Year:

  1.  4
    Desegregation and the retreat of clinical psychoanalysis.Christopher Chamberlin - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (2):243-257.
    This article examines the racial politics that reshaped psychoanalytic psychotherapy and ushered in a community mental health paradigm during the U.S. Civil Rights Era. Policymakers in the 1960s adopted the language of social justice to condemn psychoanalysis for its inability to treat psychotics and its unwillingness to treat black patients; yet the community psychiatry model of treatment that replaced it compounded the denial of the black subject’s clinical needs. Challenging the extant historiography that appraises psychoanalysis as a victim of neoliberalism (...)
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  2.  7
    “May all Be Shattered into God”: Mary Barnes and Her Journey through Madness in Kingsley Hall.Adrian Chapman - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (2):207-228.
    Contributing to renewed scholarly interest in R. D. Laing and his circle, and in the radical therapeutic community of Kingsley Hall, London, this article offers the first article-length reading of Mary Barnes’ and Joseph Berke’s Mary Barnes: Two Accounts of a Journey through Madness. This text offers views of anti-psychiatry ‘on the ground’ that critique the 1960s utopianism of Laing’s championing of madness as a metanoic, quasi-psychedelic voyage. Barnes’ story, too, reveals tensions within the anti-psychiatric movement. Moving beyond existing criticism (...)
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  3.  6
    The Voices That Accompany Me.Arthur W. Frank - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (2):171-178.
    This essay begins with a metaphor describing who enters the field of humanities in medicine and healthcare and the types of work they do. The role of witness is discussed, underscoring tensions between witnessing and analyzing. The essay then turns to my own background as an example of how each professional in this field brings something distinct. I briefly describe the three basic principles of my work with narrative: the injunction to keep the stories in the foreground, the work of (...)
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  4.  8
    From Girlhood to Motherhood: Rituals of Childbirth and Obstetrical Medicine Re-Examined Through John Milton.Ashleigh Frayne - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (2):179-192.
    This article considers how seventeenth-century writer John Milton engages in modes of thinking that register the obstetric revolution occurring during the period. During a time when physicians were gaining entry to the birthing room, a medical rhetoric of childbirth was developing that cast childbirth in new pathological terms. Milton's A Masque Presented at Ludlow Castle demonstrates how childbirth was influenced by emerging obstetrical language and practice, as well as the ways in which a writer might question such influence. Finally, this (...)
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  5.  18
    Mono-Causal and Multi-Causal Theories of Disease: How to Think Virally and Socially About the Aetiology of AIDS.Katherine Furman - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (2):107-121.
    In this paper, I utilise the tools of analytic philosophy to amalgamate mono-causal and multi-causal theories of disease. My aim is to better integrate viral and socio-economic explanations of AIDS in particular, and to consider how the perceived divide between mono-causal and multi-causal theories played a role in the tragedy of AIDS denialism in South Africa in the early 2000s. Currently, there is conceptual ambiguity surrounding the relationship between mono-causal and multi-causal theories in biomedicine and epidemiology. Mono-causal theories focus on (...)
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  6.  10
    Nick in Time.Matthew Lee - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (2):261-261.
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  7.  2
    Suturing the Nation in South Korean Historical Television Medical Dramas.Kai Khiun Liew - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (2):193-205.
    Using the 2000-2010 South Korean historical medical dramas Heo Jun, Dae Jang Geum, and Jejoongwon as case studies, this article examines televisual reimaginations of Korean medical modernity as interpretative popular culture texts. Particularly in the areas of the anatomical sciences and surgery, modern medicine’s emancipatory potentials in these productions are set semi-fictitiously in pre-modern Joseon historical contexts. Dramaturgically challenging entrenched social hierarchies and ossified cultural taboos of Institutionalized Confucianism, these dramas’ progressive physician-protagonists emphasize the universality and impartiality of medical knowledge (...)
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  8. Suturing the Nation in South Korean Historical Television Medical Dramas.Kai Khiun Liew - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (2):193-205.
    Using the 2000-2010 South Korean historical medical dramas Heo Jun, Dae Jang Geum, and Jejoongwon as case studies, this article examines televisual reimaginations of Korean medical modernity as interpretative popular culture texts. Particularly in the areas of the anatomical sciences and surgery, modern medicine’s emancipatory potentials in these productions are set semi-fictitiously in pre-modern Joseon historical contexts. Dramaturgically challenging entrenched social hierarchies and ossified cultural taboos of Institutionalized Confucianism, these dramas’ progressive physician-protagonists emphasize the universality and impartiality of medical knowledge (...)
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  9. Suturing the Nation in South Korean Historical Television Medical Dramas.Kai Khiun Liew - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (2):193-205.
    Using the 2000-2010 South Korean historical medical dramas Heo Jun, Dae Jang Geum, and Jejoongwon as case studies, this article examines televisual reimaginations of Korean medical modernity as interpretative popular culture texts. Particularly in the areas of the anatomical sciences and surgery, modern medicine’s emancipatory potentials in these productions are set semi-fictitiously in pre-modern Joseon historical contexts. Dramaturgically challenging entrenched social hierarchies and ossified cultural taboos of Institutionalized Confucianism, these dramas’ progressive physician-protagonists emphasize the universality and impartiality of medical knowledge (...)
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  10.  14
    HIV Stigma, Gay Identity, and Caste ‘Untouchability’: Metaphors of Abjection in My Brother…Nikhil, The Boyfriend, and “Gandu Bagicha”.Shamira A. Meghani - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (2):137-151.
    In this article I read textual metaphors of ‘untouchability’ in ‘post-AIDS’ representation as an erasure of structures that condition HIV stigmatization in India. Throughout, my discussion is contextualised by the political economy of HIV and AIDS, which has been productive of particular modern sexual subjects. In the film My Brother…Nikhil, the stigmatization of Nikhil, a gay Indian man living with HIV, is constituted through visual and verbal caste metaphors, which draw on existing subject positions that are elided as ‘traditional’, residual, (...)
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  11. HIV and AIDS in Irish Theatre: Queer Masculinities, Punishment, and ‘Post-AIDS’ Culture.Cormac O’Brien - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (2):123-136.
    This essay provides a critical survey of key Irish theatre productions that present queer men with HIV or AIDS as a central theme while also seeking to situate several of these productions within the controversial discourse of ‘post-AIDS’ as it plays out in Irish cultural and social discourses. Through this survey, this essay finds and critically elaborates how a discourse of AIDS as punishment is a common denominator in all of these plays; whether that be as a central metaphor in (...)
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  12.  1
    Introduction: Framing ‘Post-AIDS’ and Global Health Discourses in 2015 and Beyond.Gráinne O’Connell - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (2):89-94.
    This special issue, entitled “Post-AIDS’ and Global Health Discourses: Interdisciplinary Perspectives,’ emerged from a one day Medical Humanities symposium at the Leeds Centre for Medical Humanities, at the University of Leeds, England, on February 27th 2015. This special issue focusses on the perceived deprioritising of HIV and AIDS in the Sustainable Development Goals, or SDGs, that were launched in 2015. The SDGs function as policy benchmarks for all entities within the United Nations system and they supersede the Millennium Development Goals, (...)
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  13.  4
    “The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar”: Undead Bodies and Medical Technology.Sarah O’Dell - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (2):229-242.
    This paper examines the relationship between medical technology and liminal states of “undeath” as presented in “The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar” and the real-life case of Jahi McMath, who was maintained on life support for over four years following a diagnosis of brain death. Through this juxtaposition, “Valdemar” comes to function as a modern fable, an uneasy herald of medical technology’s potential to create liminal states between life and death. The ability to transgress these boundaries bears a (...)
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  14.  1
    A Paper Man.Yusuf Patrick - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (2):259-260.
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  15.  1
    Temporal Dissonance: South African Historians and the ‘Post-AIDS’ Dilemma.Carla Tsampiras - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (2):153-169.
    While foregrounding the historiography of HIV and AIDS in the South African context, this article analyses AIDS as simultaneously existing in three spheres: first, virtually – as the subject matter of electronically measurable research; second, academically – as a topic of research in the discipline of History; and third, actually – as a complex health concern and signifier that, via the field of Medical and Health Humanities, could allow for new collaborations between historians and others interested in understanding AIDS. Throughout, (...)
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  16. Problematising the Discourse of ‘Post-AIDS’.Liz Walker - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (2):95-105.
    This paper reflects on the meanings of ‘post-AIDS’ in the Global North and South. I bring together contemporary arguments to suggest that the notion of ‘post-AIDS’ is, at best, misplaced, not least because its starting point remains a biotechnical one. Drawing on aspects of the sub-Saharan African experience, this essay suggests that, despite significant shifts in access to antiretroviral therapy, HIV continues to be fundamentally shaped by economic determinants and social and cultural practices. In this essay, I question the certainty (...)
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  17.  3
    Sundown for JC.James M. Wilkins - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (2):263-263.
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  18.  5
    Contemporary Artists’ Books and the Intimate Aesthetics of Illness.Stella Bolaki - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (1):21-39.
    This essay brings together critical perspectives from the discrete traditions of artists’ books and the medical humanities to examine artists’ books by three contemporary artists – Penny Alexander, Martha A. Hall and Amanda Watson-Will – that treat experiences of illness and wellbeing. Through its focus on a multimodal and multisensory art form that has allegiances with, but is not reduced to, narrative, the essay adds to recent calls to rethink key assumptions of illness narrative study and to challenge utilitarian approaches. (...)
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  19.  6
    Traces of the Invisible: How an Alternative Reading of The Sleeping Beauty Fashioned a Bookwork Heightening Awareness of the Role of the Anesthetist.Julie Brixey-Williams - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (1):41-51.
    This article discusses a Leverhulme residency undertaken by the author Julie Brixey-Williams in 2003–4 at the Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland. Notions of medical visibility were explored through practice-led investigations under the umbrella title, Traces of the Invisible, that concentrated on making concrete, visible responses to the hidden or intangible elements of the anesthetist’s working life in areas such as sleep, breath, pain and genetic markers. Rosebud is a unique nine-foot concertina bookwork created after reading the entire (...)
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  20.  5
    In the Absence of Running: From Injury and Medical Intervention to Art.Véronique Chance - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (1):65-80.
    In recent years, I have developed an endurance running art-practice as part of a larger inquiry into the performative nature of human physical activity. In the Absence of Running is series of artworks made using images from medical arthroscopic interventions following the diagnosis of medial meniscus tears to the cartilage and osteoarthritis in both my knees. Faced with not being able to run or to make artworks using running in the long-term, I turned to the tools of medical intervention. If (...)
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  21.  4
    On Photographing Artists’ Books.Egidija Čiricaitė - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (1):81-83.
    Artists’ books are challenging to photograph. They function as a unit of tightly conceptually-bound visual, textual and material elements in addition to a heightened self-awareness of the work's booksness. Binding, size, weight, and shape of the book, translucency, texture, thickness of paper, placement of images and/or text on the page or off the page interact with other graphic elements; they control, and direct the reader towards the expressive components of meaning which arise from pace, haptic experience, and visual or structural (...)
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  22.  3
    Reflections on Digestions and Other Corporealities in Artists’ Books.Amanda Couch - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (1):7-19.
    With an avid attention to the valuing of embodiment and a championing of the re-emergence of the body as site for discussions of knowledge and knowing, this essay shares aspects of my practice that engage a performative, haptic, situated engagement with the body through the artist’s book. The motivation for the creation of my bookworks was an interest in manifesting situated knowing and embodied ways of becoming. Engaging form, materiality, and bodily history, my artists’ books explore the processes and metaphors (...)
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  23.  4
    Bound to Speak: Accounts of Illness in Artists’ Books.Johanna Drucker - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (1):85-88.
    This paper addresses the role played by artists’ books in illness and recovery.
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  24.  5
    Unruly Voices: Artists’ Books and Humanities Archives in Health Professions Education.Jennifer S. Tuttle & Cathleen Miller - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (1):53-64.
    Martha A. Hall’s artists’ books documenting her experience of living with breast cancer offer future health professionals a unique opportunity to sit in the patient’s position of vulnerability and fear. Hall’s books have become a cornerstone of our medical humanities pedagogy at the Maine Women Writers Collection because of their emotional directness and their impact on readers. This essay examines the ways that Hall’s call for conversation with healthcare providers is enacted at the University of New England and provides a (...)
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