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  1.  7
    Six Variations on Michael Rosen's The Shadow of God.Joshua L. Cherniss - 2023 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 35 (3):171-193.
    Michael Rosen’s The Shadow of God illustrates a distinctive way of understanding the relationship between ideas and history, while posing several connected questions. Among these are how the human condition of alienation may be overcome in a way that is ethically and intellectually defensible; how the search for reconciliation may generate, paradoxically, further alienation, and inspire terrible inhumanity; and whether a meaningful and good human life can be lived without the assurance of future justice—or, indeed, future existence. Rosen evokes the (...)
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  2.  10
    Living in the Shadows: Debating Meaning in a Post-Religious World.Michael E. Rosen - 2023 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 35 (3):247-280.
    The Shadow of God combines history and philosophy in a way that is, unlike Hegel, fundamentally pluralistic. It presents the period of German Idealism as a time when philosophers aimed to bring faith and reason together through the idea of autonomy. At the same time, the tensions endemic in that process led to a transfer of individual hope from an afterlife of reward or punishment to participation in a collective, historical process. This article responds to a series of critical questions: (...)
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  3.  12
    Who is Haunted by the Shadow of God? Dialectical Notes on Michael Rosen's Narrative of (Failed) Secularization.Rainer Forst - 2023 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 35 (3):194-202.
    In The Shadow of God, Michael Rosen argues that modern moral philosophy in the tradition of German Idealism is profoundly shaped by religious views these thinkers could not overcome. However, a closer look at Rosen’s critique of Kant’s and Kantian conceptions of morality raises the possibility that Rosen’s view may itself be haunted by the shadow of God. In particular, Rosen appears to believe that a moral imperative of respect for human dignity necessarily requires a religious-transcendent grounding, such that there (...)
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  4.  6
    Searching for the Arc of History: The Secularization of American Politics.Samuel Goldman - 2023 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 35 (3):203-218.
    Michael Rosen’s The Shadow of God includes an account of historical theodicy, which is the idea that the arc of history justifies the ways of God. Formulated by the German Idealists, its American expositors influenced the ideas of the nineteenth-century American theologian and activist Theodore Parker. As the orginator of the phrases “arc of history” and “government of the people, by the people, and for the people,” Parker’s influence extends to presidents and Supreme Court justices, demonstrating the long and influential (...)
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  5.  9
    Republicanizing Leviathan: Kant's Cosmopolitan Synthesis of Hobbes and Rousseau.Susan Meld Shell - 2023 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 35 (3):219-232.
    Kant’s thought from the 1750s onward can usefully be understood as a series of efforts to overcome the challenge posed in Machiavelli’s Prince: namely, to reconcile our idea of justice with what is actually possible given human nature as it is, rather than as reason tells us that it “should” be. Especially following his reading of Rousseau, this effort took the form of successive translations of the metaphysical concept of a world into the juridical language of world-citizenship, which transformed a (...)
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  6.  14
    Taking Freedom Seriously: Kantian Ethics versus the Ethics of Kant.Bernard Yack - 2023 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 35 (3):233-246.
    No understanding of morality has more zealous or influential defenders among academic philosophers than Kant’s. Yet as Michael Rosen demonstrates in The Shadow of God, there is a sense in which Kant’s critics take his conception of freedom more seriously nowadays than his defenders. As a result, contemporary versions of “Kantian ethics” often end up challenging what Rosen calls “the ethics of Kant,” not just the claims of rival moral theories. Rosen supports this surprising conclusion with some powerful arguments, showing (...)
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  7.  27
    Post-Trust, Not Post-Truth.Ward E. Jones - 2023 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 35 (1):63-93.
    The neologism post-truth is commonly used to characterize a polity in which false and biased beliefs have corrupted public opinion and policymaking. Simplifying and broadening our use of the adjective beyond its current narrow meaning could make post-truth a useful addition to the lexicons of history, politics, and philosophy. Its current use, however, is unhelpful and distracting (at best), and experienced as demeaning and humiliating (at worst). Contemporary polities are better characterized as post-trust. A polity becames post-trust when testimony from (...)
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  8.  75
    What Is a Conspiracy Theory and Why Does It Matter?Joseph E. Uscinski & Adam M. Enders - 2023 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 35 (1):148-169.
    Growing concern has been expressed that we have entered a “post-truth” era in which each of us willfully believes whatever we choose, aided and abetted by alternative and social media that spin alternative realities for boutique consumption. A prime example of the belief in alternative realities is said to be acceptance of “conspiracy theories”—a term that is often used as a pejorative to indict claims of conspiracy that are so obviously absurd that only the unhinged could believe them. The epistemological (...)
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  9.  19
    Post-Truth and the Epistemological Crisis.Jeffrey Friedman - 2023 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 35 (1):1-21.
    The polarization and charges of “post-truth” that mark contemporary politics may have its source, ultimately, in a crisis of epistemology, which is characterized by a tension between different forms of naïve realism—the view that reality appears to us directly, unmediated by interpretation. Perhaps too schematically, those on the right tend to be first-person naïve realists in treating economic and social realities as accessible to the ordinary political participant by simple common sense, while those on the left tend to be third-person (...)
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  10.  7
    Shaken Not Stirred: The Name of the Game in the Post-Truth Condition.Steve Fuller - 2023 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 35 (1):22-39.
    The post-truth condition is just as much about naming a meta-game as winning it. This condition can be tracked across Western intellectual history from the Homeric epics to popular culture. The common thread is that players are more likely to succeed in this meta-game if they have a certain consistency of character, which Thomas More called “integrity.” The presence of integrity means that the historical losers have often had an advantage in defining for subsequent generations the name of the game (...)
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  11. The Politics of Post-Truth.Michael Hannon - 2023 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 35 (1):40-62.
    A prevalent political narrative is that we are facing an epistemological crisis, where many citizens no longer care about truth and facts. Yet the view that we are living in a post-truth era relies on some implicit questionable empirical and normative assumptions. The post-truth rhetoric converts epistemic issues into motivational issues, treating people with whom we disagree as if they no longer believe in or care about truth. This narrative is also dubious on epistemic, moral, and political grounds. It is (...)
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  12.  21
    It’s Our Epistemic Environment, Not Our Attitude Toward Truth, That Matters.Neil Levy - 2023 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 35 (1):94-111.
    The widespread conviction that we are living in a post-truth era rests on two claims: that a large number of people believe things that are clearly false, and that their believing these things reflects a lack of respect for truth. In reality, however, fewer people believe clearly false things than surveys or social media suggest. In particular, relatively few people believe things that are widely held to be bizarre. Moreover, accepting false beliefs does not reflect a lack of respect for (...)
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  13.  17
    Post-Truth Politics and the Competition of Ideas.Alfred Moore - 2023 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 35 (1):112-121.
    ABSTRACT“Post-truth” politics is often framed as a failure of the competition of idea­s. Yet there are different ways of thinking about the competition of ideas, with different implications for the way we understand its benefits and risks. The dominant way of framing the competition of ideas is in terms of a marketplace, which, however, obscures the different ways ideas can compete. Several theorists can help us think through the competition of ideas. J. S. Mill, for example, avoided the metaphor of (...)
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  14.  13
    Post-Truth and the Rhetoric of “Following the Science”.Jacob Hale Russell & Dennis Patterson - 2023 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 35 (1):122-147.
    Populists are often cast as deniers of rationality, creators of a climate of “post-truth,” and valuing tribe over truth and the rigors of science. Their critics claim the authority of rationality and empirical facts. Yet the critics no less than populists enable an environment of spurious claims and defective argumentation. This is especially true in the realm of science. An important case study is the account of scientific trust offered by a leading public intellectual and historian of science, Naomi Oreskes, (...)
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