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  1.  8
    Knickknacks.Laura Guidry-Grimes - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (2):303-305.
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  2.  7
    When Harry Became Sally: Responding to the Transgender Moment by Ryan T Anderson: New York: Encounter Books, 2018.Armand H. Matheny Antommaria - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (1):195-199.
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  3.  7
    When Harry Became Sally: Responding to the Transgender Moment by Ryan T Anderson: New York: Encounter Books, 2018.Armand H. Matheny Antommaria - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (1):195-199.
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  4.  3
    Reading for Pandemic: Viral Modernism by Elizabeth Outka, New York: Columbia University Press, 2020.Rachel Conrad Bracken - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (1):109-114.
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  5.  1
    Inflorescence of Mistrust.Brent R. Carr - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (1):119-119.
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  6.  7
    The Poetics and Politics of Alzheimer’s Disease Life-Writing by Martina Zimmermann, London, UK: Palgrave McMillan, 2017.Kathryn Lafferty Danner - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (1):201-203.
  7.  1
    Virile Infertile Men, and Other Representations of In/Fertile Hegemonic Masculinity in Fiction Television Series.Marjolein Lotte de Boer - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (1):147-164.
    Fiction television series are one of the few cultural expressions in which men’s infertility experiences are represented. Through a content analysis of twenty fiction series, this article describes and analyzes such representations. By drawing on Connell’s concept of hegemonic masculinity and Ricoeur’s understanding of paradoxical power structuring, four character types of infertile men are identified: the virile in/fertile man, the secretly non-/vasectomized man, the intellectual eunuch, the enslaving post-apocalyptic man. While these various dramatis persona outline different ways of how infertile (...)
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  8. Letting Go of Familiar Narratives as Tragic Optimism in the Era of COVID-19.Anna Gotlib - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (1):81-101.
    The ongoing trauma of COVID-19 will no doubt mark entire generations in ways inherent in an unmanaged global pandemic. The question that I ask is why this ongoing trauma seems so particularly profound and so uniquely shattering, and whether there is anything that we could do now, while still in the midst of disaster, to begin the process of social and moral repair? I will begin by considering the trauma of isolation with unknown time-horizons, and argue that it not only (...)
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  9.  3
    Masks in Medicine: Metaphors and Morality.Lindsey Grubbs & Gail Geller - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (1):103-107.
    We have never been so aware of masks. They were in short supply in the early days of COVID-19, resulting in significant risk to health care workers. Now they are highly politicized with battles about mask-wearing protocols breaking out in public. Although masks have obtained a new urgency and ubiquity in the context of COVID-19, people have thought about both the literal and metaphorical role of masks in medicine for generations. In this paper, we discuss three such metaphors—the masks of (...)
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  10.  5
    The Ethic of Responsibility: Max Weber’s Verstehen and Shared Decision-Making in Patient-Centred Care.Ariane Hanemaayer - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (1):179-193.
    Whereas evidence-based medicine encourages the translation of medical research into decision-making through clinical practice guidelines, patient-centred care aims to integrate patient values through shared decision-making. In order to successfully integrate EBM and PCC, I propose a method of orienting physician decision-making to overcome the different obligations set out by a formally-rational EBM and substantively-rational ethics of care. I engage with Weber’s concepts “the ethic of responsibility” and verstehen as a new model of clinical reasoning that reformulates the relationship between medical (...)
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  11.  13
    Beside Oneself with Rage: The Doubled Self as Metaphor in a Narrative of Brain Injury with Emotional Dysregulation.Jorie Hofstra - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (1):131-146.
    People narrating the experience of dysregulated anger after a brain injury call upon metaphor in patterned ways to help them make sense of their situation. Here, I analyze the use of the metaphor of the doubled self in a personal narrative of brain injury, and I situate this metaphor in its cultural history by analyzing Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde and The Incredible Hulk as landmark moments in its development. A pattern of thought reflecting Seneca’s philosophy on the incompatibility of (...)
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  12.  5
    The COVID Pandemic: Selected Work.Therese Jones & Kathleen Pachucki - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (1):1-1.
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  13.  5
    “A Sick Child is Always the Mother’s Property”: The Jane Austen Pediatric Trauma Management Protocol.Perri Klass - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (1):121-129.
    Two pediatric accidents in Jane Austen’s Persuasion and one in Margaret Oliphant’s The Doctor’s Family are examined from the point of view of trauma management with analysis of contributing risk factors, medical management, concerns of parents and bystanders, and course of recovery. Risk factors for injury are impulsivity, poor supervision, and parents who are unable to set limits. Medical attention is swift and competent, but no heroic measures are used; the management of the injuries, concussion with loss of consciousness and (...)
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  14. Planetary Health Humanities—Responding to COVID Times.Bradley Lewis - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (1):3-16.
    The coronavirus pandemic has shattered our world with increased morbidity, mortality, and personal/social sufferings. At the time of this writing, we are in a biomedical race for protective equipment, viral testing, and vaccine creation in an effort to respond to COVID threats. But what is the role of health humanities in these viral times? This article works though interdisciplinary connections between health humanities, the planetary health movement, and environmental humanities to conceptualize the emergence of “planetary health humanities.” The goal of (...)
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  15.  8
    When Harry Became Sally: Responding to the Transgender Moment by Ryan T Anderson: New York: Encounter Books, 2018.Armand H. Matheny Antommaria - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (1):195-199.
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  16.  7
    COVID-19, Contagion, and Vaccine Optimism.Kelly McGuire - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (1):51-62.
    Steven Soderbergh’s Contagion positions the vaccine as the end point of the arc of ​pandemic, marking both the containment of an elusive virus and ​the resumption of a life not fundamentally different from ​before the disease outbreak. ​The film reinforces the ​assumption that a pandemic will awaken ​all of us to the urgency of vaccination​, persuading us to put aside our reservations and anxieties ​and the idea that compliance is the inevitable outcome of quarantine. This article explores how pro-vaccination cultural (...)
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  17.  4
    Movement as Method: Some Existential and Epistemological Reflections on Dance in the Health Humanities.Aimie Purser - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (1):165-178.
    The embodied creative practice of dance facilitates a particular kind of awareness or attunement which can inform both the therapeutic and the intellectual work of the Health Humanities. This paper therefore considers dance as a way of ‘doing’ Health Humanities in two interlinked ways: dance as a way of healing and dance as a way of knowing. In bringing together carnal and the creative dimensions of human experience, dance offers us a way of making sense of our place in the (...)
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  18.  4
    Love in the Time of COVID.Carl V. Tyler - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (1):117-117.
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  19.  3
    The Art of Death by Edwidge Dandicat, Minnesota: Graywolf Press, 2017.Belinda Waller-Peterson - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (1):205-207.
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  20.  6
    The Health Humanities and Camus’s the Plague, Edited by Woods Nash, Kent, OH: Kent State University Press, 2019.Steven Wilson - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (1):115-116.
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  21.  2
    Placing the Blame: What If “They” REALLY Are Responsible?Zhou Xun & Sander Gilman - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (1):17-49.
    The new coronavirus pandemic, COVID-19, has resurrected a number of historical and sociological problems associated with naming and blaming collectives for the origin or transmission of infectious disease. The default example of the false accusation in 2020 has been the case of the charge of well poisoning against the Jews of Western Europe causing the pandemic of the Black Death during the fourteenth century. Equally apparent is the wide-spread accusation that Asians are collectively responsible for the spread of the present (...)
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  22.  10
    Sinophobic Epidemics in America: Historical Discontinuity in Disease-Related Yellow Peril Imaginaries of the Past and Present.Dennis Zhang - 2021 - Journal of Medical Humanities 42 (1):63-80.
    Modern scholarship has drawn hasty and numerous parallels between the Yellow Peril discourses of the 19th- and 20th-century plagues and the recent racialization of infectious disease in the 21st-century. While highlighting these similarities is politically useful against Sinophobic epidemic narratives, Michel Foucault argues that truly understanding the past’s continuity in the present requires a more rigorous genealogical approach. Employing this premise in a comparative analysis, this work demonstrates a critical discontinuity in the epidemic imaginary that framed the Chinese as pathogenic. (...)
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