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  1. Lev Shestov: A Russian Existentialist.Marina F. Bykova - 2017 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 55 (5):305-309.
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  2. Lev Shestov on Shakespeare’s Tragedy Julius Caesar.Nelly V. Motroshilova - 2017 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 55 (5):310-319.
    This article discusses Lev Shestov’s essay that analyzes Shakespeare’s tragedy Julius Caesar. The essay was included in Shestov’s book the Apotheosis of Groundlessness, and still remains largely unknown to a broader public. The article shows that the essay is less an analysis of a Shakespeare play and more an employment of Shakespeare’s themes and characters in order to challenge his killer heroes in the name of certain abstract principles that “sacrifice” both individuals and masses of humanity. The author also demonstrates (...)
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  3. A Never-Ending Dispute Over Morality.Vladimir N. Porus - 2017 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 55 (5):320-335.
    Leo Tolstoy’s Moralism is a call for the purification of moral universals as the foundations of culture, in which there is no contradiction between the values of an individual life and the values of the social “world.” A “moralist preacher” must fulfill two main requirements. First, he must personally fulfill the principles of his teaching. Second, he must be absolutely sure that he speaks on behalf of the truth he knows. Otherwise, his preaching will be deceptive and will serve the (...)
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  4. The Historicism of Lev Shestov and Gustav Shpet.Tatiana G. Shchedrina & Boris I. Pruzhinin - 2017 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 55 (5):336-349.
    The authors discuss two interpretations of Edmund Husserl’s phenomenology: by Lev Shestov and by Gustav Shpet. While each of these thinkers followed his own path, they shared an idea of historicism typical of Russian philosophy, a historicism related to the existential dimension of the human being. This article suggests that the interpretation of historicism in the tradition of “positive philosophy on Russian soil” was fruitful for the development of phenomenological topics in Shpet’s and Shestov’s hermeneutics.
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  5. In the Circle of Non-Vengeance.Julia V. Sineokaya - 2017 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 55 (5):350-363.
    The topic of this article is the principle of non-vengeance, or a denial of the spirit of revenge [der Geist der Rache – Ger.], and how it is conceptualized in Friedrich Nietzsche and Lev Shestov. Both thinkers make this principle central to their philosophical discussions. However, they have different motives and ways of realizing the principle in their theories. Nietzsche’s approach is manifested in his idea of the eternal recurrence, while for Shestov, the principle is rooted in his interpretation of (...)
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  6. Lev Shestov’s Ideas in the French Philosophical and Cultural Context.Ksenia V. Vorozhikhina - 2017 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 55 (5):364-375.
    The focus of this article is the influence of Lev Shestov’s ideas on European intellectuals, especially French philosophers and poets. The author shows that the Russian thinker had a significant impact on shaping the intellectual atmosphere in France at the first half of the twentieth century, contributing to the rise of existentialist philosophy. Among Shestov’s direct philosophical followers are literary critic, writer, and musicologist Boris de Schloezer; essayist and philosopher Georges Bataille; and poet Benjamin Fondane.
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  7. On the Place of the Russian Revolution in Russian History.Marina F. Bykova - 2017 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 55 (3-4):173-176.
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  8. Critical Commentary on the Concept of “Soviet Empire”.E. Letnyakov Denis - 2017 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 55 (3-4):293-304.
    “The National Question” relates to that sphere of social life in which the October Revolution has demonstrated the most radical rupture in “l’ancien régime.” From the very beginning, Soviet power used anti-colonial and anti-imperial language in reference to itself. However, over the last years, the prevailing academic view has regarded the Soviet Union as imperial. The author aims to problematize this view and show that in many cases the use of the concept of empire to describe Soviet reality rather prevents (...)
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  9.  1
    Revolution: The Transformations of the Semantic Field in Contemporary Political Philosophy.Maria M. Fedorova - 2017 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 55 (3-4):280-292.
    This article analyzes the change in the semantic field of the concept of revolution in the context of the perception of History. It is argued that the initial meanings of this concept first appeared in the early modern period at the intersection of the philosophy of history and the philosophy of politics to describe the radical new sociopolitical order and were closely associated with the concepts of social progress and emancipation. In many ways, the tragic experience of the twentieth century (...)
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  10. On the Subject Matter of the Concept of Revolution.G. Kapustin Boris - 2017 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 55 (3-4):265-279.
    This article disputes the possibility and reason for any general theory of revolution that claims to reveal the “essence” of this phenomenon without regard for the context in which any particular revolution occurs. The article describes revolutions as contingent and self-constituting events. Their triggers, but not their causes, are the dysfunctions of existing orders. Such events are a special kind of historical and political practice and are characterized primarily as the initiation of a mechanism that Kant called causation through freedom, (...)
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  11. The Russian Revolution in the Contemporary Context.Vadim M. Mezhuev - 2017 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 55 (3-4):227-238.
    The Russian Revolution of 1917 went down in history as yet another classic example of the general logic of the unfolding of the revolutionary process, starting with the proclamation of liberty and equality and ending with one-party dictatorship and terror. The present article argues that the common cause of all revolutions is the absence of a legal and legitimate means of obtaining power by the political opposition. This forces the opposition to resort to force, even armed methods of capturing power, (...)
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  12. The Year 1917: Sacrifices of History.Svetlana S. Neretina - 2017 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 55 (3-4):194-209.
    For Russia, the beginning of the twentieth century was a step into Modernity, into that pan-European new time that in the seventeenth century heralded a permanent social change, which has defined our entire epoch up to the present day—it was a time of transformation, war, and revolution.1 A concept of “revolution” that emerged within theology marked a global shift toward modernization, which defines Modernity even in those moments when there is a fallback to the preceding tradition, the meaning of which (...)
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  13. The October Revolution and the Constants of Russian Being.Sergey A. Nikolsky - 2017 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 55 (3-4):177-193.
    In the history of Russia’s development, there are clear, unchanging constants of empire, autocracy, and property as power. These are persistent structures that have existed over a long historical period, which are created by the state and society, and are upheld by tradition. On the one hand, they are restrictive, but on the other hand, they guide the direction of socioeconomic, sociopolitical, and cultural development, and also facilitate the emergence of the corresponding social actors and institutions. During the Russian revolutionary (...)
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  14. The Avant-Garde as Continuous Experience.Helen V. Petrovsky - 2017 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 55 (3-4):252-264.
    The present article considers the avant-garde as experience, and primarily as the experience of perceiving avant-garde art in terms of interruption, estrangement, and arrest. The focus is on the “internal”—utopian—time of the avant-garde, or the dimension of the social imagination. This is directly related to Walter Benjamin’s concept of history, and his idea of the interruption of time. The article analyzes the connection between the continuing interest in the avant-garde and the problem of representing utopia. Avant-garde art is considered as (...)
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  15. Nikolai Berdyaev on the “Spirits of the Russian Revolution”.Vladimir N. Porus - 2017 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 55 (3-4):210-226.
    This article analyzes Nikolai Berdyaev’s ideas concerning the spiritual origins of the 1917 Russian revolution. The philosopher believed that its sources were “demons” living in the Russian national spirit, discovered and awakened in the works of the Russian classics, such as Nikolai Gogol, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, and Leo Tolstoy. The main reason these demons were able to take hold of the Russian national consciousness was the collapse of everyday life, and the false orientation of this consciousness toward a violent establishment of (...)
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  16. The Creativity of Theatrical Geniuses in “the Proposed Circumstances” of the October Revolution.Tatiana S. Zlotnikova - 2017 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 55 (3-4):239-251.
    This article considers revolution as a political clash and revolutionism as an aesthetic position, which is a topic inspired by the philosophical, social, and aesthetic experience of the twentieth century. This topic has been considered on the eve of the 100-year anniversary of the October Revolution. The author proceeds from the claim that one of the theatrical geniuses, Vsevolod E. Meyerhold, was, above all, a man of politics, while the other, Yevgeny B. Vakhtangov, was first and foremost a man of (...)
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  17. In Memoriam of Teodor I. Oizerman.Marina F. Bykova - 2017 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 55 (2):85-88.
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  18. Teodor I. Oizerman: His Scholarship and Stages of His Intellectual Evolution.Ilya T. Kasavin - 2017 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 55 (2):89-97.
    The article discusses the intellectual biography of Teodor I. Oizerman. The main stages of the formation and development of Oizerman’s philosophy are considered within the context of the historical changes of twentieth-century Russia. The author identifies five main stages of Oizerman’s philosophical evolution and offers an overview of the main ideas that define each of these stages.
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  19.  2
    On a Critical Reflection on Dialectical Materialism.Teodor I. Oizerman - 2017 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 55 (2):98-121.
    This article offers an analysis of dialectical materialism. The author, being a supporter of this theory, offers a self-critical assessment of its foundations. He argues that the predecessors of Marxism constructed their systems with the confidence that they were building the true and only true philosophy. This utopian idea shared by Marx, Engels, and their successors was refuted by subsequent developments in philosophy. Indeed, philosophy by its very nature is pluralistic and interminable. Self-critical Marxism must recognize the legitimacy not only (...)
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  20.  1
    Does a Plurality of Philosophies Eliminate the Concept of the Subject Matter of Philosophy?Teodor I. Oizerman - 2017 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 55 (2):122-151.
    The author considers the claim about the existence of a unified subject matter of philosophy in the light of the existence of a diversity of philosophies. It is shown that a unified subject matter of philosophical inquiry for all historical periods is unfounded, and that Marxist attempts to give a universal definition of the subject matter of philosophy is inadequate. The author defends the position of a qualitative change in the subject matter of philosophy in the course of its development. (...)
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  21. The Ambivalence of Great Philosophies: Toward a Description of the Philosophical Systems of Kant and Hegel.Teodor I. Oizerman - 2017 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 55 (2):152-172.
    The author examines the philosophical doctrines of Kant and Hegel, and puts forward a thesis concerning the inner ambivalence of these doctrines. The thesis is supported with concrete examples demonstrating the internal contradictions in the philosophical systems of Kant and Hegel. The more a philosophical doctrine is meaningful and innovative, the more it is contradictory, ambivalent, and aporiastic, in spite of the efforts of its founder and followers to reconcile all of its major claims. This ambivalence, however, turns out to (...)
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  22. Technologies of the Electoral Process: A Field Study of the Possibility of Informative Communication.Alexander Yu Antonovsky - 2017 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 55 (1):37-48.
    The article focuses on the role of social technology in the Russian electoral process. On this basis, the author provides answers to more general issues concerning such questions as whether it is possible in the Russian context to combine social stability and informative political communication; whether a conflict-free processing of objective information can be achieved; whether political communication can extricate itself from self-referential isolation around the issue of social unity and address the real challenges facing society; and whether the authorities (...)
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  23.  1
    The Practical Tasks of Social Engineering and the Formation of the Social and Human Sciences.Alexandra A. Argamakova - 2017 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 55 (1):62-73.
    The article considers numerous factors that have influenced the formation and application of the social and human sciences. It shows that throughout history an orientation toward practice has always been a characteristic of these sciences. At the end of the Nineteenth and beginning of the Twentieth centuries, ideas related to the transformation of humanity and society fell under the rubric of social technologies and social engineering, which in recent years have experienced increasing prominence in modern science and technoculture.
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  24.  1
    Social Technologies: Between Science and Practice.Ilya T. Kasavin - 2017 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 55 (1):1-9.
    Social technologies are the active communicative manifestation of a social subject at the level of organizational, administrative, and social planning in the context of the social construction of knowledge and reality. A clear definition of social technologies must first describe them within the context of the social sciences and humanities: ST are the variety of social practices that are generated by these sciences. These include psychotherapeutic assistance, opinion polls, the practice of language translation, counseling, litigation, and the management of production. (...)
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  25. The Formation of Social Technologies: Stages and Examples.Ilya T. Kasavin - 2017 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 55 (1):10-25.
    The concept of “social technology,” as used in science and journalism, has yet to reach theoretical maturity. This is related to the general state of the social and human sciences, which have not given rise to sociotechnical sciences, and is also related to a number of sociopolitical circumstances. On the one hand, social technology involves solutions that require an empirical, interdisciplinary synthesis; on the other hand, it represents a series of new theoretical conceptualizations. The article offers a working definition of (...)
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  26. From Theory to Technology: The Case of Existential Psychotherapy.A. Kasavina Nadezhda - 2017 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 55 (1):74-84.
    The psychotherapeutic technologies of the social sciences and humanities are the result of a long process that has shaped its theory and social and therapeutic practice, as part of a specific cultural and ideological context. The use of these technologies as a fundamental prerequisite has a human factor that determines the implementation of communicative mechanisms within the framework of set goals and objectives. Psychotherapeutic technologies are based on a “theory of the human,” which is not a scientific theory in the (...)
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  27.  1
    The Turn in Social Investigations of Scientific Knowledge.Lyudmila A. Markova - 2017 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 55 (1):26-36.
    Recognizing the necessary social aspects of scientific knowledge leads to a serious shift in the analysis of science. Whereas until recently the study of scientific knowledge in terms of its social qualities began with its logical structure, today the primary focuses of analysis are the human brain, the material carrier of computer programs, the economic relations in the society of commodity production, and so forth. All of this is not science, but is involved in the production of new knowledge. The (...)
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  28. Historical Memory: The Construction of Consciousness.Alexander L. Nikiforov - 2017 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 55 (1):49-61.
    Historical memory is considered in this article as one of the most important pillars of national identity. In addition to identifying some of the characteristic features of national, historical memory, the author shows that historical memory is influenced by two factors—the direct experience of the witnesses and participants of past events and official propaganda. As the direct witnesses of events disappear, the possibility of reconstructing and distorting historical memory increases. The ideas put forth in this article are formulated based on (...)
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