103 found

Year:

  1.  15
    Operationalization of Patients’ Rights in Sudan: Quantifying Nurses’ Knowledge.Salma M. Abdalla, Esra A. A. Mahgoub, Jihad Abdelgadir, Nahla Elhassan & Zulfa Omer - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (7-8):2239-2246.
    Background: Promoting patients’ rights is essential for defining the standards of clinical services within a country. Given their responsibilities, nurses can be the primary target for research to investigate the issue of patients’ rights within a healthcare system. As such, assessing the knowledge of nurses about patients’ rights is an essential step toward improving the quality of healthcare in limited resource settings like Sudan. Objectives: We aimed to assess the level of knowledge about patients’ rights among the nursing staff at (...)
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  2.  3
    Surgical Nurses’ Knowledge and Practices About Informed Consent.Elif Akyüz, Hülya Bulut & Mevlüde Karadağ - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (7-8):2172-2184.
    Background: Informed consent involves patients being informed, in detail, of information relating to diagnosis, treatment, care and prognosis that relates to him or her. It also involves the patient explicitly demonstrating an understanding of the information and a decision to accept or decline the intervention. Nurses in particular experience problems regarding informed consent. Research question and design: This descriptive study was designed to determine nurse knowledge and practices regarding their roles and responsibilities for informed consent in Turkey. The research was (...)
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  3.  11
    Evaluating Ethical Sensitivity in Surgical Intensive Care Nurses.Zehra Basar & Dilek Cilingir - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (7-8):2384-2397.
    Background and aim: Surgical intensive care nurses should have ethical sensitivity allowing them to identify ethical issues in order that they can recognize them and make the right decisions. This descriptive study was conducted with the aim of evaluating the ethical sensitivity of surgical intensive care nurses. Materials and methods: The research was carried out with the participation of 160 nurses in six Turkish hospitals, four state, one university, and one private. The data were collected using the “Nurse Description Form” (...)
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  4.  3
    Value Conflicts in Perioperative Practice.Ann-Catrin Blomberg, Birgitta Bisholt & Lillemor Lindwall - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (7-8):2213-2224.
    Background: The foundation of all nursing practice is respect for human rights, ethical value and human dignity. In perioperative practice, challenging situations appear quickly and operating theatre nurses must be able to make different ethical judgements. Sometimes they must choose against their own professional principles, and this creates ethical conflicts in themselves. Objectives: This study describes operating theatre nurses’ experiences of ethical value conflicts in perioperative practice. Research design: Qualitative design, narratives from 15 operating theatre nurses and hermeneutic text interpretation. (...)
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  5.  12
    Advance Care Planning for Older People: The Influence of Ethnicity, Religiosity, Spirituality and Health Literacy.Kay de Vries, Elizabeth Banister, Karen Harrison Dening & Bertha Ochieng - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (7-8):1946-1954.
    In this discussion paper we consider the influence of ethnicity, religiosity, spirituality and health literacy on Advance Care Planning for older people. Older people from cultural and ethnic minorities have low access to palliative or end-of-life care and there is poor uptake of advance care planning by this group across a number of countries where advance care planning is promoted. For many, religiosity, spirituality and health literacy are significant factors that influence how they make end-of-life decisions. Health literacy issues have (...)
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  6.  10
    Neonatal Nurse Practitioner Ethics Knowledge and Attitudes.Mobolaji Famuyide, Caroline Compretta & Melanie Ellis - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (7-8):2247-2258.
    Background: Neonatal nurse practitioners have become the frontline staff exposed to a myriad of ethical issues that arise in the day-to-day environment of the neonatal intensive care unit. However, ethics competency at the time of graduation and after years of practice has not been described. Research aim: To examine the ethics knowledge base of neonatal nurse practitioners as this knowledge relates to decision making in the neonatal intensive care unit and to determine whether this knowledge is reflected in attitudes toward (...)
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  7.  11
    The Development of a Clinical Policy Ethics Assessment Tool.Diego José Garcia-Capilla, Alfonso Rubio-Navarro, Maria José Torralba-Madrid & Jane Rutty - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (7-8):2259-2277.
    Introduction: Clinical policies control several aspects of clinical practice, including individual treatment and care, resource management and healthcare professionals’ etiquette. This article presents Clinical Policy Ethics Assessment Tool, an ethical assessment tool for clinical policies that could be used not only by clinical ethics committees but also by policy committees or other relevant groups. Aim: The aim of this study was to find or create a tool to identify ethical issues and/or confirm ethical validity in nursing practice policies, protocols and (...)
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  8.  6
    Concept Synthesis of Dignity in Care for Elderly Facility Residents.Nanako Hasegawa & Katsumasa Ota - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (7-8):2016-2034.
    Background: Protecting the dignity of elderly residents of facilities and providing dignified care can be difficult. Although attempts have been made from several aspects, dignity is considered an area in which less real impact has been made in both theory and practice. Objective: The objective of this study is to characterize the concept of dignity in care for elderly subjects in residential facilities from a practical perspective through concept synthesis. Research design: This study includes in-depth interviews with residents of elderly (...)
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  9.  5
    Is Privacy a Problem During Bedside Handovers? A Practice-Oriented Discussion Paper.Simon Malfait, Ann Van Hecke, Wim Van Biesen & Kristof Eeckloo - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (7-8):2288-2297.
    Bedside handover is the delivery of the nurse-to-nurse handover at the patient’s bedside. Although increasingly used in nursing, nurses report many barriers for delivering the bedside handover. Among these barriers is the possibility of breaching the patient’s privacy. By referring to this concept, nurses add a legal and ethical dimension to the delivery of the bedside handover, making implementation of the method difficult or even impossible. In this discussion article, the concept of privacy during handovers is being discussed by use (...)
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  10.  6
    Comparison of Thai Older Patients’ Wishes and Nurses’ Perceptions Regarding End-of-Life Care.Manchumad Manjavong, Varalak Srinonprasert, Panita Limpawattana, Jarin Chindaprasirt, Srivieng Pairojkul, Thunchanok Kuichanuan, Sawadee Kaiyakit, Thitikorn Juntararuangtong, Kongpob Yongrattanakit, Jiraporn Pimporm & Jinda Thongkoo - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (7-8):2006-2015.
    Background: Achieving a “good death” is a major goal of palliative care. Nurses play a key role in the end-of-life care of older patients. Understanding the perceptions of both older patients and nurses in this area could help improve care during this period. Objectives: To examine and compare the preferences and perceptions of older patients and nurses with regard to what they feel constitutes a “good death.” Research design: A cross-sectional study. Participants and research context: This study employed a self-report (...)
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  11.  7
    Nursing Students’ Ethical Challenges in the Clinical Settings: A Mixed-Methods Study.Roghayeh Mehdipour Rabori, Mahlagha Dehghan & Monirosadat Nematollahi - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (7-8):1983-1991.
    Background: Nursing students experience ethical conflicts and challenges during their clinical education. These may lead to moral distress and disturb the learning process. Objectives: This study aimed to explore and to evaluate the nursing students’ ethical challenges in the clinical settings in Iran. Research design: This was a mixed-methods study with an exploratory sequential design. Participants and research context: A total of 37 and 120 Iranian nursing students participated in the qualitative and quantitative phases, respectively. Ethical considerations: The ethical committee (...)
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  12.  9
    Caregivers’ Perception of Dignity in Teenagers with Autism Spectrum Disorder.Fatemeh Mohammadi, Mahnaz Rakhshan, Zahra Molazem, Najaf Zareh & Mark Gillespie - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (7-8):2035-2046.
    Introduction: Maintaining dignity is one of patients is one of the main ethical responsibilities of caregivers. However, in many cases, the dignity of patients, especially autistic teenagers is not maintained. The extent to which dignity needs are met for this group within the Iranian care system is difficult to determine as dignity is an abstract concept, and there are few related research studies reported. Objectives: The objective of this study is to find out caregivers perspectives on dignity in teenagers with (...)
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  13.  4
    Development and Validation of Nurses’ Moral Courage Scale.Olivia Numminen, Jouko Katajisto & Helena Leino-Kilpi - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (7-8):2438-2455.
    Background: Moral courage is required at all levels of nursing. However, there is a need for development of instruments to measure nurses’ moral courage. Objectives: The objective of this study is to develop a scale to measure nurses’ self-assessed moral courage, to evaluate the scale’s psychometric properties, and to briefly describe the current level of nurses’ self-assessed moral courage and associated socio-demographic factors. Research design: In this methodological study, non-experimental, cross-sectional exploratory design was applied. The data were collected using Nurses’ (...)
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  14.  12
    Negative Prompts Aimed at Maintaining Eating Independence.Alvisa Palese, Silvia Gonella, Tea Kasa, Davide Caruzzo, Mark Hayter & Roger Watson - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (7-8):2158-2171.
    Background:Psychological abuse of older people is difficult to recognise; specifically, nursing home residents have been documented to be at higher risk of psychological abuse during daily care, such as during feeding. Healthcare professionals adopt positive and negative verbal prompts to maintain residents’ eating independence; however, negative prompts’ purposes and implications have never been discussed to date.Research aims:To critically analyse negative verbal prompts given during mealtimes as forms of abuse of older individuals and violation of ethical principles.Research design:This is a secondary (...)
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  15.  4
    Intelligent Machines, Care Work and the Nature of Practical Reasoning.Angus Robson - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (7-8):1906-1916.
    Background: The debate over the ethical implications of care robots has raised a range of concerns, including the possibility that such technologies could disrupt caregiving as a core human moral activity. At the same time, academics in information ethics have argued that we should extend our ideas of moral agency and rights to include intelligent machines. Research objectives: This article explores issues of the moral status and limitations of machines in the context of care. Design: A conceptual argument is developed, (...)
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  16.  9
    Moral Distress in Healthcare Assistants: A Discussion with Recommendations.Daniel Rodger, Bruce Blackshaw & Amanda Young - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (7-8):2306-2313.
    Background: Moral distress can be broadly described as the psychological distress that can develop in response to a morally challenging event. In the context of healthcare, its effects are well documented in the nursing profession, but there is a paucity of research exploring its relevance to healthcare assistants. Objective: This article aims to examine the existing research on moral distress in healthcare assistants, identity the important factors that are likely to contribute to moral distress, and propose preventative measures. Research Design: (...)
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  17.  10
    Multi-Dimensional Approach to End-of-Life Care: The Welfare Model.Shin Wei Sim, Tze Ling Gwendoline Beatrice Soh & Lalit Kumar Radha Krishna - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (7-8):1955-1967.
    Appropriate and balanced decision-making is sentinel to goal setting and the provision of appropriate clinical care that are attuned to preserving the best interests of the patient. Current family-led decision-making in family-centric societies such as those in Singapore and other countries in East Asia are believed to compromise these objectives in favor of protecting familial interests. Redressing these skewed clinical practices employing autonomy-based patient-centric approaches however have been found wanting in their failure to contend with wider sociocultural considerations that impact (...)
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  18.  9
    Structural Justice and Nursing: Inpatient Nurses’ Obligation to Address Social Justice Needs of Patients.Pageen M. Small - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (7-8):1928-1935.
    As inpatient nurses spend the majority of their work time caring for patients at the bedside, they are often firsthand witnesses to the devastating outcomes of inadequate preventive healthcare and structural injustices within current social systems. This experience should obligate inpatient nurses to be involved in meeting the social justice needs of their patients. Many nursing codes of ethics mandate some degree of involvement in the social justice needs of society, though how this is to be achieved is not detailed (...)
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  19.  5
    Radical Actions to Address UK Organ Shortage, Enacting Iran’s Paid Donation Programme: A Discussion Paper.Rebecca Timmins & Magi Sque - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (7-8):1936-1945.
    Globally there is a shortage of organs available for transplant resulting in thousands of lives lost as a result. Recently in the United Kingdom 457 people died as a result of organ shortage in just 1 year. 1 NHS Blood and Transplant suggest national debates to test public attitudes to radical actions to increase organ donation should be considered in addressing organ shortage. The selling of organs for transplant in the United Kingdom is prohibited under the Human Tissue Act 2004. (...)
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  20.  12
    The Relationship Amongst Ethical Position, Religiosity and Self-Identified Culture in Student Nurses.Jane H. White, Anne Griswold Peirce & William Jacobowitz - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (7-8):2398-2412.
    Background/purpose: Research from other disciplines demonstrates that ethical position, idealism, or relativism predicts ethical decision-making. Individuals from diverse cultures ascribe to various religious beliefs and studies have found that religiosity and culture affect ethical decision-making. Moreover, little literature exists regarding undergraduate nursing students’ ethical position; no studies have been conducted in the United States on students’ ethical position, their self-identified culture, and intrinsic religiosity despite an increase in the diversity of nursing students across the United States. Participants and Research Context (...)
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  21.  5
    Moral Distress and Burnout in Iranian Nurses: The Mediating Effect of Workplace Bullying.Fardin Ajoudani, Rahim Baghaei & Mojgan Lotfi - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (6):1834-1847.
    Background: Moral distress and workplace bullying are important issues in the nursing workplace that appear to affect nurse’s burnout. Aim: To investigate the relationship between moral distress and burnout in Iranian nurses, as mediated by their perceptions of workplace bullying. Ethical considerations: The research was approved by the committee of ethics in research of the Urmia University of Medical Sciences. Method: This is a correlation study using a cross-sectional design with anonymous questionnaires as study instruments. Data were collected from 278 (...)
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  22.  12
    Cancer Nurses’ Perceptions of Ethical Climate in Greece and Cyprus.Cloconi Constantina, Evridiki Papastavrou & Andreas Charalambous - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (6):1805-1821.
    Background: In recent years, the interest in ethical climate has increased in the literature. However, there is limited understanding of the phenomenon within the cancer care context as well as between countries. Aim: To evaluate cancer nurses’ perceptions of hospital ethical climate in Greece and Cyprus. Research design: This was a quantitative descriptive–correlational comparative study with cancer nurses. Data were collected with the Greek version of the Hospital Ethical Climate Survey questionnaire in addition to demographic data. Participants and research context: (...)
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  23.  10
    Ethical Values of Academic Nurses: A Pilot Study.Yıldız Denat, Yurdanur Dikmen & Gülşah Gürol Arslan - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (6):1744-1752.
    Background: While academics contribute to the development of society through all the subjects that they work on, they also have other important tasks to fulfill, such as being role models for their students and society. Therefore, the place of academic ethical values is a significant topic for academic nurses. Objective: The main objective of this research was to examine the attitudes of academic nurses toward academic ethics. Research design: This descriptive and cross-sectional research study was conducted between March and June (...)
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  24.  8
    Advance Care Planning for Frail Older People in China: A Discussion Paper.Ren-Li Deng, Jia-Zhong Duan, Jiang-Hui Zhang, Jia-Rui Miao, Liu-Liu Chen & Diana T. F. Lee - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (6):1696-1706.
    As the aging population, including frail older people, continues to grow in Mainland China, quality of life and end-of-life care for frail older people has attracted much attention. Advance care planning is an effective way to improve end-of-life care for people with advanced diseases, and it is widely used in developed countries; however, it is a new concept in Mainland China. The effects of advance care planning and its acceptability in Mainland China are uncertain because of its culture-sensitive characteristics. The (...)
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  25.  5
    Reflections on 2019 Conference and Announcing a Special Issue.Ann Gallagher & Michael Dunn - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (6):1583-1584.
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  26.  5
    Perceptions of Slow Codes by Nurses Working on Internal Medicine Wards.Freda DeKeyser Ganz, Rotem Sharfi, Nehama Kaufman & Sharon Einav - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (6):1734-1743.
    Background: Cardio-pulmonary resuscitation is the default procedure during cardio-pulmonary arrest. If a patient does not want cardio-pulmonary resuscitation, then a do not attempt resuscitation order must be documented. Often, this order is not given; even if thought to be appropriate. This situation can lead to a slow code, defined as an ineffective resuscitation, where all resuscitation procedures are not performed or done slowly. Research objectives: To describe the perceptions of nurses working on internal medicine wards of slow codes, including the (...)
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  27.  7
    Palliative Care Nursing Involvement in End-of-Life Decision-Making: Qualitative Secondary Analysis.Pablo Hernández-Marrero, Emília Fradique & Sandra Martins Pereira - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (6):1680-1695.
    Background: Nurses are the largest professional group in healthcare and those who make more decisions. In 2014, the Committee on Bioethics of the Council of Europe launched the “Guide on the decision-making process regarding medical treatment in end-of-life situations”, aiming at improving decision-making processes and empowering professionals in making end-of-life decisions. The Guide does not mention nurses explicitly. Objectives: To analyze the ethical principles most valued by nurses working in palliative care when making end-of-life decisions and investigate if they are (...)
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  28.  4
    End-of-Life Care in a Nursing Home: Assistant Nurses’ Perspectives.Bodil Holmberg, Ingrid Hellström & Jane Österlind - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (6):1721-1733.
    Background: Worldwide, older persons lack access to palliative care. In Sweden, many older persons die in nursing homes where care is provided foremost by assistant nurses. Due to a lack of beds, admission is seldom granted until the older persons have complex care needs and are already in a palliative phase when they move in. Objective: To describe assistant nurses’ perspectives of providing care to older persons at the end of life in a nursing home. Research design: Data were collected (...)
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  29.  11
    Patients’ Perception of Dignity in Iranian General Hospital Settings.Fahimeh Alsadat Hosseini, Marzieh Momennasab, Shahrzad Yektatalab & Armin Zareiyan - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (6):1777-1790.
    Background: Dignified care is one of the main objectives of holistic care. Furthermore, paying attention to dignity as one of the fundamental rights of patients is extremely important. However, in many cases, the dignity of hospitalized patients is not considered. Dignity is an abstract concept, and comprehensive studies of the dignity of Iranian patients hospitalized in general hospital settings are limited. Objective: The aim of this study was to explore the concept of dignity from the perspective of patients hospitalized in (...)
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  30.  8
    Patient Autonomy in Home Care: Nurses’ Relational Practices of Responsibility.Gaby Jacobs - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (6):1638-1653.
    Background: Over the last decade, new healthcare policies are transforming healthcare practices towards independent living and self-care of older people and people with a chronic disease or disability within the community. For professional caregivers in home care, such as nurses, this requires a shift from a caring attitude towards the promotion of patient autonomy. Aim: To explore how nurses in home care deal with the transformation towards fostering patient autonomy and self-care. Research design and context: A case study was conducted (...)
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  31.  16
    Lecture-Based Versus Problem-Based Learning in Ethics Education Among Nursing Students.Mahnaz Khatiban, Seyede Nayereh Falahan, Roya Amini, Afshin Farahanchi & Alireza Soltanian - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (6):1753-1764.
    Background: Moral reasoning is a vital skill in the nursing profession. Teaching moral reasoning to students is necessary toward promoting nursing ethics. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of problem-based learning and lecture-based methods in ethics education in improving moral decision-making, moral reasoning, moral development, and practical reasoning among nursing students. Research design: This is a repeated measurement quasi-experimental study. Participants and research context: The participants were nursing students in a University of Medical Sciences in (...)
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  32.  7
    Ethical Challenges Experienced by Public Health Nurses Related to Adolescents’ Use of Visual Technologies.Hilde Laholt, Kim McLeod, Marilys Guillemin, Ellinor Beddari & Geir Lorem - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (6):1822-1833.
    Background: Visual technologies are central to youth culture and are often the preferred communication means of adolescents. Although these tools can be beneficial in fostering relations, adolescents’ use of visual technologies and social media also raises ethical concerns. Aims: We explored how school public health nurses identify and resolve the ethical challenges involved in the use of visual technologies in health dialogues with adolescents. Research design: This is a qualitative study utilizing data from focus group discussions. Participants and research context: (...)
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  33.  5
    Contrasts in Older Persons’ Experiences and Significant Others’ Perceptions of Existential Loneliness.Helena Larsson, Anna-Karin Edberg, Ingrid Bolmsjö & Margareta Rämgård - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (6):1623-1637.
    Background: As frail older people might have difficulties in expressing themselves, their needs are often interpreted by others, for example, by significant others, whose information health care staff often have to rely on. This, in turn, can put health care staff in ethically difficult situations, where they have to choose between alternative courses of action. One aspect that might be especially difficult to express is that of existential loneliness. We have only sparse knowledge about whether, and in what way, the (...)
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  34.  9
    The Paradoxical Body: A Glimpse of a Deeper Truth Through Relatives’ Stories.Vibeke Bruun Lorentsen, Dagfinn Nåden & Berit Sæteren - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (6):1611-1622.
    Background: People with progressive cancer experience that their bodies change due to disease and/or treatment. The body is integral to the unity of the human being, a unity that must be perceived as whole if dignity shall be experienced. Relatives are in touch with the suffering bodies of their dear ones, physically, socially, mentally, and existentially, and thus the relatives’ experiences of the bodies of their dear ones might yield insight into the concept of dignity. Aim: The aim of this (...)
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  35.  8
    Nudging in Nursing.Anne Helene Mortensen, Marita Nordhaug & Vibeke Lohne - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (6):1601-1610.
    Nudging is a concept in behavioural science, political theory and economics that proposes indirect suggestions to try to achieve non-forced compliance and to influence the decision making and behaviour of groups and individuals. Researchers in medical ethics are currently discussing whether nudging is ethically permissible in healthcare. In this article, we examine current knowledge about how different decisions are made and how this decision-making process pertains to patients. We view this knowledge in light of the nursing project and the ongoing (...)
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  36.  9
    Impediments to the Formation of Intensive Care Nurses' Professional Identify.Somayeh Mousazadeh, Shahrzad Yektatalab, Marzieh Momennasab & Soroor Parvizy - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (6):1873-1885.
    Background: Nurses face challenges regarding professional identify. Being unaware of these challenges and not owning positive professional identify leads to a lack of self-confidence. Thus, nurses face problems in interpersonal communication and lose their attachment to their profession. Few studies have engaged with impediments to forming positive professional identity in relation to intensive care nurses. Objective: The purpose of this study is to investigate the impediments to forming positive professional identity in nurses working in intensive care unit. Research design: In (...)
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  37.  3
    Ethical Issues Experienced During Palliative Care Provision in Nursing Homes.Deborah H. L. Muldrew, Dorry McLaughlin & Kevin Brazil - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (6):1848-1860.
    Background: Palliative care is acknowledged as an appropriate approach to support older people in nursing homes. Ethical issues arise from many aspects of palliative care provision in nursing homes; however, they have not been investigated in this context. Aim: To explore the ethical issues associated with palliative care in nursing homes in the United Kingdom. Design: Exploratory, sequential, mixed-methods design. Methods: Semi-structured interviews with 13 registered nurses and 10 healthcare assistants working in 13 nursing homes in the United Kingdom were (...)
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  38.  6
    Opportunity to Discuss Ethical Issues During Clinical Learning Experience.Alvisa Palese, Silvia Gonella, Anne Destrebecq, Irene Mansutti, Stefano Terzoni, Michela Morsanutto, Pietro Altini, Anita Bevilacqua, Anna Brugnolli, Federica Canzan, Adriana Dal Ponte, Laura De Biasio, Adriana Fascì, Silvia Grosso, Franco Mantovan, Oliva Marognolli, Raffaela Nicotera, Giulia Randon, Morena Tollini, Luisa Saiani, Luca Grassetti & Valerio Dimonte - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (6):1665-1679.
    Background: Undergraduate nursing students have been documented to experience ethical distress during their clinical training and felt poorly supported in discussing the ethical issues they encountered. Research aims: This study was aimed at exploring nursing students’ perceived opportunity to discuss ethical issues that emerged during their clinical learning experience and associated factors. Research design: An Italian national cross-sectional study design was performed in 2015–2016. Participants were invited to answer a questionnaire composed of four sections regarding: socio-demographic data, previous clinical learning (...)
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  39.  11
    Individualized Care Scale-Patient: A Spanish Validation Study.Beatriz Rodríguez-Martín, Raúl Martin-Martin & Riitta Suhonen - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (6):1791-1804.
    Background: I suggest this individualized care is a fundamental principle closely linked to nursing ethics and has important benefits for the patients, however, nurses do not always take into consideration the principles of individualized care. Moreover, there is no validated instrument to assess patients’ views of individualized care in Spanish-speaking countries. Objectives: To assess the validity and reliability of the Spanish version of the Individualized Care Scale-patient. Design: A cross-sectional study design was conducted. A questionnaire survey, including the Individualized Care (...)
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  40.  5
    Nurses’, Patients’, and Family Caregivers’ Perceptions of Compassionate Nursing Care.Banafsheh Tehranineshat, Mahnaz Rakhshan, Camellia Torabizadeh & Mohammad Fararouei - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (6):1707-1720.
    Background: Compassion is the core of nursing care and the basis of ethical codes. Due to the complex and abstract nature of this concept, there is a need for further investigations to explore the meaning and identify compassionate nursing care. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to identify and describe compassionate nursing care based on the experiences of nurses, patients, and family caregivers. Research design: This was a qualitative exploratory study. Data were analyzed using the conventional content analysis method. (...)
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  41.  25
    Empathy in the Nurse–Patient Relationship in Geriatric Care: An Integrative Review.Tiago José Silveira Teófilo, Rafaella Felix Serafim Veras, Valkênia Alves Silva, Nilza Maria Cunha, Jacira dos Santos Oliveira & Selene Cordeiro Vasconcelos - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (6):1585-1600.
    Introduction: Empathy is a complex human experience that involves the subjective intersection of different individuals. In the context of nursing care in the geriatric setting, the benefits of empathetic relationships are directly related to the quality of the practice of nursing. Objective: Analyze scientific production on the benefits of empathy in the nurse–patient relationship in the geriatric care setting. Methods: An integrative review of the literature was performed using the PubMed, Cochrane, CINAHL, Scopus, PsycINFO, and Web of Science databases. The (...)
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  42.  5
    Operating Room Nurses’ Perception of Professional Values.Camellia Torabizadeh, Fatemeh Darari & Shahrzad Yektatalab - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (6):1765-1776.
    Background and significance of research: Nurses’ awareness of professional values and how those values affect their behaviors is an integral part of nursing care. There is a large body of research on nursing professional values, however, a careful survey of the available literature did not yield any studies investigating the status of professional values in operating rooms. Objective: This study aims to investigate the perception of operating room nurses of university hospitals toward professional values. Research plan: In this cross-sectional study, (...)
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  43.  7
    Relational Autonomy in Action: Rethinking Dementia and Sexuality in Care Facilities.Elizabeth Victor & Laura Guidry-Grimes - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (6):1654-1664.
    Background: Caregivers and administrators in long-term facilities have fragile moral work in caring for residents with dementia. Residents are susceptible to barriers and vulnerabilities associated with the most intimate aspects of their lives, including how they express themselves sexually. The conditions for sexual agency are directly affected by caregivers’ perceptions and attitudes, as well as facility policies. Objective: This article aims to clarify how to approach capacity determinations as it relates to sexual activity, propose how to theorize about patient autonomy (...)
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  44.  3
    Perspectives Toward Brain Death Diagnosis and Management of the Potential Organ Donor.João Paulo Victorino, Karina Dal Sasso Mendes, Úrsula Marcondes Westin, Jennifer Tatisa Jubileu Magro, Carlos Alexandre Curylofo Corsi & Carla Aparecida Arena Ventura - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (6):1886-1896.
    Background: Organ donation and transplantation represent one of the most important scientific advances over the last decades. Due to the complexity of these procedures and related ethical–legal aspects, however, there are a lot of doubts and uncertainty about the brain death diagnosis and the maintenance of potential organ donor. Aim: To identify and discuss the different meanings and experiences of registered nurses and physicians from an adult intensive care unit in relation to the diagnosis of brain death and the maintenance (...)
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  45.  16
    Effects of Ethical Leadership on Nurses’ Service Behaviors.Na Zhang, Mingfang Li, Zhenxing Gong & Dingxin Xu - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (6):1861-1872.
    Background: Nurses’ service behaviors have critical implications for hospitals. However, few studies had adequate ethical considerations of service behaviors and accounted for how organizational or individual antecedents can induce nurses to engage in service behaviors. In addition, they mainly focused on the one side of role-prescribed or extra-role service behavior. Objective: This study aims to explore the chained mediation effect of ethical climate and moral sensitivity on the relationship between organizational ethical leadership and nurses’ service behaviors and to examine the (...)
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  46.  16
    Resource Allocation and Rationing in Nursing Care: A Discussion Paper.P. Anne Scott, Clare Harvey, Heike Felzmann, Riitta Suhonen, Monika Habermann, Kristin Halvorsen, Karin Christiansen, Luisa Toffoli & Evridiki Papastavrou - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (5):1528-1539.
    Driven by interests in workforce planning and patient safety, a growing body of literature has begun to identify the reality and the prevalence of missed nursing care, also specified as care left undone, rationed care or unfinished care. Empirical studies and conceptual considerations have focused on structural issues such as staffing, as well as on outcome issues – missed care/unfinished care. Philosophical and ethical aspects of unfinished care are largely unexplored. Thus, while internationally studies highlight instances of covert rationing/missed care/care (...)
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  47.  17
    Relationship Between Nurses’ Moral Sensitivity and the Quality of Care.Elham Amiri, Hossein Ebrahimi, Maryam Vahidi, Mohamad Asghari Jafarabadi & Hossein Namdar Areshtanab - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (4):1265-1273.
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  48.  11
    Evaluating Nurse Understanding and Participation in the Informed Consent Process.Sydney A. Axson, Nicholas A. Giordano, Robin M. Hermann & Connie M. Ulrich - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (4):1050-1061.
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  49.  18
    An Aristotelian View of Therapists' Practice in Multifamily Therapy for Young Adults with Severe Eating Disorders.Berit Støre Brinchmann, Cathrine Moe, Mildrid Elisabeth Valvik, Steven Balmbra, Siri Lyngmo & Tove Skarbø - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (4):1149-1159.
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  50.  14
    Lying to Patients with Dementia: Attitudes Versus Behaviours in Nurses.Daniela Cantone, Francesco Attena, Sabrina Cerrone, Antonio Fabozzi, Riccardo Rossiello, Laura Spagnoli & Concetta Paola Pelullo - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (4):984-992.
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  51.  11
    Service Evaluation: A Grey Area of Research?Lu-Yen A. Chen & Tonks N. Fawcett - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (4):1172-1185.
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  52.  12
    Clinical Governance Breakdown: Australian Cases of Wilful Blindness and Whistleblowing.Sonja Cleary & Maxine Duke - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (4):1039-1049.
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  53.  12
    Enhancing the Professional Dignity of Midwives: A Phenomenological Study.Christelle Froneman, Neltjie C. Van Wyk & Ramadimetja S. Mogale - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (4):1062-1074.
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  54.  9
    Can We Right the Wrongs of the Past?Ann Gallagher - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (4):955-957.
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  55.  10
    The Mediating Effect of Ethical Climate on Religious Orientation and Ethical Behavior.Zahra Marzieh Hassanian & Arezoo Shayan - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (4):1114-1127.
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  56.  9
    Convergence and Divergence: An Analysis of Mechanical Restraints.Jean Daniel Jacob, Dave Holmes, Désiré Rioux, Pascale Corneau & Colleen MacPhee - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (4):1009-1026.
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  57.  11
    Effects of an Ethical Empowerment Program on Critical Care Nurses’ Ethical Decision-Making.Fatemeh Jamshidian, Mohsen Shahriari & Mohsen Rezaei Aderyani - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (4):1256-1264.
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  58.  14
    Impact of Ethical Factors on Job Satisfaction Among Korean Nurses.Yujin Jang & Younjae Oh - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (4):1186-1198.
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  59.  11
    How to Succeed with Ethics Reflection Groups in Community Healthcare? Professionals’ Perceptions.Heidi Karlsen, Lillian Lillemoen, Morten Magelssen, Reidun Førde, Reidar Pedersen & Elisabeth Gjerberg - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (4):1243-1255.
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  60.  32
    Truth-Telling, Decision-Making, and Ethics Among Cancer Patients in Nursing Practice in China.Dong-Lan Ling, Hong-Jing Yu & Hui-Ling Guo - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (4):1000-1008.
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  61.  15
    The Effect of Nurses’ Ethical Leadership and Ethical Climate Perceptions on Job Satisfaction.Dilek Özden, Gülşah Gürol Arslan, Büşra Ertuğrul & Salih Karakaya - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (4):1211-1225.
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  62.  10
    Robots and People with Dementia: Unintended Consequences and Moral Hazard.Fiachra O’Brolcháin - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (4):962-972.
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  63.  20
    Conflict Between Nursing Student’s Personal Beliefs and Professional Nursing Values.David Pickles, Sheryl de Lacey & Lindy King - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (4):1087-1100.
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  64.  22
    A Second-Order Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Moral Distress Scale-Revised for Nurses.Hamid Sharif Nia, Vida Shafipour, Kelly-Ann Allen, Mohammad Reza Heidari, Jamshid Yazdani-Charati & Armin Zareiyan - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (4):1199-1210.
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  65.  10
    Psychometric Evaluation of the Moral Distress Scale–Revised Among Iranian Nurses.Mohammad Ali Soleimani, Saeed Pahlevan Sharif, Ameneh Yaghoobzadeh & Bianca Panarello - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (4):1226-1242.
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  66.  18
    Spiritual Well-Being and Moral Distress Among Iranian Nurses.Mohammad Ali Soleimani, Saeed Pahlevan Sharif, Ameneh Yaghoobzadeh, Mohammad Reza Sheikhi, Bianca Panarello & Ma Thin Mar Win - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (4):1101-1113.
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  67.  19
    Nurse Leaders’ Role in Medical Assistance in Dying: A Relational Ethics Approach.Tracy Thiele & Jennifer Dunsford - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (4):993-999.
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  68.  12
    Ethical Decision-Making Based on Field Assessment: The Experiences of Prehospital Personnel.Mohammad Torabi, Fariba Borhani, Abbas Abbaszadeh & Foroozan Atashzadeh-Shoorideh - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (4):1075-1086.
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  69.  14
    Opinions of Nurses Regarding Conscientious Objection.Rafael Toro-Flores, Pilar Bravo-Agüi, María Victoria Catalán-Gómez, Marisa González-Hernando, María Jesús Guijarro-Cenisergue, Margarita Moreno-Vázquez, Isabel Roch-Hamelin & Tamara Raquel Velasco-Sanz - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (4):1027-1038.
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  70.  9
    A Spoonful of Care Ethics: The Challenges of Enriching Medical Education.Eva van Reenen & Inge van Nistelrooij - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (4):1160-1171.
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  71.  6
    Reporting of Ethical Considerations in Clinical Trials in Chinese Nursing Journals.Yanni Wu, Michelle Howarth, Chunlan Zhou, Xue Ji, Jiexia Ou & Xiaojin Li - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (4):973-983.
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  72.  19
    Ethics in Nursing: A Systematic Review of the Framework of Evidence Perspective.Erman Yıldız - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (4):1128-1148.
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  73.  15
    A Hermeneutical Rapprochement Framework for Clinical Ethics Practice.Franco A. Carnevale - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (3):674-687.
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  74.  11
    Ethics and Quality Care in Nursing Homes: Relatives’ Experiences.Rita Jakobsen, Gerd Sylvi Sellevold, Veslemøy Egede-Nissen & Venke Sørlie - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (3):767-777.
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  75.  12
    The Grounded Theory of “Trust Building”.Monir Ramezani, Fazlollah Ahmadi, Eesa Mohammadi & Anoshirvan Kazemnejad - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (3):753-766.
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  76.  11
    Relationship Between Moral Distress and Ethical Climate with Job Satisfaction in Nurses.Sharareh Asgari, Vida Shafipour, Zohreh Taraghi & Jamshid Yazdani-Charati - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (2):346-356.
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  77.  11
    Towards an Ethics for Telehealth.Carlo Botrugno - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (2):357-367.
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  78.  8
    Pediatric Nurses’ Ethical Difficulties in the Bedside Care of Children.Kwisoon Choe, Yoonjung Kim & Yoonseo Yang - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (2):541-552.
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  79.  18
    Age Discrimination in Healthcare Institutions Perceived by Seniors and Students.Beata Dobrowolska, Bernadeta Jędrzejkiewicz, Anna Pilewska-Kozak, Danuta Zarzycka, Barbara Ślusarska, Alina Deluga, Aneta Kościołek & Alvisa Palese - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (2):443-459.
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  80.  8
    Potential Conflicts in Midwifery Practice Regarding Conscientious Objection to Abortions in Scotland.Valerie Fleming & Yvonne Robb - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (2):564-575.
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  81.  7
    The Ethics of ‘Frailty’.Ann Gallagher & Anna Cox - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (2):325-326.
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  82.  8
    Relationship Between Perceived Organizational Justice and Moral Distress in Intensive Care Unit Nurses.Ghazaleh Haghighinezhad, Foroozan Atashzadeh-Shoorideh, Tahereh Ashktorab, Jamileh Mohtashami & Maasoumeh Barkhordari-Sharifabad - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (2):460-470.
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  83.  17
    Are Contact Precautions Ethically Justifiable in Contemporary Hospital Care?Joanna Harris, Kenneth Walsh & Susan Dodds - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (2):611-624.
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  84.  17
    Just Healthcare and Human Flourishing: Why Resource Allocation is Not Just Enough.Jayne Hewitt - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (2):405-417.
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  85.  7
    The Home as Ethos of Caring: A Concept Determination.Yvonne Hilli & Katie Eriksson - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (2):425-433.
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  86.  6
    Nursing Student Attitudes Toward Euthanasia: A Cross-Sectional Study.Kazem Hosseinzadeh & Hossein Rafiei - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (2):496-503.
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  87.  9
    Ethical Dilemmas During Cardiac Arrest Incidents in the Patient’s Home.Mattias Karlsson, Niclas Karlsson & Yvonne Hilli - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (2):625-637.
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  88.  14
    On the Violation of Hospitalized Patients’ Rights: A Qualitative Study.Mojgan Khademi, Eesa Mohammadi & Zohreh Vanaki - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (2):576-586.
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  89.  17
    Ethical Climate in Nursing Environment: A Scoping Review.Janika Koskenvuori, Olivia Numminen & Riitta Suhonen - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (2):327-345.
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  90.  6
    Dual Loyalties: Everyday Ethical Problems of Registered Nurses and Physicians in Combat Zones.Kristina Lundberg, Sofia Kjellström & Lars Sandman - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (2):480-495.
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  91.  10
    An Assessment of Advance Relatives Approach for Brain Death Organ Donation.Carine Michaut, Antoine Baumann, Hélène Gregoire, Corinne Laviale, Gérard Audibert & Xavier Ducrocq - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (2):553-563.
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  92.  17
    Dignity in Nursing Care: What Does It Mean to Nursing Students?Rosemary F. Mullen, Angela Kydd, Anne Fleming & Laura McMillan - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (2):390-404.
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  93.  16
    Whistle-Blowing Process in Healthcare: From Suspicion to Action.Johanna Pohjanoksa, Minna Stolt, Riitta Suhonen, Eliisa Löyttyniemi & Helena Leino-Kilpi - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (2):526-540.
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  94.  9
    Dignity Realization of Patients with Stroke in Hospital Care: A Grounded Theory.Sunna Rannikko, Minna Stolt, Riitta Suhonen & Helena Leino-Kilpi - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (2):378-389.
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  95.  25
    Equity in Nursing Care: A Grounded Theory Study.Zahra Rooddehghan, Zohreh ParsaYekta & Alireza N. Nasrabadi - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (2):598-610.
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  96.  8
    Hermeneutic Caring Conversations in Forensic Psychiatric Caring.Kenneth Rydenlund, Unni Å Lindström & Arne Rehnsfeldt - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (2):515-525.
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  97.  19
    Psychometric Evaluation of the Moral Distress Risk Scale: A Methodological Study.Rafaela Schaefer, Elma L. C. P. Zoboli & Margarida M. Vieira - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (2):434-442.
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  98.  17
    Quality Dementia Care: Prerequisites and Relational Ethics Among Multicultural Healthcare Providers.Gerd Sylvi Sellevold, Veslemøy Egede-Nissen, Rita Jakobsen & Venke Sørlie - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (2):504-514.
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  99.  15
    The Ambiguity of Altruism in Nursing: A Qualitative Study.Anna Slettmyr, Anna Schandl & Maria Arman - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (2):368-377.
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  100.  10
    Lives and Choices, Give and Take: Altruism and Organ Procurement.Vicky Thornton - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (2):587-597.
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  101.  7
    Weighing Obligations to Home Care Workers and Medicaid Recipients.Paul C. Treacy & Douglas MacKay - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (2):418-424.
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  102.  8
    Lack of Compassion or Poor Discretion? Ways of Addressing Malpractice.Bodil Tveit & Anne Raustøl - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (2):471-479.
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  103.  10
    The Silent World of Young Next of Kin in Mental Healthcare.Elin Håkonsen Martinsen, Bente M. Weimand, Reidar Pedersen & Reidun Norvoll - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (1):212-223.
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