59 found

Year:

  1.  1
    Moral Distress Interventions: An Integrative Literature Review.Vanessa K. Amos & Elizabeth Epstein - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (3):582-607.
    Moral distress has been well reviewed in the literature with established deleterious side effects for all healthcare professionals, including nurses, physicians, and others. Yet, little is known about the quality and effectiveness of interventions directed to address moral distress. The aim of this integrative review is to analyze published intervention studies to determine their efficacy and applicability across hospital settings. Of the initial 1373 articles discovered in October 2020, 18 were appraised as relevant, with 1 study added by hand search (...)
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  2.  1
    Ethical Reflection Support for Potential Organ Donors' Relatives: A Narrative Review.Antoine Baumann, Nathalie Thilly, Liliane Joseph & Frédérique Claudot - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (3):660-674.
    Background: Even in countries with an opt-out or presumed consent system, relatives have a considerable influence on the post-mortem organ harvesting decision. However, their reflection capacity may be compromised by grief, and they are, therefore, often prone to choose refusal as default option. Quite often, it results in late remorse and dissatisfaction. So, a high-quality reflection support seems critical to enable them to gain a stable position and a long-term peace of mind, and also avoid undue loss of potential grafts. (...)
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  3. Nurses’ Involvement in End-of-Life Decisions in Neonatal Intensive Care Units.Ilias Chatziioannidis, Abraham Pouliakis, Marina Cuttini, Theodora Boutsikou, Evangelia Giougi, Voula Volaki, Rozeta Sokou, Theodoros Xanthos, Zoi Iliodromiti & Nicoletta Iacovidou - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (3):569-581.
    Background: End-of-life decision-making for terminally ill neonates raises important legal and ethical issues. In Greece, no recent data on nurses’ attitudes and involvement in end-of-life decisions are available. Research question/aim: To investigate neonatal nurses’ attitudes and involvement in end-of-life decisions and the relation to their socio-demographic and work-related background data. Research design: A survey was carried out in 28 neonatal intensive care units between September 2018 and January 2019. A structured questionnaire was distributed by post. Participants and research context: The (...)
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  4.  1
    Nurses’ Values on Medical Aid in Dying: A Qualitative Analysis.Judy E. Davidson, Liz Stokes, Marcia S. DeWolf Bosek, Martha Turner, Genesis Bojorquez, Youn-Shin Lee & Michele Upvall - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (3):636-650.
    Aim: Explore nurses’ values and perceptions regarding the practice of medical aid in dying. Background: Medical aid in dying is becoming increasing legal in the United States. The laws and American Nurses Association documents limit nursing involvement in this practice. Nurses’ values regarding this controversial topic are poorly understood. Methodology: Cross-sectional electronic survey design sent to nurse members of the American Nurses Association. Inductive thematic content analysis was applied to open-ended comments. Ethical Considerations: Approved by the institutional review board. Participants: (...)
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  5.  1
    Care-Deficits and Polarization: Why the Time is Ripe for a Universal Care Conscription.Bouke de Vries - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (3):709-718.
    A large share of countries is struggling to provide adequate care to their older populations. To deal with this challenge, philosopher Ingrid Robeyns has advocated legislation that requires citizens to spend 1 year of their life providing dependency care. My aim of this contribution is to strengthen the case for this proposal, which I will refer to as a ‘universal care conscription’. I do so by defending this type of conscription against various alternative ways of addressing care-deficits that have been (...)
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  6. Redefining Nursing Solidarity.Marta Domingo-Osle & Rafael Domingo - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (3):651-659.
    The idea of solidarity is in vogue, especially since the eruption of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, the term “solidarity,” as used in nursing, is imprecise and vague, lacking clear definition and connoting a variety of general meanings. Based on the original meaning of “solidarity” in ancient Roman law, this article captures the archetypical idea of solidarity from a historical and interdisciplinary perspective. This archetypical or primary meaning comes before the development of any other meanings of the word, and it is (...)
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  7. Cultivating Character for Care.Ann Gallagher - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (3):525-526.
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  8.  1
    Compassionate Nursing Care Model: Results From a Grounded Theory Study.Mansour Ghafourifard, Vahid Zamanzadeh, Leila Valizadeh & Azad Rahmani - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (3):621-635.
    Compassion, as an indicator for quality care, is highly valued by patients and healthcare professionals. Compassionate care is considered a moral dimension of nursing practice and an essential component of high quality care. This study aimed to answer these questions: What are the facilitators and barriers of providing compassionate nursing care in the clinical setting? Which strategies do nurses use to provide compassionate care? What is the specific model of compassionate care for the nursing context? A grounded theory approach was (...)
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  9.  1
    ‘Blurred Boundaries’: When Nurses and Midwives Give Anti-Vaccination Advice on Facebook.Janet Green, Julia Petty, Lisa Whiting, Fiona Orr, Larissa Smart, Ann-Marie Brown & Linda Jones - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (3):552-568.
    Background: Nurses and midwives have a professional obligation to promote health and prevent disease, and therefore they have an essential role to play in vaccination. Despite this, some nurses and midwives have been found to take an anti-vaccination stance and promulgate misinformation about vaccines, often using Facebook as a platform to do so. Research question: This article reports on one component and dataset from a larger study – ‘the positives, perils and pitfalls of Facebook for nurses’. It explores the specific (...)
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  10.  1
    Preserving Client Autonomy When Guiding Medicine Taking in Telehomecare: A Conversation Analytic Case Study.Sakari Ilomäki & Johanna Ruusuvuori - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (3):719-732.
    Background: Enhancing client autonomy requires close coordination of interactional practices between nurse and client, which can cause challenges when interaction takes place in video-mediated settings. While video-mediated services have become more common, it remains unclear how they shape client autonomy in telehomecare. Research aim: To analyse how video mediation shapes client autonomy when nurses guide medicine taking remotely through video-mediated home care. Research design: This is a conversation analytic case study using video recordings of telehomecare encounters. The theoretical approach draws (...)
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  11.  1
    Conflicts Between Parents and Clinicians: Tracheotomy Decisions and Clinical Bioethics Consultation.Kristi Klee, Benjamin Wilfond, Karen Thomas & Debra Ridling - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (3):685-695.
    Background: The parent of a child with profound cognitive disability will have complex decisions to consider throughout the life of their child. An especially complex decision is whether to place a tracheotomy to support the child’s airway. The decision may involve the parent wanting a tracheotomy and the clinician advising against this intervention or the clinician recommending a tracheotomy while the parent is opposed to the intervention. This conflict over what is best for the child may lead to a bioethics (...)
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  12. Acknowledging Caregivers’ Vulnerability in the Managment of Challenging Behaviours to Reduce Control Measures in Psychiatry.Jean Lefèvre-Utile, Marjorie Montreuil, Amélie Perron, Aymeric Reyre & Franco Carnevale - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (3):758-779.
    Background: The management of challenging behaviours in inpatient with intellectual disability and/or autism spectrum disorders can lead to an escalation of control measures. In these complex situations where patients have an intellectual disability/autism spectrum disorder accompanied by a psychiatric comorbidity, the experiences of caregivers related to the crisis management have rarely been studied. Purpose: This study examined the moral experiences of caregivers related to challenging behaviours’ management and alternatives to control measures. Research design: Using Charles Taylor’s hermeneutic framework, a 2-month (...)
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  13. The Influential Factors in Humanistic Critical Care Nursing.Somaye Mohamadi Asl, Mojgan Khademi & Eesa Mohammadi - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (3):608-620.
    Background: One of the main concerns in critical care units is the development of humanistic approaches. In this regard, recognizing the factors affecting humanistic nursing can contribute to humanizing nursing care in these units. Objective: The objective was to recognize the influential factors of humanistic nursing in critical care units. Research design: This qualitative study was carried out using a phenomenology method. Thirty-nine in-depth unstructured interviews were performed. The data were analyzed using the phenomenological nursology approach. To guarantee trustworthiness, prolonged (...)
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  14. Experiences of Critical Care Nurses During the Early Months of the COVID-19 Pandemic.Dorothy James Moore, Denise Dawkins, Michelle DeCoux Hampton & Susan McNiesh - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (3):540-551.
    Background: Critical care nurses have risked their lives and in some cases their families through hazardous duty during the COVID-19 pandemic and have faced multiple ethical challenges. Research/aim: The purpose of our study was to examine how critical care nurses coped with the sustained multi-faceted pressures of the critical care environment during the unchartered waters of the COVID-19 pandemic. It was anticipated that our study might reveal numerous ethical challenges and decision points. Research design: A qualitative descriptive study, utilizing an (...)
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  15.  1
    The Duty to Care and Nurses’ Well-Being During a Pandemic.C. Amparo Muñoz-Rubilar, Carolina Pezoa Carrillos, Ingunn Pernille Mundal, Carlos De las Cuevas & Mariela Loreto Lara-Cabrera - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (3):527-539.
    Background: The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic is impacting the delivery of healthcare worldwide, creating dilemmas related to the duty to care. Although understanding the ethical dilemmas about the duty to care among nurses is necessary to allow effective preparation, few studies have explored these concerns. Aim: This study aimed to identify the ethical dilemmas among clinical nurses in Spain and Chile. It primarily aimed to identify nurses’ agreement with the duty to care despite high risks for themselves and/or their families, (...)
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  16. Nurses' Awareness and Adherence with National Ethical Guidelines for Research in North India.Suresh K. Sharma - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (3):733-741.
    Background: A large number of nurse researchers do not adhere to ethical standards while performing the research. Moreover, there is far less data on knowledge of existing national ethical guidelines. This study was, therefore, done to assess awareness and adherence to current national ethical guidelines among nursing students and faculty members. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was done among nursing faculty members and theses carried out by postgraduate nursing students between 2012 and 2017. Using the convenience sampling technique, seven states (...)
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  17. Dignity of Nursing Students in Clinical Learning Environments.Banafsheh Tehranineshat & Camellia Torabizadeh - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (3):742-757.
    As an important professional value, dignity has always been an ethical concern in nursing education and practice. However, the dignity of nursing students in clinical environments has remained a little-discussed topic. This study aims to explore and describe nursing students’ dignity in clinical learning environments. This study is a qualitative descriptive work in which data were collected via semi-structured, in-depth, individual interviews and subsequently analyzed according to conventional content analysis. Based on the inclusion criteria of the study, nursing students were (...)
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  18.  1
    Advance Care Planning in Dementia Care: Wants, Beliefs, and Insight.Annika Tetrault, Maj-Helen Nyback, Heli Vaartio-Rajalin & Lisbeth Fagerström - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (3):696-708.
    Background: Advance care planning gives patients and their family members the possibility to consider and make decisions regarding future care and medical procedures. Aim: To explore the view of people in the early stage of dementia on planning for future care. Research design: The study is a qualitative interview study with a semistructured interview guide. The data were analyzed according to the Qualitative Analysis Guide of Leuven. Participants and research context: Dementia nurses assisted in the recruiting of people with dementia (...)
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  19. Nurses’ Perception of Workplace Discrimination.Fatemeh ZareKhafri, Camellia Torabizadeh & Azita Jaberi - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (3):675-684.
    Background: Discrimination and injustice are big obstacles in nurses’ way to socialization and are among the major clinical challenges faced by nurses. Workplace discrimination is associated with such negative consequences as stress, fatigue, demoralization, loss of professional commitment, tension and conflicts at work, and resignation. A review of literature shows that not much research has been dedicated to workplace discrimination in nursing. Objective: This study aims to investigate nurses’ perception of workplace discrimination. Method: This cross-sectional study was conducted in the (...)
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  20.  1
    Defining and Characterising the Nurse–Patient Relationship: A Concept Analysis.Regina Allande-Cussó, Elena Fernández-García & Ana María Porcel-Gálvez - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (2):462-484.
    The nurse-patient relationship involves complex attitudes and behaviours with ethical and deontological implications. It has been linked to improvements in patient health outcomes, although there is still no consensus in the scientific literature as to the definition and characterisation of the concept. This article aim to define the concept of the nurse-patient relationship. A concept analysis was conducted using the Walker and Avant method to identify the attributes defining the nurse-patient relationship. An integrative review of the literature was conducted using (...)
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  21.  1
    Impact of Profession and Wards on Moral Distress in a Community Hospital.Karim Bayanzay, Behzad Amoozgar, Varun Kaushal, Alissa Holman, Valentina Som & Shuvendu Sen - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (2):356-363.
    Background: Recently, a singular survey titled “Measure of Moral Distress—Healthcare Professionals,” which addresses shortcomings of previous instruments, has been validated. Aim: To determine how moral distress affects nurses and physicians differently across the various wards of a community hospital. Participant and research context: We distributed a self-administered, validated survey titled “Measure of Moral Distress—Healthcare Professionals” to all nurses and physicians in the medical/surgical ward, telemetry ward, intensive care units, and emergency rooms of a community hospital. Findings: A total of 101 (...)
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  22.  1
    The Process of Moral Distress Development: A Virtue Ethics Perspective.Carolina S. Caram, Elizabeth Peter, Flávia R. S. Ramos & Maria J. M. Brito - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (2):402-412.
    This theoretical paper proposes a new perspective to understand the moral distress of nurses more fully, using virtue ethics. Moral distress is a widely studied subject, especially with respect to the determination of its causes and manifestations. Increasing the theoretical depth of previous work using ethical theory, however, can create new possibilities for moral distress to be explored and analyzed. Drawing on more recent work in this field, we explicate the conceptual framework of the process of moral distress in nurses, (...)
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  23.  1
    Moral Distress in Midwifery Practice: A Concept Analysis.Wendy Foster, Lois McKellar, Julie Fleet & Linda Sweet - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (2):364-383.
    Research suggests that the incidence of moral distress experienced by health professionals is significant and increasing, yet the concept lacks clarity and remains largely misunderstood. Currently, there is limited understanding of moral distress in the context of midwifery practice. The term moral distress was first used to label the psychological distress experienced following complex ethical decision-making and moral constraint in nursing. The term is now used across multiple health professions including midwifery, nursing, pharmacy and medicine, yet is used cautiously due (...)
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  24. The Role of Nurses' Professional Values During the COVID-19 Crisis.David González-Pando, Covadonga González-Nuevo, Ana González-Menéndez, Fernando Alonso-Pérez & Marcelino Cuesta - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (2):293-303.
    Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has produced high stress in nurses, affecting their professional quality of life. Different variables affect psychological stress response and professional quality of life. In this context, the role of professional values represents an interesting object of research. Objectives: To analyze the relationship between professional values, perceived stress, and professional quality of life among nurses during the COVID-19 crisis. Research design, participants, and research context: Descriptive cross-sectional study. Participants were 439 registered nurses from the public health system. (...)
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  25. Pre-Decision Regret Before Transition of Dependents with Severe Dementia to Long-Term Care.Ingrid Hanssen, Flora M. Mkhonto, Hilde Øieren, Malmsey L. M. Sengane, Anne Lene Sørensen & Phuong Thai Minh Tran - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (2):344-355.
    Background: To place a dependent with severe dementia in a nursing home is a painful and difficult decision to make. In collectivistic oriented societies or families, children tend to be socialised to care for ageing parents and to experience guilt and shame if they violate this principle. Leaving the care to professional caregivers does not conform with the cultural expectations of many ethnic groups and becomes a sign of the family’s moral failure. Research design: Qualitative design with individual in-depth interviews (...)
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  26.  1
    Ethical Dilemmas in Nursing Documentation.Lone Jørgensen & Mette Geil Kollerup - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (2):485-497.
    Background: Nursing documentation is an essential aspect of ethical nursing care. Lack of awareness of ethical dilemmas in nursing documentation may increase the risk of patient harm. Considering this, ethical dilemmas within nursing documentation need to be explored. Aim: To explore ethical dilemmas in nurses’ conversations about nursing documentation. Research design, participants and context: The study used a qualitative design. Participants were registered nurses from a Patient Hotel at a Danish University Hospital. Data were collected in three focus groups with (...)
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  27.  1
    Dignity and Attitudes to Aging: A Cross-Sectional Study of Older Adults.Helena Kisvetrová, Petra Mandysová, Jitka Tomanová & Alison Steven - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (2):413-424.
    Background: Dignity is a multidimensional construct that includes perception, knowledge, and emotions related to competence or respect. Attitudes to aging are a comprehensive personal view of the experience of aging over the course of life, which can be influenced by various factors, such as the levels of health and self-sufficiency and social, psychological, or demographic factors. Aim: The purpose of this study was to explore the attitudes to aging of home-dwelling and inpatient older adults, and whether dignity and other selected (...)
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  28.  1
    Viewing the Image? Ultrasound Examination During Abortion Preparations, Ethical Challenges.Marianne Kjelsvik, Ragnhild J. T. Sekse, Elin M. Aasen & Eva Gjengedal - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (2):511-522.
    During preparation for early abortion in Norway, an ultrasound examination is usually performed to determine gestation and viability. This article aims to provide a deeper understanding of women’s and health care personnel’s experiences with ultrasound viewing during abortion preparation in the first trimester. Qualitative in-depth interviews with women who had been prepared for early abortion and focus group interviews with HCP from gynaecological units were carried out. A hermeneutic-phenomenological analysis, inspired by van Manen, was chosen. Thirteen women who were pregnant (...)
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  29.  2
    Humanizing Intensive Care: A Scoping Review.Monica Evelyn Kvande, Sanne Angel & Anne Højager Nielsen - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (2):498-510.
    Significant scientific and technological advances in intensive care have been made. However, patients in the intensive care unit may experience discomfort, loss of control, and surreal experiences. This has generated relevant debates about how to humanize the intensive care units and whether humanization is necessary at all. This paper aimed to explore how humanizing intensive care is described in the literature. A scoping review was performed. Studies published between 01.01.1999 and 02.03.2020 were identified in the CINAHL, Embase, PubMed, and Scopus (...)
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  30.  1
    Moral Distress in Nursing Students: Cultural Adaptation and Validation Study.Rocco Mazzotta, Maddalena De Maria, Davide Bove, Sondra Badolamenti, Simonì Saraiva Bordignon, Luana Claudia Jacoby Silveira, Ercole Vellone, Rosaria Alvaro & Giampiera Bulfone - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (2):384-401.
    Background: Moral distress, defined as moral suffering or a psychological imbalance, can affect nursing students. However, many new instruments or adaptations of other scales that are typically used to measure moral distress have not been used for nursing students. Aim: This study aimed to translate, culturally adapt and evaluate the psychometric properties of an Italian version of the Moral Distress Scale for Nursing Students for use with delayed nursing students. Research design: The study used a cross-sectional research design. Participants and (...)
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  31.  1
    Hand Hygiene Monitoring Technology: A Descriptive Study of Ethics and Acceptance in Nursing.Michael Meng, Anna-Henrikje Seidlein & Christiane Kugler - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (2):436-447.
    Background: Nosocomial infections represent a serious challenge for healthcare systems worldwide. Adherence to hand hygiene plays a major role in infection prevention and control. These adherence rates can be improved through behaviour tracking innovations. This requires the systems to be widely implemented and accepted. Therefore, both a systematic analysis of the normative issues related and the evaluation of technology acceptance are equally important. Objectives: To explore and describe relevant aspects regarding the acceptance of technology and ethical implications using a tracking (...)
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  32.  1
    Caregiver Decision-Making Concerning Involuntary Treatment in Dementia Care at Home.Vincent R. A. Moermans, Angela M. H. J. Mengelers, Michel H. C. Bleijlevens, Hilde Verbeek, Bernadette Dierckx de Casterle, Koen Milisen, Elizabeth Capezuti & Jan P. H. Hamers - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (2):330-343.
    Background: Dementia care at home often involves decisions in which the caregiver must weigh safety concerns with respect for autonomy. These dilemmas can lead to situations where caregivers provide care against the will of persons living with dementia, referred to as involuntary treatment. To prevent this, insight is needed into how family caregivers of persons living with dementia deal with care situations that can lead to involuntary treatment. Objective: To identify and describe family caregivers’ experiences regarding care decisions for situations (...)
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  33. Workplace Challenges and Nurses Recovered From COVID-19.Farshad Mohammadi, Moloud Radfar & Masumeh Hemmati Maslak Pak - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (2):280-292.
    Background: Although many studies have addressed COVID-19, the challenges faced by nurses in their workplace after recovering from this disease have not been investigated. As the backbone of the health system and at the forefront of the fight against COVID-19, nurses are exposed to serious risks of infection and even death. They may also face numerous challenges in their workplace after recovering from COVID-19. It is therefore ethically recommended that the problems of these nurses be solved to increase their job (...)
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  34. Trends in East Asian Nurses Recognizing Ethical Behavioral Practices.Akiko Nishimura & Mitsuko Yamada - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (2):425-435.
    Background: Nurses are expected to make and implement autonomous decisions to provide patients with excellent quality nursing while practicing complex, high-level care. However, studies have shown that nursing practice based on autonomous decision-making is difficult, and a gap exists between decision-making and implementation. Research question/aim/objectives: This study aims to clarify trends among nursing professionals who recognize they are practicing ethical behavior in their nursing practice. Research design/Participants and research context: We surveyed the basic attributes of and used the Ode’s Ethical (...)
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  35.  1
    Ethical Challenges During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Perspectives of Nursing Students.Domingo Palacios-Ceña, Juan Francisco Velarde-García, Marta Mas Espejo, Raquel González-Hervías, Beatriz Álvarez-Embarba, Marta Rodríguez-García, Oscar Oliva-Fernández, Pilar González-Sanz, Paloma Moro-López-Menchero, César Fernández-de-las-Peñas & Jose Miguel Cachón-Pérez - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (2):264-279.
    Background: The first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic caused a shortage of qualified nurses in Spain. As a result, the government authorized the hiring of senior students. Objectives: To explore the ethical dilemmas and ethical conflicts experienced by final-year nursing students who worked during the first outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic in Spain. Research design: A qualitative exploratory study was conducted using purposive sampling. Semi-structured interviews were carried out using a question guide. Interviews took place via a private video chat (...)
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  36.  1
    Impact of Poetry-Based Ethics Education on the Moral Sensitivity of Nurses: A Semi-Experimental Study.Kobra Rashidi, Tahereh Ashktorab & Mehdi Birjandi - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (2):448-461.
    Background: The nurses’ moral sensitivity is the first step to make right decisions in difficult moral situations. Therefore, its education and promotion is highly important. Research objectives: The aim of this study was to examine the impact of poetry-based ethics education on the nurses’ moral sensitivity. Research design and methods: This was a semi-experimental study. The sample consisted of 108 nurses who were selected by convenience sampling method and randomly assigned to three groups: intervention with poetry, who read a booklet (...)
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  37.  1
    A Critical Incident Study of ICU Nurses During the COVID-19 Pandemic.Ann Rhéaume, Myriam Breau & Stéphanie Boudreau - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (2):317-329.
    Background: Intensive care unit nurses are providing care to COVID-19 patients in a stressful environment. Understanding intensive care unit nurses’ sources of distress is important when planning interventions to support them. Purpose: To describe Canadian intensive care unit nurse experiences providing care to COVID-19 patients during the second wave of the pandemic. Design: Qualitative descriptive component within a larger mixed-methods study. Participants and research context: Participants were invited to write down their experiences of a critical incident, which distressed them when (...)
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  38. Why We Need to Reconsider Moral Distress in Nursing.Daniel Sperling - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (2):261-263.
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  39. Effect of Ethical Nurse Leaders on Subordinates During Pandemics.Jinyi Zhou & Ke-fu Zhang - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (2):304-316.
    Background: As caring in times of pandemics becomes extremely stressful, the volume and intensity of nursing work witness significant increase. Ethical practices are therefore even more important for nurses and nurse leaders during this special period. Research aim: The aim was to explore the relationship between ethical nurse leaders and nurses’ task mastery and ostracism, and to examine the mediating role of relational identification in this relationship during pandemics. Research design: Based on social exchange theory, this study tests a theoretical (...)
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  40. Missed Nursing Care and its Relationship with Perceived Ethical Leadership.Gülşah Gürol Arslan, Dilek Özden, Gizem Göktuna & Büşra Ertuğrul - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (1):35-48.
    Background: Determination of the factors affecting missed nursing care and the impact of ethical leadership is important in improving the quality of care. Aim: This study aims to determine the missed nursing care and its relationship with perceived ethical leadership. Research design: A cross-sectional study. Participants and research context: The sample consisted of 233 nurses, of whom 92.7% were staff nurses and 7.3% were charge nurses, who work in three different hospitals in Turkey. The study data were collected using a (...)
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  41.  1
    Does Midwifery-Led Care Demonstrate Care Ethics: A Template Analysis.Kate Buchanan, Elizabeth Newnham, Deborah Ireson, Clare Davison & Sara Bayes - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (1):245-257.
    Background: Ethical care in maternity is fundamental to providing care that both prevents harm and does good, and yet, there is growing acknowledgement that disrespect and abuse routinely occur in this context, which indicates that current ethical frameworks are not adequate. Care ethics offers an alternative to the traditional biomedical ethical principles. Research aim: The aim of the study was to determine whether a correlation exists between midwifery-led care and care ethics as an important first step in an action research (...)
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  42.  1
    Tertiary Hospital Nurses’ Ethical Sensitivity and its Influencing Factors: A Cross-Sectional Study.Xue Lei Chen, Fei Fei Huang, Jie Zhang, Juan Li, Bi Yun Ye, Yun Xiang Chen, Yuan Hui Zhang, Fang Li, Chun Fang Yu & Jing Ping Zhang - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (1):104-113.
    Background: High ethical sensitivity positively affects the quality of nursing care; nevertheless, Chinese nurses’ ethical sensitivity and the factors influencing it have not been described. Research objectives: The purpose of this study was to describe ethical sensitivity and to explore factors influencing it among Chinese-registered nurses, to help nursing administrators improve nurses’ ethical sensitivity, build harmony between nurses and patients, and promote the patients’ health. Research design: This was a descriptive, cross-sectional study. Participants and research context: We recruited 500 nurses (...)
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  43.  1
    Professional Codes of Conduct: A Scoping Review.Derek Collings-Hughes, Ruth Townsend & Brett Williams - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (1):19-34.
    Background: Professional ethical codes are an important part of healthcare. They are part of the professionalisation of an occupation, are used for regulation of the professions and are intended to guide ethical behaviour in healthcare. However, so far, little is known about the practical use of professional codes in healthcare, particularly in paramedicine. Objective: The aim of this scoping review was to determine what is known in the existing literature about health professionals’ knowledge, awareness and use of their professional codes. (...)
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  44.  1
    Clinician Distress in Seriously Ill Patient Care: A Dimensional Analysis.Anessa M. Foxwell, Salimah H. Meghani & Connie M. Ulrich - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (1):72-93.
    Background: Caring for patients with serious illness may severely strain clinicians causing distress and probable poor patient outcomes. Unfortunately, clinician distress and its impact historically has received little attention. Research purpose: The purpose of this article was to investigate the nature of clinician distress. Research design: Qualitative inductive dimensional analysis. Participants and research context: After review of 577 articles from health sciences databases, a total of 33 articles were eligible for analysis. Ethical considerations: This study did not require ethical review (...)
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  45.  1
    Admission to Undergraduate Nurse Education Programmes: Who Should Be Selected?Ann Gallagher & Fiona Timmins - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (1):3-6.
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  46.  1
    Compassion Fatigue as Bruises in the Soul: A Qualitative Study on Nurses.Tove Gustafsson & Jessica Hemberg - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (1):157-170.
    Background: Nurses who are constantly being exposed to patients’ suffering can lead to compassion fatigue. There is a gap in the latest research regarding nurses’ experiences of compassion fatigue. Little is known about how compassion fatigue affects the nurse as a person, and indications of how it affects the profession are scarce. Aim: The aim of this study was to explore compassion fatigue experienced by nurses and how it affects them as persons and professionals. Research design, participants, and research context: (...)
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  47. Intensified Job Demands, Stress of Conscience and Nurses' Experiences During Organizational Change.Mikko Heikkilä, Mari Huhtala, Saija Mauno & Taru Feldt - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (1):217-230.
    Background: Nurses frequently face ethically demanding situations in their work, and these may lead to stress of conscience. Working life is currently accelerating and job demands are intensifying. These intensified job demands include work intensification, intensified job-related planning demands, intensified career-related planning demands, and intensified learning demands. At the same time, many healthcare organizations are implementing major organizational changes that have an influence on personnel. Aim: The aim of the study was to investigate the association between intensified job demands and (...)
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  48. Midwifery Students' Experiences of Support for Ethical Competence.Leena Honkavuo - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (1):145-156.
    Background: Midwifery students are confronted with several ethical dilemmas and challenging situations during clinical midwifery care practice. Since ethical competence of midwifery students is under development, it is important to support the students’ learning progress of ethical issues from diverse viewpoints. Objective: From the perspective of didactics of caring science and the context of midwifery students, to explore how midwifery students’ experience supports for ethical competence in midwifery education and investigate how ethically challenging situations have been carried out during clinical (...)
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  49.  1
    Coping with Moral Distress on Acute Psychiatric Wards: A Qualitative Study.Trine-Lise Jansen, Marit Helene Hem, Lars Johan Danbolt & Ingrid Hanssen - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (1):171-180.
    Background: Nurses working within acute psychiatric settings often face multifaceted moral dilemmas and incompatible demands. Methods: Qualitative individual and focus group interviews were conducted. Ethical considerations: Approval was received from the Norwegian Social Science Data Services. Ethical Research Guidelines were followed. Participants and research context: Thirty nurses working within acute psychiatric wards in two mental health hospitals. Results: Various coping strategies were used: mentally sorting through their ethical dilemmas or bringing them to the leadership, not ‘bringing problems home’ after work (...)
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  50.  1
    Medical Assistance in Dying Legislation: Hospice Palliative Care Providers’ Perspectives.Soodabeh Joolaee, Anita Ho, Kristie Serota, Matthieu Hubert & Daniel Z. Buchman - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (1):231-244.
    Background: After over 4 years since medical assistance in dying legalization in Canada, there is still much uncertainty about how this ruling has affected Canadian society. Objective: To describe the positive aspects of medical assistance in dying legalization from the perspectives of hospice palliative care providers engaging in medical assistance in dying. Design: In this qualitative descriptive study, we conducted an inductive thematic analysis of semi-structured interviews with hospice palliative care providers. Participants and setting: Multi-disciplinary hospice palliative care providers in (...)
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  51. Comparison of Attitude of Nurses and Nursing Students Toward Euthanasia.Alireza Khatony, Masoud Fallahi, Mansour Rezaei & Somayeh Mahdavikian - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (1):208-216.
    Background: Euthanasia is a controversial issue in many countries. However, there is little evidence about attitudes of nurses and nursing students toward euthanasia. Research aims: The present study aimed to compare nurses and nursing students' attitudes toward euthanasia. Research design: This is a descriptive cross-sectional study. Participants and research context: Using census sampling, 390 nurses and 125 nursing students were enrolled in this study. Methods: Data were collected using a socio-demographic questionnaire and Euthanasia Attitude Scale that included 20 items that (...)
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  52.  1
    Measuring Nurses’ Moral Courage: An Explorative Study.Kasper Jean-Pierre Konings, Chris Gastmans, Olivia Hanneli Numminen, Roelant Claerhout, Glenn Aerts, Helena Leino-Kilpi & Bernadette Dierckx de Casterlé - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (1):114-130.
    Background: The 21-item Nurses’ Moral Courage Scale was developed and validated in 2018 in Finland with the purpose of measuring moral courage among nurses. Objectives: The objective of this study was to make a Dutch translation of the Nurses’ Moral Courage Scale to describe the level of nurses’ self-assessed moral courage and associated socio-demographic factors in Flanders, Belgium. Research design: A forward–backward translation method was applied to translate the English Nurses’ Moral Courage Scale to Dutch, and a pilot study was (...)
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  53. Establishing a Trusting Nurse-Immigrant Mother Relationship in the Neonatal Unit.Nina Margrethe Kynø & Ingrid Hanssen - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (1):63-71.
    Background: In the neonatal intensive care unit, immigrant parents may experience even greater anxiety than other parents, particularly if they and the nurses do not share a common language. Aim: To explore the complex issues of trust and the nurse–mother relationship in neonatal intensive care units when they do not share a common language. Design and methods: This study has a qualitative design. Individual semi-structured in-depth interviews and two focus group interviews were conducted with eight immigrant mothers and eight neonatal (...)
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  54. Ethical Dilemmas Faced by Frontline Support Nurses Fighting COVID-19.Xinyi Liu, Yingying Xu, Yuanyuan Chen, Chen Chen, Qiwei Wu, Huiwen Xu, Pingting Zhu & Ericka Waidley - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (1):7-18.
    Background: In 2019, an outbreak of COVID-19 broke out in Hubei, China. Medical workers from all over the country rushed to Hubei and participated in the treatment and care of COVID-19 patients. These nurses, dedicated to their professional practice, volunteered to provide compassion and expert clinical care during the pandemic. As with other acts of heroism, the ethical dilemmas associated with working on the front line must be considered for future practice. Purpose: To explore the ethical dilemmas of frontline nurses (...)
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  55.  2
    Clinical Ethics Committees in Nursing Homes: What Good Can They Do? Analysis of a Single Case Consultation.Morten Magelssen & Heidi Karlsen - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (1):94-103.
    Background: Ought nursing homes to establish clinical ethics committees? An answer to this question must begin with an understanding of how a clinical ethics committee might be beneficial in a nursing home context – to patients, next of kin, professionals, managers, and the institution. With the present article, we aim to contribute to such an understanding. Aim: We ask, in which ways can clinical ethics committees be helpful to stakeholders in a nursing home context? We describe in depth a clinical (...)
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  56. Assessment of Ethical Competence Among Clinical Nurses in Health Facilities.Veronica Mary Maluwa, Alfred Ochanza Maluwa, Gertrude Mwalabu & Gladys Msiska - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (1):181-193.
    Background: Ethical competence in nursing practice helps clinical nurses to think critically, analyse issues, make ethical decisions, solve ethical problems and behave ethically in their daily work. Thus, ethical competence contributes to the promotion of high-quality care. However, studies on ethical competence in Malawi are scanty. Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore ethical competence among clinical nurses in selected hospitals in Malawi. Methodology: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in four selected hospitals in Malawi with a sample of (...)
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  57. Ethics Review, Reflective Equilibrium and Reflexivity.Julie Morton - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (1):49-62.
    Background: Research Ethics Committees or their equivalent review applications for prospective research with human participants. Reviewers use universally agreed principles i to make decisions about whether prospective health and social care research is ethical. Close attention to understanding how reviewers go about their decision-making work and consider principles in practice is limited. Objective: The study aimed to understand how reviewers made decisions in the contexts of meetings and to understand more about how reviewers approach their work. The purpose of this (...)
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  58.  1
    Unprofessional Conduct by Nurses: A Document Analysis of Disciplinary Decisions.Oili Papinaho, Arja Häggman-Laitila & Mari Kangasniemi - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (1):131-144.
    Background: A small minority of nurses are investigated when they fail to meet the required professional standards. Unprofessional conduct does not just affect the nurse but also patients, colleagues and managers. However, it has not been clearly defined. Objective: The objective was to identify unprofessional conduct by registered nurses by examining disciplinary decisions by a national regulator. Design: A retrospective document analysis. Data and research context: Disciplinary decisions delivered to 204 registered nurses by the Finnish national regulatory authority from 2007 (...)
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  59.  1
    Discovering Dignity Through Experience: How Nursing Students Discover the Expression of Dignity.Tone Stikholmen, Dagfinn Nåden & Herdis Alvsvåg - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (1):194-207.
    Introduction: Dignity is a core value in nursing. Nursing education shall prepare students for ethical professional practice and facilitate insight into the phenomenon of dignity and its significance. There is limited knowledge about how nursing students discover dignity in their education. Research aim: The aim of the study is to develop an understanding of how nursing students discover and acquire dignity. Research design: The study has a hermeneutic approach where qualitative interviews of nursing students were employed. The process of interpretation (...)
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