Nursing Ethics

ISSN: 0969-7330

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  1.  20
    Ethical issues in long-term care settings: Care workers’ lived experiences.Anna-Liisa Arjama, Riitta Suhonen & Mari Kangasniemi - 2024 - Nursing Ethics 31 (2-3):213-226.
    Background Professional care workers face ethical issues in long-term care settings (LTCS) for older adults. They need to be independent and responsible, despite limited resources, a shortage of skilled professionals, global and societal changes, and the negative reputation of LTCS work. Research aim Our aim was to describe the care workers’ lived experiences of ethical issues. The findings can be used to gain new perspectives and to guide decision-making to improve the quality of care, occupational well-being and nursing education. Research (...)
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  2.  15
    Ambulance clinicians’ understanding of older patients’ self-determination: A vignette study.Anna Bennesved, Anders Bremer, Anders Svensson, Andreas Rantala & Mats Holmberg - 2024 - Nursing Ethics 31 (2-3):342-354.
    Background Older patients are often vulnerable and highly dependent on healthcare professionals’ assessment in the event of acute illness. In the context of ambulance services, this poses challenges as the assessment is normally conducted with a focus on identifying life-threatening conditions. Such assessment is not fully satisfactory in a patient relationship that also aims to promote and protect patient autonomy. Aim To describe ambulance clinicians’ understanding of older patients’ self-determination when the patient’s decision-making ability is impaired. Research design A qualitative (...)
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  3.  52
    Respecting the free will, authenticity and autonomy of transgender youth.Leonie Crosse - 2024 - Nursing Ethics 31 (2-3):331-341.
    Transgender and gender diverse (TGD) youth are currently being targeted by global anti-trans legislation that would prevent their access to gender-affirming care even by healthcare providers willing to deliver it and who understand the importance of this support. It has been suggested in some studies that transness in young people is a result of peer contagion. As such their free will, authenticity and autonomy could be brought into question when accessing gender-affirming care. It is important to explore the relevance of (...)
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  4.  8
    A deliberative framework to assess the justifiability of strike action in healthcare.Ryan Essex - 2024 - Nursing Ethics 31 (2-3):148-160.
    Healthcare strikes have been a remarkably common and varied phenomenon. Strikes have taken a number of forms, lasting from days to months, involving a range of different staff and impacting a range of healthcare systems, structured and resourced vastly differently. While there has been much debate about strike action, this appears to have done little to resolve the often polarising debate that surrounds such action. Building on the existing normative literature and a recent synthesis of the empirical literature, this paper (...)
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  5.  18
    The nurses’ perception of the factors influencing professional misconduct: A qualitative study.Akram Ghobadi, Leila Sayadi, Nahid Dehghan Nayeri, Alireza Namazi Shabestari & Shokoh Varaei - 2024 - Nursing Ethics 31 (2-3):281-295.
    Background Professional misconduct undermines safe and quality care; however, little is known about its nature and influential factors. Aim This study aimed to explain the factors influencing professional misconduct in nurses. Research Design This qualitative study was conducted using the conventional content analysis method. Participants and Research Context Data were collected using semi-structured interviews with 19 nurses working in the hospital selected through a purposeful method and analyzed by Graneheim and Lundman approach. Ethical Considerations The ethics committee of Tehran University (...)
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  6.  84
    Professional responsibility, nurses, and conscientious objection: A framework for ethical evaluation.Pamela J. Grace, Elizabeth Peter, Vicki D. Lachman, Norah L. Johnson, Deborah J. Kenny & Lucia D. Wocial - 2024 - Nursing Ethics 31 (2-3):243-255.
    Conscientious objections (CO) can be disruptive in a variety of ways and may disadvantage patients and colleagues who must step-in to assume care. Nevertheless, nurses have a right and responsibility to object to participation in interventions that would seriously harm their sense of integrity. This is an ethical problem of balancing risks and responsibilities related to patient care. Here we explore the problem and propose a nonlinear framework for exploring the authenticity of a claim of CO from the perspective of (...)
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  7.  26
    Midwifery students’ experiences: Violations of dignity during childbirth.Arezoo Haseli, Shahla Khosravi, Saiedeh Sadat Hajimirzaie, Rozhin Feli & Dara Rasoal - 2024 - Nursing Ethics 31 (2-3):296-310.
    Background The principle of human dignity is woven into the ethical principles of the midwifery profession, noted as both an obligation and a human right. Research Objectives The aim of this study is to explore the experiences of midwifery students regarding threats to women's dignity during childbirth. Research Design This is a qualitative study with explorative design. Participants and Research Context: The research was carried out in 2022 at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, involving 32 midwifery students in individual interviews (...)
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  8.  15
    Two cases of nursing older nursing home residents during COVID-19.Pier Jaarsma, Petra Gelhaus & My Eklund Saksberg - 2024 - Nursing Ethics 31 (2-3):256-267.
    Introduction Two ethical challenges of nursing home nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic in Sweden are discussed in this paper. Background Historically, the nurse’s primary concern is for the person who is ill, which is the core of nurses’ moral responsibility and identity. In Sweden, person-centered care is generally deemed important in nursing older nursing home residents. Objective To chart moral responsibilities of nursing home nurses in two cases involving older residents during the COVID-19 pandemic in Sweden. Methods We used Margaret (...)
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  9.  21
    The effect of cognitive flexibility in nurses on attitudes to professional autonomy.Züleyha Kılıç, Nurcan Uzdil & Yurdagül Günaydın - 2024 - Nursing Ethics 31 (2-3):321-330.
    Background Professional autonomy, which directly affects the quality of professional nursing in patient care, and cognitive flexibility, which is an important factor for adaptation to change and developing nursing roles, are important concepts for nursing. Research objectives This research was carried out to determine the effect of cognitive flexibility on attitudes towards professional autonomy in nurses. Research design This was a descriptive study. Participants and research context The research was conducted with 415 nurses working in a city hospital of a (...)
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  10.  7
    Ethical Challenges to the Self-care of Nurses during the Covid-19 Pandemic.Arpi Manookian, Nahid Dehghan Nayeri, Seemin Dashti & Mehraban Shahmari - 2024 - Nursing Ethics 31 (2-3):161-175.
    Background The emerging working conditions triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic have imposed numerous ethical challenges on the nurses, which, in turn, can negatively impact the nurses’ physical and mental health, and thus their work performance through intensifying negative emotions and psychological pressures. Aim The purpose of this study was to highlight the nurses’ perceptions of the ethical challenges that they faced regarding their self-care during the COVID-19 pandemic. Research design A qualitative, descriptive study with a content analysis approach. Participants and (...)
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  11.  20
    Participatory management effects on nurses’ organizational support and moral distress.Mahdieh Hasanzadeh Moghadam, Fatemeh Heshmati Nabavi, Hamid Heydarian Miri, Amir Reza Saleh Moghadam & Seyedmohammad Mirhosseini - 2024 - Nursing Ethics 31 (2-3):202-212.
    Research question/aim/objectives Providing care for hospitalized children causes moral distress to nurses. Employee participation in discovering and solving the everyday problems of the workplace is one of the ways to hear the voices of nurses. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of participatory management programs on perceived organizational support and moral distress in pediatric nurses. Research design A quasi-experimental study. Participants and research context The present study was conducted on 114 pediatric nurses in Iran. Data were collected using the (...)
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  12.  39
    Ethical challenges as perceived by nurses in pediatric oncology units.Fateme Mohammadi, Zeinab Naderi, Leila Nikrouz, Khodayar Oshvandi, Seyedeh Zahra Masoumi, Parisa Sabetsarvestani & Mostafa Bijani - 2024 - Nursing Ethics 31 (2-3):268-280.
    Background Providing care to children with cancer is one of the most challenging areas of ethical care for nurses. Few studies have addressed nurses’ perception of the barriers to giving ethical care in oncology departments. Thus, it is essential that the ethical challenges in caregiving as perceived by oncology nurses be investigated. Objective The present study was conducted to investigate the ethical challenges as perceived by nurses in pediatric oncology units in the south of Iran. Research design The present study (...)
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  13.  11
    Residents’ experiences of paternalism in nursing homes.Anne Helene Mortensen, Dagfinn Nåden, Dag Karterud & Vibeke Lohne - 2024 - Nursing Ethics 31 (2-3):176-188.
    Background Interest in strengthening residents’ autonomy in nursing homes is intensifying and professional caregivers’ experience ethical dilemmas when the principles of beneficence and autonomy conflict. This increased focus requires expanded knowledge of how residents experience decision-making in nursing homes and how being subject to paternalism affects residents’ dignity. Research question/aim This study explored how residents experience paternalism in nursing homes. Research design This study involved a qualitative interpretive design with participant observations and semi-structured interviews. The interpretations were informed by Gadamer’s (...)
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  14.  29
    Workplace incivility and the professional quality of life in nurses.Shima Nazari, Nasrin Nikpeyma, Shima Haghani, Fatemeh Fakhuri & Pouya Farokhnezhad Afshar - 2024 - Nursing Ethics 31 (2-3):311-320.
    Background Workplace Incivility is a common issue in the nursing profession. Nurses who are affected by such behaviors may experience distress. Objectives This study aimed to assess the relationship between workplace incivility and nurses’ professional quality of life. Research design This cross-sectional correlational study was conducted in 2021 in “Tehran”. Data were collected using a demographic questionnaire, the Nursing Incivility Scale (NIS), and the Professional Quality Of Life scale (ProQOL). Data analysis was performed through the Pearson correlation and multiple linear (...)
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  15.  12
    Empathy and ethical sensitivity among intensive and critical care nurses: A path analysis.Amir Masoud Sharifnia, Heidi Green, Ritin Fernandez & Ibrahim Alananzeh - 2024 - Nursing Ethics 31 (2-3):227-242.
    Background Intensive and critical care nurses need to demonstrate ethical sensitivity especially in recognizing and dealing with ethical dilemmas particularly as they often care for patients living with life-threatening conditions. Theories suggest that there is a convergence between nurses’ empathy and ethical sensitivity. Evidence in the literature indicates that nurses’ emotional, demographic, and work characteristics are associated with their level of empathy and ethical sensitivity. Aim To investigate the relationship between nurses’ empathy and ethical sensitivity, considering their emotional states (depression, (...)
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  16.  3
    Is nursing ethics education in disarray?Paul Snelling & Ann Gallagher - 2024 - Nursing Ethics 31 (2-3):129-131.
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  17.  16
    Unveiling the burden of compassion fatigue in nurses.Halil İbrahim Taşdemir, Ruveyde Aydın, Fatma Dursun Ergezen, Deniz Taşdemir & Yahya Ergezen - 2024 - Nursing Ethics 31 (2-3):371-387.
    Background The COVID-19 pandemic has placed an unprecedented burden on nurses who have been at the forefront of patient care. The continuous exposure to suffering, death, and overwhelming demands has the potential to lead to compassion fatigue, a state of emotional, physical, and cognitive exhaustion. Research aim The study aimed to explore and understand the phenomenon of compassion fatigue in nurses as the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic. Research design A constructivist grounded theory design was used. Participants and research context (...)
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  18.  10
    Moral resilience in registered nurses: Cultural adaption and validation study.Xu Tian, Qiaoling He, Xiaoling Liu, Xiuni Gan & María F. Jiménez Herrera - 2024 - Nursing Ethics 31 (2-3):355-370.
    Background Healthcare professionals, especially professional nurses, experience various types of moral suffering due to inevitable ethical conflicts. Moral resilience is recently proposed as a resource to address moral suffering. However, there is no tool to measure moral resilience in Chinese professional nurses. Aim This study aimed to translate the Rushton Moral Resilience Scale (RMRS) into Chinese and evaluate the psychometric properties of the Chinese version of RMRS (Chi-RMRS). Research design A methodological and descriptive research design. Participants and research context A (...)
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  19.  25
    Moral distress, psychological capital, and burnout in registered nurses.Bowen Xue, Shujin Wang, Dandan Chen, Zhiguo Hu, Yaping Feng & Hong Luo - 2024 - Nursing Ethics 31 (2-3):388-400.
    Aims This study aimed to explore the relationship among moral distress, psychological capital, and burnout in registered nurses. Ethical consideration The study was approved by the Ethics Committee of the School of Nursing, Hangzhou Normal University (Approval no. 2022001). Methods A cross-sectional descriptive survey was conducted with a convenience sample of 397 nurses from three Grade-A tertiary hospitals in Zhejiang Province, China. Participants completed demographic information, the Nurses’ Moral Distress Scale, the Nurses’ Psychological Capital Scale, and the Maslach Burnout Inventory (...)
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  20.  7
    Alleviating suffering of individuals with multimorbidity and complex needs: A descriptive qualitative study.Ahtisham Younas & Shahzad Inayat - 2024 - Nursing Ethics 31 (2-3):189-201.
    Background Individuals living with multimorbidity and/or mental health issues, low education, socioeconomic status, and polypharmacy are often called complex patients. The complexity of their health and social care needs can make them prone to disease burden and suffering. Therefore, they frequently access health care services to seek guidance for managing their illness and suffering. Aims The aim of this research was to describe the approaches used by nurses to alleviate the suffering of individuals with multimorbidity and complex needs in acute (...)
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  21.  27
    The effect of flipped-jigsaw learning models on ethical decision-making.Nasibe Yağmur Ziyai, Ramazan Bozkurt, Hatice Kilickiran & Ozlem Dogu - 2024 - Nursing Ethics 31 (2-3):132-147.
    Background Ethical decision-making education in nursing can be taught effectively by combining different teaching models that support the visualisation of taught concepts and integrating theory into practice. Objectives The study aims to examine the effect of flipped and jigsaw learning models on ethical decision-making and ethical sensitivity in nursing. Research design We used a nested mixed design. A pretest-posttest single-group quasi-experimental design was used in the quantitative part, and a case study method was used in the qualitative part. Participants and (...)
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  22.  10
    Characteristics of a good nurse as perceived by nurses.Samireh Abedin, Zahra Khademi, Hesamaddin Kamalzadeh & Razieh Beigi Broujeni - 2024 - Nursing Ethics 31 (1):79-88.
    Background Nursing is a humanitarian and social field that provides health services. It combines science and art and has a rich history. Despite fundamental changes in the provision of medical services and nursing education, the concept of “good nurse” is still unclear. Purpose The purpose of this article is to investigate the characteristics of a good nurse from the nurses’ perspective. Research design and method A qualitative study was applied using conventional content analysis. The participants were 30 nurses that selected (...)
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  23.  11
    A concept analysis of misconduct: Application to nursing education.Said Al Abrawi - 2024 - Nursing Ethics 31 (1):89-100.
    Background Behavior is known as misconduct when individuals do not adhere to ethical standards, rules, or regulations. Several factors lead to misconduct, including the lack of understanding of what misconduct is among undergraduate students. However, misconduct as a concept needs more clarity and specificity. Objective This study aimed to examine the concept of misconduct from the literature and establish an operational definition for application to nursing education. Research design A concept analysis using Rodger’s evolutionary view was used to analyze the (...)
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  24.  14
    Pandemic ethics and beyond: Creating space for virtues in the social professions.Sarah Banks - 2024 - Nursing Ethics 31 (1):28-38.
    Background During the pandemic, social and health care professionals operated in ‘crisis conditions’. Some existing rules/protocols were not operational, many services were closed/curtailed, and new ‘blanket’ rules often seemed inappropriate or unfair. These experiences provide fertile ground for exploring the role of virtues in professional life and considering lessons for professional ethics in the future. Research design and aim This article draws on an international qualitative survey conducted online in May 2020, which aimed to explore the ethical challenges experienced by (...)
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  25.  17
    Brave spaces in nursing ethics education: Courage through pedagogy.Natalie Jean Ford, Larissa Marie Gomes & Stephen B. R. E. Brown - 2024 - Nursing Ethics 31 (1):101-113.
    Background Nursing students must graduate prepared to bravely enact the art and science of nursing in environments infiltrated with ethical challenges. Given the necessity and moral obligation of nurses to engage in discourse within nursing ethics, nursing students must be provided a moral supportive learning space for these opportunities. Situating conversations and pedagogy within a brave space may offer a framework to engage in civil discourse while fostering moral courage for learners. Research Objective The aim of this research is to (...)
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  26.  28
    The complexity of ethical assessment: Interdisciplinary challenge for character education.Juan Luis Fuentes & Yaiza Sánchez-Pérez - 2024 - Nursing Ethics 31 (1):65-78.
    The assessment of learning in the ethical domain is one of the most complex aspects to attend in the educational context. In recent years, character education has contributed greatly to different social disciplines, such as education or nursing. However, the development of this approach has run up against several obstacles and limitations, as there is little evidence regarding its long-term effectiveness or its evaluation. This essay aims to identify some of the main difficulties to assess learning in the ethical domain, (...)
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  27.  15
    Beyond compassion fatigue, compassion as a virtue.John Camilo Garcia-Uribe & Boris Julian Pinto-Bustamante - 2024 - Nursing Ethics 31 (1):114-123.
    One of the great problems of caregivers and health professionals in recent times has been the so-called compassion fatigue and its association with burnout syndrome. Another pole of compassion has been described in terms of compassion satisfaction. Both propositions could be problematic in the caregiving setting. This is an analytical reflective article that through an apparent aporia tries to problematize and propose a theoretical synthesis that allows to denote compassion as a virtue in Aristotelian terms. To this end, it resorts (...)
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  28.  8
    Special issue: Cultivating character for care.Janet Holt & Ann Gallagher - 2024 - Nursing Ethics 31 (1):3-6.
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  29.  10
    Two variants of ‘constrained participation’ in the care of vulnerable adults: A proof-of-concept study.Kristján Kristjánsson & Kristín Thórarinsdóttir - 2024 - Nursing Ethics 31 (1):39-51.
    There has been a radical turn towards ideals of patient autonomy and person-centred care, and away from historically entrenched forms of medical paternalism, in the last 50 years of nursing practice. However, along the way, some shades of grey between the areas of ideal patient participation and of outright patient non-participation have been missed. The current article constitutes an exploratory proof-of-concept study of the real-world traction of a distinction-straddling concept of ‘constrained participation’ and its two sub-concepts of ‘fought-for participation’ and (...)
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  30.  10
    Moral failure, moral prudence, and character challenges in residential care during the Covid-19 pandemic.Settimio Monteverde - 2024 - Nursing Ethics 31 (1):17-27.
    In many high-income countries, an initial response to the severe impact of Covid-19 on residential care was to shield residents from outside contacts. As the pandemic progressed, these measures have been increasingly questioned, given their detrimental impact on residents’ health and well-being and their dubious effectiveness. Many authorities have been hesitant in adapting visiting policies, often leaving nursing homes to act on their own safety and liability considerations. Against this backdrop, this article discusses the appropriateness of viewing the continuation of (...)
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  31.  4
    Am I my students’ nurse? Reflections on the nursing ethics of nursing education.Paul Snelling - 2024 - Nursing Ethics 31 (1):52-64.
    Despite having worked in higher education for over twenty years, I am still, first and foremost, a practicing nurse. My employer requires me to be a nurse and my regulator regards what I do as nursing. My practice is regulated by the Code and informed by nursing ethics. If I am nurse, practicing nursing, does that mean that my students are my patients? This paper considers how the relationship that I have with my students can be informed by the ethics (...)
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  32.  6
    Bodily contrast experiences in cultivating character for care.Linus Vanlaere & Roger Burggraeve - 2024 - Nursing Ethics 31 (1):7-16.
    Since 2008, in Flanders, we organize immersion sessions in a simulated context with the aim of stimulating student nurses and health professionals to learn virtuous caring. In this contribution, we first outline the purpose of this experiential learning: the cultivation of moral character. We come to the core of what we mean by moral character for care. We refer to Joan Tronto and Stan van Hooft to claim that caring is central to all aspects of nursing practice and is the (...)
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