthers - 2023 - Philosophy of Photography 14 (2):141-151.
    Within the last decade, a growing number of artists, media activists and theorists have been engaged with the potential of the glitch – with processes and aesthetics that arise from visual errors in digital technologies. But glitches also offer clues to understanding normative knowledge and power systems, and to challenge these. This is relevant in critical approaches to photography and its historical role in forming, controlling and colonizing systems as well as conventional understandings of the medium as a transparent window (...)
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  8.  17
    Insect media and photography: An interview with Jussi Parikka.Jussi Parikka, Nina Mangalanayagam & Louise Wolthers - 2023 - Philosophy of Photography 14 (2):201-216.
    Among one of the main inspirations for the research behind this Special Issue is Jussi Parikka’s 2010 book Insect Media: An Archeology of Animals and Technology. In this interview, the guest editors, Nina Mangalanayagam and Louise Wolthers, ask Professor Parikka to revisit some of the book’s core issues in relation to digital photography and the current media landscape in general. The conversation also revolves around artificial intelligence (AI), bugs, mimicry, contemporary art as well as scale and operational images, which reflect (...)
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  9.  10
    New visions, new ecologies: On materialities and atmospheres in contemporary photography.Susanne Østby Sæther - 2023 - Philosophy of Photography 14 (2):181-200.
    This article proposes to reconceptualize the Hungarian photographer, artist and educator László Moholy-Nagy’s (1895–1946) inter-war call for a ‘new vision’ in order to grasp how artists presently experiment with photography and adjacent new technologies to explore the environmental, ecological and elemental dimension of media themselves. For Moholy-Nagy, photography represented a new way of seeing and experiencing the increasingly industrialized and automated world and a means of expanding our sensory perception. Drawing on recent scholarship of elemental media theory, I adapt Moholy-Nagy’s (...)
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  10.  11
    Corrupting data and sensing error, or how to ‘see’ digital images.Magdalena Tyżlik-Carver - 2023 - Philosophy of Photography 14 (2):283-300.
    In response to calls to forget and unthink photography this article considers the computational environment and its consequences for the image making. What is there to know about images that are networked and generated with data processing techniques rather than with light and chemistry? How to analyse images and read what they are and what they represent, beyond what is visible in the picture? The article argues that glitches while aesthetically capturing errors in the machine point to broader conditions of (...)
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  11.  10
    Capitalism and the Camera: Essays on Photography and Extraction, Kevin Coleman and Daniel James (eds) (2021).Simon Constantine - 2023 - Philosophy of Photography 14 (1):124-128.
    Review of: Capitalism and the Camera: Essays on Photography and Extraction, Kevin Coleman and Daniel James (eds) (2021) London and New York: Verso, 320 pp., ISBN 978-1-83976-080-8, p/bk, GBP 19.99.
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  12.  8
    Archival violence.Paul Grace - 2023 - Philosophy of Photography 14 (1):67-83.
    Photographs of violence carry an implicit critique of the social order from which they emerge. This necessitates the systemic management of their affect. Recognition of the experience carried by these signals has the potential to catalyse and contribute to emancipatory thought and action. The apparatus of epistemic control – characterized here as the Archive – has evolved to neutralize their affective potential. Certain artworks that reconfigure photographs of violence illuminate the nature of this neutralizing mechanism. They mimic and subvert the (...)
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  13.  5
    Adventure in times of terror.Anke Hennig - 2023 - Philosophy of Photography 14 (1):49-65.
    This article follows the history of the idea of adventure in the Soviet Union, which started as a dream of the great communist adventure but two decades into the revolution turned into the nightmare of the Great Terror. Adventure was implicated in the violent realities of Stalinism through tropes of the adventure genre, such as the loneliness of the adventurer in a precarious world impenetrable by reason. Understanding this situation requires a focus on philosophies of both adventure and terror. For (...)
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  14.  4
    Photography as violence: On experience and manipulation.Hilde Honerud & Jon Honerud - 2023 - Philosophy of Photography 14 (1):85-94.
    This publication presents a selection of photographic work by Hilde Honerud, made in collaboration with Yoga and Sports with Refugees (YSR) in Lesbos, Greece. It is introduced by a text coauthored with Jon Honerud. In order to engage with the experiences and the vulnerable position of the refugees involved, this project used increasingly apparent formal manipulations to convey an experience beyond the documentary image and to push observers to question the objectivity of images; to move from representation to immediate experience. (...)
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  15.  5
    How Photography Changed Philosophy, Daniel Rubinstein (2023).John Lechte - 2023 - Philosophy of Photography 14 (1):119-123.
    Review of: How Photography Changed Philosophy, Daniel Rubinstein (2023) New York and Abingdon: Routledge, 122 pp., ISBN 978-0-36769-422-7, h/bk, GBP 130.00.
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  16.  11
    The pencil of cheap nature: Towards an environmental history of photography.Boaz Levin - 2023 - Philosophy of Photography 14 (1):19-47.
    This article sets out to draft a preliminary sketch of an environmental history of photography, as opposed to a history of environmental photography. It shows that such a history should be rooted in a conceptualization of our geological epoch as the Capitalocene: the age of capital. Seen in this light, photography can be understood as part of a longer history of what the article describes – building on the work of activist and journalist Raj Patel and environmental historian Jason W. (...)
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  17.  5
    The portraits of disease.Chihying Musquiqui - 2023 - Philosophy of Photography 14 (1):109-118.
    ‘The portraits of disease’ explores the link between the symbolic use of diseases and the propagation of ideologies. It traces the origins of the term ‘Sick Man of Asia’ back to British newspapers in the mid-eighteenth century and its development into a metaphor for actual pathogens. The author contends that coloniality and pathogens share similarities, as both are highly transmissible and cannot be seen with the naked eye. The text also examines the influence of German-influenced microbiological research in the Japanese (...)
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  18.  5
    Lyotard and Critical Practice, Kiff Bamford and Margaret Grebowicz (eds) (2023).Mattia Paganelli - 2023 - Philosophy of Photography 14 (1):129-133.
    Review of: Lyotard and Critical Practice, Kiff Bamford and Margaret Grebowicz (eds) (2023) London: Bloomsbury, 238 pp., ISBN 978-1-35019-202-7, h/bk, GBP 85.00.
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  19.  6
    The choreography of violence: A discussion between Harri Pälviranta and Stefanie Baumann.Harri Pälviranta, Stefanie Baumann & Alexandra Athanasiadou - 2023 - Philosophy of Photography 14 (1):95-108.
    How is violence conventionally portrayed and where does violence lie in representation? How does photography mediate the relationships between different forms and ideas, moments and experiences of violence? These were some of the questions addressed in a conversation between artist Harri Pälviranta and philosopher Stefanie Baumann organized by Alexandra Athanasiadou, founder and director of the online platform Philosophy & Photography Lab (PHLSPH), during the international Photography Festival, Imago Lisboa, in Lisbon during October 2022. The discussion presented here is edited from (...)
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  20.  15
    The visual terms of state violence in Israel/Palestine: An interview with Rebecca L. Stein.Rebecca L. Stein, Noa Levin & Andrew Fisher - 2023 - Philosophy of Photography 14 (1):7-18.
    This interview with media anthropologist, Rebecca L. Stein, conducted by Noa Levin and Andrew Fisher in Spring 2023, takes her recent book Screenshots: State Violence on Camera in Israel and Palestine (2021) as its starting point in order to explore issues of state violence and the militarization of social media in Israel/Palestine. This book marks the culmination of a decade-long research project into the camera dreams introduced by digital imaging technologies and the fraught histories of their disillusionment. Stein discusses the (...)
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