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  1. Developing an Informational Tool for Ethical Engagement in Medical Tourism.Krystyna Adams, Jeremy Snyder, Valorie A. Crooks & Rory Johnston - 2017 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 12 (1):4.
    BackgroundMedical tourism, the practice of persons intentionally travelling across international boundaries to access medical care, has drawn increasing attention from researchers, particularly in relation to potential ethical concerns of this practice. Researchers have expressed concern for potential negative impacts to individual safety, public health within both countries of origin for medical tourists and destination countries, and global health equity. However, these ethical concerns are not discussed within the sources of information commonly provided to medical tourists, and as such, medical tourists (...)
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  2. A Four-Part Working Bibliography of Neuroethics: Part 4 - Ethical Issues in Clinical and Social Applications of Neuroscience.Becker Kira, R. Shook John, Darragh Martina & Giordano James - 2017 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 12 (1):1.
    BackgroundAs a discipline, neuroethics addresses a range of questions and issues generated by basic neuroscientific research, and its use and meanings in the clinical and social spheres. Here, we present Part 4 of a four-part bibliography of the neuroethics literature focusing on clinical and social applications of neuroscience, to include: the treatment-enhancement discourse; issues arising in neurology, psychiatry, and pain care; neuroethics education and training; neuroethics and the law; neuroethics and policy and political issues; international neuroethics; and discourses addressing "trans-" (...)
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  3. Erratum To: A Four-Part Working Bibliography of Neuroethics: Part 4 - Ethical Issues in Clinical and Social Applications of Neuroscience.Becker Kira, R. Shook John, Darragh Martina & Giordano James - 2017 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 12 (1):2.
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    Conceptualizing Suffering and Pain.Noelia Bueno-Gómez - 2017 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 12 (1):7.
    BackgroundThis article aims to contribute to a better conceptualization of pain and suffering by providing non-essential and non-naturalistic definitions of both phenomena. Contributions of classical evidence-based medicine, the humanistic turn in medicine, as well as the phenomenology and narrative theories of suffering and pain, together with certain conceptions of the person beyond them are critically discussed with such purpose.MethodsA philosophical methodology is used, based on the review of existent literature on the topic and the argumentation in favor of what are (...)
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    Do Health Professionals Have a Prototype Concept of Disease? The Answer is No.Bjørn Hofmann - 2017 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 12 (1):6.
    BackgroundHealth and disease are core concepts in health care and have attracted substantial interest and controversy. In recent and interesting contributions to the debate it has been argued that the challenges with the concept of disease can be resolved by a prototype concept of disease. As a robin is a more prototypical of a bird than a penguin, some diseases are more prototypical than others. If disease is a prototype concept, it would change nosology, but also health care and the (...)
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  6. Ethical, Legal and Societal Considerations on Zika Virus Epidemics Complications in Scaling-Up Prevention and Control Strategies.Ernest Tambo, Ghislaine Madjou, Christopher Khayeka-Wandabwa, Oluwasogo A. Olalubi, Chryseis F. Chengho & Emad I. M. Khater - 2017 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 12 (1):3.
    Much of the fear and uncertainty around Zika epidemics stem from potential association between Zika virus complications on infected pregnant women and risk of their babies being born with microcephaly and other neurological abnormalities. However, much remains unknown about its mode of transmission, diagnosis and long-term pathogenesis. Worries of these unknowns necessitate the need for effective and efficient psychosocial programs and medical-legal strategies to alleviate and mitigate ZIKV related burdens. In this light, local and global efforts in maintaining fundamental health (...)
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  7. Context and Scale: Distinctions for Improving Debates About Physician “Rationing”.Jon C. Tilburt & Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2017 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 12 (1):5.
    Important discussions about limiting care based on professional judgment often devolve into heated debates over the place of physicians in bedside rationing. Politics, loaded rhetoric, and ideological caricature from both sides of the rationing debate obscure precise points of disagreement and consensus, and hinder critical dialogue around the obligations and boundaries of professional practice. We propose a way forward by reframing the rationing conversation, distinguishing between the scale of the decision and its context avoiding the word “rationing.” We propose to (...)
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