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  1.  3
    Maternal Participant Experience in a South African Birth Cohort Study Enrolling Healthy Pregnant Women and Their Infants.Whitney Barnett, Kirsty Brittain, Katherine Sorsdahl, Heather J. Zar & Dan J. Stein - 2016 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 11 (1):3.
    BackgroundCritical to conducting high quality research is the ability to attract and retain participants, especially for longitudinal studies. Understanding participant experiences and motivators or barriers to participating in clinical research is crucial. There are limited data on healthy participant experiences in longitudinal research, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. This study aims to investigate quantitatively participant experiences in a South African birth cohort study.MethodsMaternal participant experience was evaluated by a self-administered survey in the Drakenstein Child Health Study, a longitudinal birth (...)
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  2.  1
    Acknowledgement of Manuscript Reviewers 2015.Kevin G. Donovan & James Giordano - 2016 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 11 (1):1.
    Contributing reviewersThe editors of Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine would like to thank all our reviewers who have contributed to the journal in Volume 10.
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  3.  6
    Establishing the First Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee in Egypt.Sohair R. Fahmy & Khadiga Gaafar - 2016 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 11 (1):1-6.
    BackgroundAlthough animal research ethics committees are well established in Western countries, this field is weakly developed and its concept is poorly understood in the Middle East and North Africa region.ObjectiveOur main objective was to introduce the concept and requirements of ethical approaches in dealing with experimental animal in research and teaching in Egypt.MethodsDue to its very recent inception, Cairo University, Faculty of Science IACUC decided to operate in accordance with Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals 8th Edition (...)
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  4.  2
    The Wizard Behind the Curtain: Programmers as Providers.Mark A. Graber & Olivia Bailey - 2016 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 11 (1):4.
    It is almost universally accepted that traditional provider-patient relationships should be governed, at least in part, by the ethical principles set forth by Beauchamp and Childress. These principles include autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence and justice. Recently, however, the nature of medial practice has changed. The pervasive presence of computer technology in medicine raises interesting ethical questions. In this paper we argue that some software designers should be considered health care providers and thus be subject the ethical principles incumbent upon “traditional” providers. (...)
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  5. A Four-Part Working Bibliography of Neuroethics: Part 3 – “Second Tradition Neuroethics” – Ethical Issues in Neuroscience.Amanda Martin, Kira Becker, Martina Darragh & James Giordano - 2016 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 11 (1):7.
    BackgroundNeuroethics describes several interdisciplinary topics exploring the application and implications of engaging neuroscience in societal contexts. To explore this topic, we present Part 3 of a four-part bibliography of neuroethics’ literature focusing on the “ethics of neuroscience.”MethodsTo complete a systematic survey of the neuroethics literature, 19 databases and 4 individual open-access journals were employed. Searches were conducted using the indexing language of the U.S. National Library of Medicine. A Python code was used to eliminate duplications in the final bibliography.ResultsThis bibliography (...)
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  6.  4
    Failed Surrogate Conceptions: Social and Ethical Aspects of Preconception Disruptions During Commercial Surrogacy in India.Sayani Mitra & Silke Schicktanz - 2016 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 11 (1):9.
    BackgroundDuring a commercial surrogacy arrangement, the event of embryo transfer can be seen as the formal starting point of the arrangement. However, it is common for surrogates to undergo a failed attempt at pregnancy conception or missed conception after an embryo transfer. This paper attempts to argue that such failed attempts can be understood as a loss. It aims to reconstruct the experiences of loss and grief of the surrogates and the intended parents as a consequence of their collective failure (...)
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  7.  1
    Informed Consent for the Diagnosis of Brain Death: A Conceptual Argument.Osamu Muramoto - 2016 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 11 (1):8.
    BackgroundThis essay provides an ethical and conceptual argument for the use of informed consent prior to the diagnosis of brain death. It is meant to enable the family to make critical end-of-life decisions, particularly withdrawal of life support system and organ donation, before brain death is diagnosed, as opposed to the current practice of making such decisions after the diagnosis of death. The recent tragic case of a 13-year-old brain-dead patient in California who was maintained on a ventilator for over (...)
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  8. Programs of Religious/Spiritual Support in Hospitals - Five “Whies” and Five “Hows”.Marcelo Saad & Roberta de Medeiros - 2016 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 11 (1):5.
    A contemporary orientation of the hospital experience model must encompass the clients’ religious-spiritual dimension. The objective of this paper is to share a previous experience, highlighting at least five reasons hospitals should invest in this direction, and an equal number of steps required to achieve it. In the first part, the text discourses about five reasons to invest in religious-spiritual support programs: 1. Religious-spiritual wellbeing is related to better health; 2. Religious-spiritual appreciation is a standard for hospital accreditation; 3. To (...)
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  9.  2
    Varsity Medical Ethics Debate 2015: Should Nootropic Drugs Be Available Under Prescription on the NHS?Emma Thorley, Isaac Kang, Stephanie D’Costa, Myrto Vlazaki, Olaoluwa Ayeko, Edward H. Arbe-Barnes & Casey B. Swerner - 2016 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 11 (1):6.
    The 2015 Varsity Medical Ethics debate convened upon the motion: “This house believes nootropic drugs should be available under prescription”. This annual debate between students from the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, now in its seventh year, provided the starting point for arguments on the subject. The present article brings together and extends many of the arguments put forward during the debate. We explore the current usage of nootropic drugs, their safety and whether it would be beneficial to individuals and (...)
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