Year:

  1.  19
    The Major's Therapy: Ernest Hemingway's “In Another Country”. [REVIEW]George Monteiro - 1988 - Journal of Medical Humanities and Bioethics 9 (2):143-152.
    “In Another Country” draws upon Hemingway's experiences during World War I. Narrated by a wounded young American, this story is a parable of early machine-rehabilitation therapy, one in which the strong optimism of a physician employing new machines is contrasted with the skepticism of an Italian major (“the greatest fencer in Italy”) who, disbelieving in the machines, nevertheless comes regularly for therapy to his hand. That daily attendance is interrupted only when the major's young wife dies suddenly. The major, who (...)
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  2.  17
    Professional Liability (Malpractice) Coverage of Humanist Scholars Functioning as Clinical Medical Ethicists.Donnie J. Self & Joy D. Skeel - 1988 - Journal of Medical Humanities and Bioethics 9 (2):101-110.
    In contrast to theoretical discussions about potential professional liability of clinical ethicists, this report gives the results of empirical data gathered in a national survey of clinical medical ethicists. The report assesses the types of activities of clinical ethicists, the extent and types of their professional liability coverage, and the influence that concerns about legal liability has on how they function as clinical ethicists. In addition demographic data on age, sex, educational background, etc. are reported. The results show that while (...)
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  3.  16
    The Inclination of Modern Jurists to Associate Lawyers with Doctors: Plato's Response inGorgias 464–465. [REVIEW]Bruce Kimball - 1988 - Journal of Medical Humanities and Bioethics 9 (1):17-31.
    From the turn of the century, jurists have tended to associate lawyers with doctors as professionals and tried to ground this association in an analogy between law and medicine. Paradoxically, such comparisons suggest that American law and medicine are not analogous, while an analogy proposed by Plato illumines more fundamental respects in which law and medicine might be truly analogous.
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