Year:

  1.  18
    Ethics in Cross-Cultural Encounters: A Medical Concern?Arild Kjell Aambø - 2020 - Medical Humanities 46 (1):22-30.
    Modern medicine’s investment in the disembodied, objective ‘science’ of biomedicine, where patients are transformed from suffering subjects to objects of investigation, calls for heightened ethical awareness. Around the world, ethical codes of conduct emphasise beneficence and non-maleficence. Lately, we have also seen a quest for autonomy and equitable healthcare for diverse populations. However, these tenets alone do not effectively address the problems which regularly occur in transcultural consultations. By developing a ’space for reflection' based on selected writings of the moral (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  6
    Graphic Illustration of Impairment: Science Fiction, Transmetropolitan and the Social Model of Disability.Richard Gibson - 2020 - Medical Humanities 46 (1):12-21.
    The following paper examines the cyberpunk transhumanist graphic novel Transmetropolitan through the theoretical lens of disability studies to demonstrate how science fiction, and in particular this series, illustrate and can influence how we think about disability, impairment and difference. While Transmetropolitan is most often read as a scathing political and social satire about abuse of power and the danger of political apathy, the comic series also provides readers with representations of impairment and the source of disability as understood by the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  3
    Prosthesis and the Engineered Imagination: Reading Augmentation and Disability Across Cultural Theory, Representation and Product Design.Raymond Holt & Stuart Murray - 2020 - Medical Humanities 46 (1):55-61.
    This article argues for the value of considering the interaction of literary/cultural studies, disability studies and engineering/design studies in the ongoing development of a critical medical humanities research frame. With a specific focus on prosthesis, but also considerations of embodiment, technology and augmentation as concepts in both cultural/disability theory and engineering/design, we note how the shifting and plastic ideas of ‘the prosthetic’ as used within cultural studies have never been in conversation with scholars who work on prostheses in engineering design (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  14
    Corporate Medical Cultures: MD Anderson as a Case Study in American Corporate Medical Values.John Mulligan & Bilal Rehman - 2020 - Medical Humanities 46 (1):84-92.
    This paper contributes to the evolving body of literature diagnosing the ‘business-like’ transformation of American medicine by historicising and recuperating the concepts of medical leadership and the corporation. In an analysis of the evolving uses of ‘leadership’ in medical literature, we argue that the term’s appeal derives from its ability to productively articulate the inevitable conflicts that arise between competing values in corporations, and so should be understood as a response to the neoliberal corporation’s false resolutions of conflict according to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  4
    How Sociophenomenology of the Body Problematises the ‘Problem-Oriented Approach’ to Growth Hormone Treatment.Maria Cristina Murano, Jenny Slatman & Kristin Zeiler - 2020 - Medical Humanities 46 (1):2-11.
    This article examines how people who are shorter than average make sense of their lived experience of embodiment. It offers a sociophenomenological analysis of 10 semistructured interviews conducted in the Netherlands, focusing on if, how, and why height matters to them. It draws theoretically on phenomenological discussions of lived and objective space, intercorporeality and norms about bodies. The analysis shows that height as a lived phenomenon is active engagement in space, coshapes habituated ways of behaving and is shaped by gendered (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  16
    We Need to Talk About Epizelus: ‘PTSD’ and the Ancient World.Owen Rees - 2020 - Medical Humanities 46 (1):46-54.
    In the pursuit to offer validity and lineage to the modern diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder, non-historical scholars often remove ancient episodes from their social context and retrospectively diagnose them based on our modern diagnostic criteria. This approach reinforces our pre-existing ideas, and form a confirmation bias that does not help to grow our understanding of these injuries. As this article argues, the use of ancient precedents would offer greater benefit to the psychological and medical profession when used to ask (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  1
    March Editorial.Brandy Schillace - 2020 - Medical Humanities 46 (1):1-1.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  5
    Estranged Relations: Coercion and Care in Narratives of Supported Decision-Making in Mental Healthcare.Meredith Stone, Renata Kokanovic, Felicity Callard & Alex F. Broom - 2020 - Medical Humanities 46 (1):62-72.
    Supported decision-making has become popular among policymakers and mental health advocates as a means of reducing coercion in mental healthcare. Nevertheless, users of psychiatric services often seem equivocal about the value of supported decision-making initiatives. In this paper we explore why such initiatives might be rejected or ignored by the would-be beneficiaries, and we reflect on broader implications for care and coercion. We take a critical medical humanities approach, particularly through the lens of entanglement. We analyse the narratives of 29 (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  2
    Health at the Writing Desk of John Ruskin: A Study of Handwriting and Illness.Deborah E. Thorpe, Jane E. Alty & Peter A. Kempster - 2020 - Medical Humanities 46 (1):31-45.
    Though John Ruskin is remembered principally for his work as a theorist, art critic and historian of visual culture, he wrote exhaustively about his health in his correspondence and diaries. Ruskin was prone to recurring depressive and hypochondriacal feelings in his youth and adulthood. In 1871, at the age of 52 years, he developed an illness with relapsing psychiatric and neurological features. He had a series of attacks of brain disturbance, and a deterioration of his mental faculties affected his writing (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Beyond Messiaen’s Birds: The Post-Verbal World of Dementia.Stuart Wood - 2020 - Medical Humanities 46 (1):73-83.
    This paper investigates the use of verbatim musical transcription as a research method in dementia care. It reports on an art-based ethnographic study ) in which verbatim transcription was applied to everyday interactions in dementia care, making use of musical—instead of verbal—notation. Starting from the notion that medical and healthcare settings can be sites of ‘found performance’, the paper reviews literature relating to artistic methodologies within medical humanities, music, ethnography and dementia care. From this review, it proposes a research design (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues