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  1.  3
    Health, Well-Being, and Material-Ideal Hybrid Spaces in Yeats’s Writing.Tudor Balinisteanu - 2022 - Medical Humanities 48 (1):26-36.
    Traditionally regarded as high-art, poetry is often seen as a superior form of literary achievement consecrating in verse worldviews and lives connected to ideal, transcendental realms, the pursuance of which supposedly leads to some kind of ideal health and spiritual well-being. The poet WB Yeats, who believed in the power of poetry to reveal realities and states of such perfection, thereby giving purpose to mundane life, likened this effect of poetry to the fashioning of statues as monuments of unageing intellect. (...)
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  2.  1
    The Dying Patient: Taboo, Controversy and Missing Terms of Reference for Designers—an Architectural Perspective.Annie Bellamy, Sam Clark & Sally Anstey - 2022 - Medical Humanities 48 (1):e2-e9.
    Contemporary society has grown seemingly detached from the realities of growing old and subsequently, dying. A consequence, perhaps, of death becoming increasingly overmedicalised, nearly one in two UK nationals die institutional deaths. In this article we, two architectural scholars engaged in teaching, research and practice and a nurse and healthcare scholar with a focus on end-of-life care and peoples’ experiences, wish to draw attention to a controversy resulting from a paucity in current literature on the terms of reference of the (...)
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  3. Sexual Assault and Fatal Violence Against Women During the Irish War of Independence, 1919–1921: Kate Maher’s Murder in Context. [REVIEW]Ciara Breathnach & Eunan O'Halpin - 2022 - Medical Humanities 48 (1):94-103.
    At the height of the Irish War of Independence, 1919–1921, 45-year-old Kate Maher was brutally raped. She subsequently died of terrible wounds, almost certainly inflicted by drunken British soldiers. This article discusses her inadequately investigated case in the wider context of fatal violence against women and girls during years of major political instability. Ordinarily her violent death would have been subject to a coroner’s court inquiry and rigorous police investigation, but in 1920, civil inquests in much of Ireland were replaced (...)
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  4.  9
    Talking It Better: Conversations and Normative Complexity in Healthcare Improvement.Alan Cribb, Vikki Entwistle & Polly Mitchell - 2022 - Medical Humanities 48 (1):85-93.
    In this paper, we consider the role of conversations in contributing to healthcare quality improvement. More specifically, we suggest that conversations can be important in responding to what we call ‘normative complexity’. As well as reflecting on the value of conversations, the aim is to introduce the dimension of normative complexity as something that requires theoretical and practical attention alongside the more recognised challenges of complex systems, which we label, for short, as ‘explanatory complexity’. In brief, normative complexity relates to (...)
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  5.  5
    Teaching with Madness/‘Mental Illness’ Autobiographies in Postsecondary Education: Ethical and Epistemological Implications.Alise de Bie - 2022 - Medical Humanities 48 (1):37-50.
    This paper presents a critical interpretive synthesis of 53 articles describing the pedagogical use of madness/‘mental illness’ autobiographical narratives in postsecondary education. Focusing on instructor intentions and representations of student learning outcomes, findings indicate that narratives are most commonly used as ‘learning material’ to engage students in active learning, cultivate students’ empathy, complement dominant academic/professional knowledges, illustrate abstract concepts and provide ‘real’-life connections to course content. This paper contributes to a conversation across the intellectual traditions of Mad studies, medical humanities, (...)
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  6.  3
    Health Awareness as Genre: The Exigence of Preparedness in Cancer Awareness Campaigns and Critical-Illness Insurance Marketing.Loren Gaudet - 2022 - Medical Humanities 48 (1):9-16.
    Dominant understandings of genre-as-form have limited our abilities to perceive health awareness: we recognise, and expect, health awareness campaigns from governmental and non-profit agencies. Inversely, we often fail to recognise, or name, health awareness as such when it comes from other sources, such as commercial marketing or advertisements for products. However, rhetorical genre theory centres attention on action brought about by form and, as such, rhetorical genre provides tools for recognising instances of health awareness often escape our notice. One such (...)
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  7. How Care Holds Humanity: The Myth of Cura and Theories of Care.Halvor Hanisch - 2022 - Medical Humanities 48 (1):e1-e9.
    Modern medicine has often struggled to grasp the cultural aspects of interpersonal care. The medical humanities, on the other hand, have struggled to grasp the embodied, intimate character of care. In a recent appeal to the medical humanities, Julia Kristeva et al argue that care can be a point of crossing between these two ‘ontological domains’. They evoke the myth of Cura, referring to previous utilisations by such diverse thinkers as Heidegger and Kleinman, as well as Kristeva’s previous work. This (...)
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  8. Pine Fresh: The Cultural and Medical Context of Pine Scent in Relation to Health—From the Forest to the Home.Clare Hickman - 2022 - Medical Humanities 48 (1):104-113.
    Pine is a familiar scent in domestic cleaning products, but how often do we relate it to its origins as an odour emanating from a tree? This article takes a sensory history approach to trace the late 19th century and early 20th century use of the pine forest as a therapeutic space, via the tuberculosis sanatoria to the use of pine scent in domestic disinfectant. By focusing on pine as experienced in this period as a microhistorical subject, this methodology will (...)
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  9.  4
    From Blocked Flows to Suppressed Emotions: The Life of a Trope.Stewart Justman - 2022 - Medical Humanities 48 (1):17-25.
    Internal blockages and build-ups cause disease: traditionally, this principle seemed intuitive both to professionals and the laity, explained conditions as diverse as melancholy and scurvy, and justified the use of evacuative treatments to get rid of noxious matter. With the collapse of humoral medicine and the establishment of the concept of specific causation, one might have expected time-honoured tropes of obstruction to die off. They did not die off, but moved with the times and adapted to new conditions. Emphasis swung (...)
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  10.  10
    ‘The Body Says It’: The Difficulty of Measuring and Communicating Sensations of Breathlessness.Alice Malpass, Coreen Mcguire & Jane Macnaughton - 2022 - Medical Humanities 48 (1):63-75.
    Breathlessness is a sensation affecting those living with chronic respiratory disease, obesity, heart disease and anxiety disorders. The Multidimensional Dyspnoea Profile is a respiratory questionnaire which attempts to measure the incommunicable different sensory qualities of breathlessness. Drawing on sensorial anthropology we take as our object of study the process of turning sensations into symptoms. We consider how shared cultural templates of ‘what counts as a symptom’ evolve, mediate and feed into the process of bodily sensations becoming a symptom. Our contribution (...)
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  11.  14
    Theorising the Neurotypical Gaze: Autistic Love and Relationships in The Bridge.Catherine McDermott - 2022 - Medical Humanities 48 (1):51-62.
    In popular media, autistic subjectivity is most often produced through the lens of the neurotypical gaze. Dominant understandings of autism therefore tend to focus on perceived deficits in social communication and relationships. Accordingly, this article has two primary concerns. First, it uses the Danish/Swedish television series The Bridge and critical responses to the series as examples of how the neurotypical gaze operates, concentrating on the pleasures derived from looking at autism, how autism is ‘fixed’ as a socially undesirable subject position, (...)
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  12. Food Hygiene, Public Health Education and Citizenship in Britain, 1948–1967.Alex Mold - 2022 - Medical Humanities 48 (1):114-122.
    This article examines food hygiene campaigns in Britain between 1948 and 1967, using these as a way to explore the making of health citizenship and the relationship between state and citizen. The projection of hygienic citizenship amalgamated old concerns around morality, modernity and cleanliness, as well as new issues surrounding the changing position of women, the home and the rise of consumerism. Other ways of thinking about citizenship, such as social citizenship and consumer citizenship, were incorporated within food hygiene campaigns. (...)
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  13. Editor’s Note.Brandy Schillace - 2022 - Medical Humanities 48 (1):1-1.
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  14.  6
    The Mediated Discourse and Voice of Euthanasia: The Israeli Media as a Case Study.Baruch Shomron - 2022 - Medical Humanities 48 (1):76-84.
    Euthanasia is an important social and quality of life issue. However, it is highly controversial and thus continuously debated especially given its legitimacy and legality differ between countries. Little is known about the role media plays concerning this topic. To fill this gap, this study applies a mixed methods approach to a case study of Israeli media, including a quantitative content analysis of news articles, a thematic analysis of news articles and a quantitative content analysis of Facebook comments. Results indicate (...)
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  15. A Legacy of Silence: The Intersections of Medical Sociology and Disability Studies.Gareth Martin Thomas - 2022 - Medical Humanities 48 (1):123-132.
    Disability remains on the margins of the social sciences. Even where disability is foregrounded as a category of analysis, accounts regularly emerge in silos, with little interdisciplinary dialogue acknowledging the potential intersections and points of convergence. This discord is particularly acute within medical sociology and disability studies, yet there is mostly a legacy of silence about the relationship between the two disciplines. Drawing upon data from a qualitative study with parents of disabled children in the UK, I show the value (...)
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  16. Disability, Relationship, and the Negotiation of Loss.Brian Watermeyer & Victor Mckinney - 2022 - Medical Humanities 48 (1):2-8.
    Oppressive stereotypes of invalidity and tragedy have positioned loss and grieving as contested issues in the field of disability studies. Ascriptions of ‘denial’ are rejected by many disabled people, as a reductive medicalisation of their lived reality. For these and other reasons, this paper asserts that disabled people are afforded limited or awkward social spaces for grief, be it to do with social positioning, embodiment, or any other aspect of human experience. This is significant because grieving may have an important (...)
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