Year:

  1.  12
    A Spinozistic Model of Moral Education.Johan Dahlbeck - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (5):533-550.
    Spinoza’s claim that self-preservation is the foundation of virtue makes for the point of departure of this philosophical investigation into what a Spinozistic model of moral education might look like. It is argued that Spinoza’s metaphysics places constraints on moral education insofar as an educational account would be affected by Spinoza’s denial of the objectivity of moral knowledge, his denial of the existence of free will, and of moral responsibility. This article discusses these challenges in some detail, seeking to construe (...)
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  2.  14
    Anarchism, Schooling, and Democratic Sensibility.David Kennedy - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (5):551-568.
    This paper seeks to address the question of schooling for democracy by, first, identifying at least one form of social character, dependent, after Marcuse, on the historical emergence of a “new sensibility.” It then explores one pedagogical thread related to the emergence of this form of subjectivity over the course of the last two centuries in the west, and traces its influence in the educational counter-tradition associated with philosophical anarchism, which is based on principles of dialogue and social reconstruction as (...)
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  3.  4
    The Problem of Bildung and the Basic Structure of Bildungstheorie.Thomas Rucker & Eric Dan Gerónimo - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (5):569-584.
    In this article, an attempt is made to introduce a systematization of the loosely connected group of authors called Bildungstheorie. This ought to not only be of significance for German-speaking educational science, for the concept of Bildung is also increasingly used internationally for the formulation and development of pedagogical issues. It is proposed that the concept of complexity could be suitable for bringing attention to common presuppositions in the theoretical dealing with the problem of Bildung. The thesis is that Bildung (...)
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  4.  9
    Civic Republicanism and Education: Democracy and Social Justice in School.Itay Snir & Yuval Eylon - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (5):585-600.
    The republican political tradition, which originated in Ancient Rome and picked up by several early-modern thinkers, has been revived in the last couple of decades following the seminal works of historian Quentin Skinner and political theorist Philip Pettit. Although educational questions do not normally occupy the center stage in republican theory, various theorists working within this framework have already highlighted the significance of education for any functioning republic. Looking at educational questions through the lens of freedom as non-domination has already (...)
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  5.  10
    New Techniques of Difference: On Data as School Pupils.Ernst D. Thoutenhoofd - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (5):517-532.
    Pupils—the learners of both educational thought and of educational practice—exist ever more as data, as do the strictures and goals through which these pupils are pedagogically managed. I elaborate this thought by way of a single example: a particular kind of pupils whose number is reportedly on the increase, namely pupils diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. In my analysis I combine Hacking’s nominalist conception of human kinds and Weber’s instrumental rationalism with recent thinking about the effects of digital technologies (...)
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  6.  19
    What Can Be Known and How People Grow: The Philosophical Stakes of the Assessment Debate.Rachel Wahl - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (5):499-515.
    Fierce debates over standardized assessments in teacher preparation have revolved around flaws in implementation and the politics of privatization. While important, this focus obscures the philosophical divide between proponents and opponents of standardized assessments. This article examines how faculty in New York State argue for and against a controversial performance assessment for teacher candidates, the edTPA. Revealing the distinctive ways that teacher educators on opposing sides of this debate understand the nature of knowledge, human development, professionalism, and social justice clarifies (...)
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  7.  1
    The Cartesian Heritage of Bloom’s Taxonomy.Brett Bertucio - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (4):477-497.
    This essay seeks to contribute to the critical reception of Bloom’s Taxonomy of Educational Objectives by tracing the Taxonomy’s underlying philosophical assumptions. Identifying Bloom’s work as consistent with the legacy of Cartesian thought, I argue that its hierarchy of behavioral objectives provides a framework for certainty and communicability in ascertaining student learning. However, its implicit rejection of intuitive knowledge as well as its antagonism between the human subject and the known object promote the Enlightenment ideal of education as “intellectual work.” (...)
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  8.  12
    The Eclipse of Imagination Within Educational ‘Official’ Framework and Why It Should Be Returned to Educational Discourse: A Deweyan Perspective.Vasco D’Agnese - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (4):443-462.
    In recent decades, the shift towards the “learnification” of educational discourse has de facto reframed educational purposes and schooling practice, thus reframing what students should know, strive for, and, in a sense, be. In this paper, given the efforts to disrupt the dominance of learning discourse, I seek to engage regarding a specific concern, namely, the progressive removal of imagination within educational official framework. Indeed, imagination has virtually disappeared from the documents, publications, web pages and recommendations of major educational agencies (...)
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  9.  8
    The ‘Crucified’ Leader: Cynicism, Fantasies and Paradoxes in Education.Dion Rüsselbæk Hansen & Lars Frode Frederiksen - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (4):425-441.
    In this paper we argue that transnational as well as national political demands and expectations on the educational field are contributing to produce four ideological-based educational leadership discourses in the literature. In order to conceptualize these discourses, we turn to the work of Schmidt and Zizek. On that basis we identify four dominant educational leadership discourses: a personhood-based discourse, a profession-based discourse, a standard-based discourse, and a resource-based discourse. These discourses have—as we will show—various consequences for the way we think (...)
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  10.  8
    Adorno: Cultural Education and Resistance.Sharon Jessop - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (4):409-423.
    In recent years, culture has become significantly politicized, or conspicuously de-politicized, in different parts of the UK, making its appearance in education policy of pivotal interest and ripe for critical attention. From the vantage point of Theodor Adorno’s work on the culture industry and his writings on the work of the teacher, I argue that cultural education is a site where something crucial and distinctive takes place. Within the Enlightenment tradition, critical self-reflection and resistance to heteronymous ways of thinking are (...)
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  11.  14
    From Human–Nature to Cultureplace in Education Via an Exploration of Unity and Relation in the Work of Peirce and Dewey.John Quay - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (4):463-476.
    In outdoor education discourse the notion of relation is often employed to convey basic connections between humanity and nature as human–nature relationships, yet the sense of relation itself is rarely questioned. Drawing on the work of Peirce and Dewey, I explore the ramifications of a more nuanced understanding of relation, specifically how relation works with and within differing senses of unity. These ramifications have consequences for how we understand human–nature relationships, which I argue are better conveyed in terms of culture–place. (...)
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  12.  9
    The Contribution of Non-Representational Theories in Education: Some Affective, Ethical and Political Implications.Michalinos Zembylas - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (4):393-407.
    This paper follows recent debates around theorizations of ‘affect’ and its distinction from ‘emotion’ in the context of non-representational theories to exemplify how the ontologization of affects creates important openings of ethical and political potential in educators’ efforts to make productive interventions in pedagogical spaces. The ontological orientation provided by NRT has two important implications for educational theory and practice. First, it exposes the indeterminacy and inventiveness of affective capacities of bodies, illustrating how diverse socio-materials events are variously enrolled in (...)
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  13.  7
    The Metabolic Core of Environmental Education.Ramsey Affifi - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (3):315-332.
    I consider the case of the “simplest” living beings—bacteria—and examine how their embodied activity constitutes an organism/environment interaction, out of which emerges the possibility of learning from an environment. I suggest that this mutual co-emergence of organism and environment implies a panbiotic educational interaction that is at once the condition for, and achievement of, all living beings. Learning and being learned from are entangled in varied ways throughout the biosphere. Education is not an exclusively human project, it is part of (...)
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  14.  3
    Introduction to Ecologizing Philosophy of Education.Ramsey Affifi, Sean Blenkinsop, Chloe Humphreys & Clarence W. Joldersma - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (3):229-241.
  15.  1
    David Corey and Plato’s Sophist.William H. F. Altman - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (3):371-372.
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  16. Shut-Up and Listen: Implications and Possibilities of Albert Memmi’s Characteristics of Colonization Upon the “Natural World”.Blenkinsop Sean, Affifi Ramsey, Piersol Laura & Sitka-Sage Michael De Danann - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (3):349-365.
    This paper begins by exploring the anti-colonial work of Tunisian scholar Albert Memmi in his classic book The Colonizer and the Colonized and determining whether the characteristics of colonization that he names can be successfully applied to the current relationship between modern humans and the “natural world”. After considering what we found to be the five key characteristics: manufacturing the colonial, alienation and unknowability, violence, psychological strategies, and language, history, and metaphor we draw clear parallels, through selected examples, to the (...)
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  17.  2
    Erratum To: Shut-Up and Listen: Implications and Possibilities of Albert Memmi’s Characteristics of Colonization Upon the “Natural World”.Sean Blenkinsop, Ramsey Affifi, Laura Piersol & Michael De Danann Sitka-Sage - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (3):367-367.
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  18.  6
    Environmental Consciousness, Sustainability, and the Character of Philosophy of Education.Michael Bonnett - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (3):333-347.
    This paper argues that education itself, properly understood, is intimately concerned with an individual’s being in the world, and therefore is ineluctably environmental. This is guaranteed by the ecstatic nature of consciousness. Furthermore, it is argued that a central dimension of this environment with which ecstatic human consciousness is engaged, is that of nature understood as the ‘self-arising’. Nature, so conceived, is essentially other and is epistemologically mysterious, possessing its own normativity, agency, and intrinsic value. As such, engagement with nature (...)
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  19.  8
    Reply to Critics of The Sophists in Plato’s Dialogues.David D. Corey - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (3):389-392.
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  20.  2
    Plato’s Euthydemus and Crito’s Failure to Hear.Samantha Deane - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (3):373-375.
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  21.  4
    White Paper Concerning Philosophy of Education and Environment.Chloe Humphreys & Sean Blenkinsop - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (3):243-264.
    This paper begins with a recognition that questions of climate change, environmental degradation, and our relations to the natural world are increasingly significant and requiring of a response not only as philosophers of education but also as citizens of the planet. As such the paper explores five of the key journals in philosophy of education in order to identify the extent, range, and content of current discussions related to the environment. It then organizes and summaries the articles that were located (...)
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  22.  2
    Learning to Live in the Anthropocene: Our Children and Ourselves.Laird Susan - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (3):265-282.
    This essay responds to recent philosophical interest in the Anthropocene by asking : Can and should educators adopt, form, transmit, teach ways of living to maintain, if not enhance Earth’s habitability, especially its habitability for diverse children? This inquiry therefore calls for conceptual study of learning to live through the Anthropocene—with, despite, after, before, amid, among, away from, and against its myriad harms, possible and actual, especially its harms to children. Examining cases of environmental racism in Checker’s Polluted Promises, and (...)
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  23.  3
    Renouncing Human Hubris and Reeducating Commonsense.Jane Roland Martin - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (3):283-298.
    The thesis of this paper is that we are now in the early stage of a revolution even more transformative than the Copernican. That great upheaval brought about a radical shift in the way men and women conceptualized their place in the universe. The revolution now under way entails a sea change in the way we think about ourselves in relation to the planet we inhabit—itself not a simple matter—and also the reeducation of our attitudes, values, feelings, emotions, patterns of (...)
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  24.  2
    Socrates and Protagoras on Political Rhetoric and Education.Marina McCoy - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (3):381-383.
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  25.  2
    Introduction.Avi I. Mintz - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (3):369-370.
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  26.  2
    Damon, Prodicus, and Socratic Matchmaking.Avi I. Mintz - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (3):377-379.
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  27.  5
    Taking the Sophists Seriously: Engaging David Corey’s The Sophists in Plato’s Dialogues.Anne-Marie Schultz - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (3):385-387.
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  28.  4
    Exploring William James’s Radical Empiricism and Relational Ontologies for Alternative Possibilities in Education.Barbara J. Thayer-Bacon - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (3):299-314.
    In A Pluralistic Universe, James argues that the world we experience is more than we can describe. Our theories are incomplete, open, and imperfect. Concepts function to try to shape, organize, and describe this open, flowing universe, while the universe continually escapes beyond our artificial boundaries. For James and myself, the universe is unfinished, a “primal stuff” or “pure experience.” However, James starts with parts and moves to wholes, and I want to start from wholes and move to parts and (...)
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  29.  11
    Education From a Biological Point of View.Stephen Boulter - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (2):167-182.
    There appears to be an irresolvable disagreement between “progressives” and “conservatives” regarding the ultimate aims of education. This paper argues that the dispute is irresolvable as it currently stands because the traditional progressive/conservative dichotomies are false and based on distorted half-truths. The current impasse is due to the fact that educationalists and philosophers alike have hitherto misunderstood the fundamental purpose of educational activities. The central claim of this paper is that a biological perspective on education allows one to see past (...)
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  30. Pedagogy and Politics, Confrontational Negotiations: A Response to Zhao.Derek R. Ford - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (2):225-227.
    In her review of my book, Weili Zhao sheds a new light on what it means to study like a communist, particularly by focusing on the concept of the encounter and the dao movement. In this response, I build on her insights by proposing that the binary and the planar be heterogeneously blocked together. Rather than critical pedagogy, critical education, liberal education, and postmodern education, we need to see pedagogy and politics as hanging together in a confrontational negotiation.
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  31.  10
    The Undergraduate Education Studies Dissertation: Philosophical Reflections Upon Tacit Empiricism in Textbook Guidance and the Latent Capacity of Argumentation.Howard Gibson & Darren Garside - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (2):115-130.
    The final-year undergraduate dissertation is commonplace in Education Studies programmes across the world and yet its philosophical assumptions are complex and not always questioned. In England there is evidence to suggest a tacit preference for empiricism in textbooks designed to support early researchers. This brings, we suggest, problems associated with dualism, instrumentalism and of accounting for value, redolent of the dilemmas that emerge from Hume’s empiricist epistemology. The paper suggests that if argumentation were explicitly taught to undergraduates it may help (...)
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  32.  10
    Should Children Have Best Friends?Mary Healy - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (2):183-195.
    An important theme in the philosophy of education community in recent years has been the way in which philosophy can be brought to illuminate and evaluate research findings from the landscape of policy and practice. Undoubtedly, some of these practices can be based on spurious evidence, yet have mostly been left unchallenged in both philosophical and educational circles. One of the newer practices creeping into schools is that of ‘No best friend’ policies. In some schools, this is interpreted as suggesting (...)
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  33.  16
    Pedagogical Personalism at Morehouse College.E. Jensen Kipton - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (2):147-165.
    This essay describes a visionary philosophy of education at Morehouse College. The educational process at Morehouse, construed here as a form of pedagogical personalism, is personified in three luminaries of Morehouse College: Benjamin Elijah Mays, Howard Washington Thurman, and Martin Luther King. The educational process at Morehouse should be interpreted as an ambivalent response to segregation and discrimination in Jim Crow America. Like all black institutions in the South, Morehouse was subject to racist constraints; Morehouse was created and existed in (...)
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  34.  27
    Transformative Learning, Enactivism, and Affectivity.Michelle Maiese - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (2):197-216.
    Education theorists have emphasized that transformative learning is not simply a matter of students gaining access to new knowledge and information, but instead centers upon personal transformation: it alters students’ perspectives, interpretations, and responses. How should learning that brings about this sort of self-transformation be understood from the perspectives of philosophy of mind and cognitive science? Jack Mezirow has described transformative learning primarily in terms of critical reflection, meta-cognitive reasoning, and the questioning of assumptions and beliefs. And within mainstream philosophy (...)
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  35.  11
    Transformative Critique: What Confucianism Can Contribute to Contemporary Education.Geir Sigurðsson - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (2):131-146.
    Critical thinking is currently much celebrated in the contemporary West and beyond, not least in higher education. Tertiary education students are generally expected to adopt a critical attitude in order to become responsible and constructive participants in the development of modern democratic society. Currently, the perceived desirability of critical thinking has even made it into a seemingly successful marketable commodity. A brief online search yields a vast number of books that are mostly presented as self-help manuals to enable readers to (...)
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  36.  5
    Review of Derek R. Ford, Communist Study: Education for the Commons. [REVIEW]Weili Zhao - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (2):217-223.
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  37.  9
    Review of Samuel D. Rocha, Folk Phenomenology: Education, Study, and the Human Person. [REVIEW]E. Lewis Tyson - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (1):107-111.
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  38.  6
    Choices or Rights? Charter Schools and the Politics of Choice-Based Education Policy Reform.Nicholas J. Eastman, Morgan Anderson & Deron Boyles - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (1):61-81.
    Simply put, charter schools have not lived up to their advocates’ promise of equity. Using examples of tangible civil rights gains of the twentieth century and extending feminist theories of invisible labor to include the labor of democracy, the authors argue that the charter movement renders invisible the labor that secured civil protections for historically marginalized groups. The charter movement hangs a quality public education—previously recognized as a universal guarantee—on the education consumer’s ability to navigate a marketplace. The authors conclude (...)
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  39.  14
    Why Historical Injustice Must Be Taught in Schools.Juan Espindola - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (1):95-106.
    In societies that have failed to confront past injustice, the most common justifications for the inclusion of history education within the school curriculum invoke the idea that those who cannot learn from the past are doomed to repeat it; or they appeal to goals such as reconciliation, or to the importance of recognizing and morally redressing the harm done to victims. These justifications are all sound and important. However, they must be supplemented with a justification of a different kind, one (...)
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  40.  4
    Neoliberal Education for Work Versus Liberal Education for Leisure.Kevin Gary - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (1):83-94.
    My concern in this essay is not so much with the invisible work or hidden labor produced by neoliberalism, but rather with what Joseph Pieper describes as an emerging culture of “total work”. More than the sheer number of hours of work, Pieper diagnoses a transformation in the way we view work. Work has become the exclusive point of reference for how we see and define ourselves. We are, Pieper feared, increasingly incapable of seeing beyond the working self. The human (...)
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  41.  8
    Reproducing the Motherboard: The Invisible Labor of Discourses That Gender Digital Fields.Heather Greenhalgh-Spencer - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (1):33-48.
    Within the digital workforce, women are disappearing. While there are many factors that could be ‘blamed’ for this phenomenon, this article takes issue with the sexist and patriarchal discourses that are deployed within the digital workforce. In many ways, sexist discourses are taken for granted within the digital workplace; and in that way, the discourses themselves are rendered invisible through a lack of concerted uncovering of the ways that these sexist discourses produce—and reproduce—women as sexual objects and outsiders in this (...)
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  42.  8
    Reply to Lewis: Must Poetry Be Poetic?Samuel D. Rocha - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (1):113-114.
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  43.  5
    Cassandra in the Classroom: Teaching and Moral Madness.Doris A. Santoro - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (1):49-60.
    Moral madness is a symptom of the moral violence experienced by teachers who are expected to exercise responsibility for their students and their work, but whose moral voice is misrecognized as self-interest and whose moral agency is suppressed. I conduct a feminist ethical analysis of the figure of Cassandra to examine the ways in which teachers may be driven to moral madness.
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  44.  7
    Parental Involvement and Public Schools: Disappearing Mothers in Labor and Politics.Amy Shuffelton - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (1):21-32.
    In this article, I argue that the material and rhetorical connection between “parental involvement” and motherhood has the effect of making two important features of parental involvement disappear. Both of these features need to be taken into account to think through the positive and negative effects of parental involvement in public schooling. First, parental involvement is labor. In the following section of this paper, I discuss the work of feminist scholars who have brought this to light. Second, parental involvement remains (...)
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  45.  4
    Disappearing Goods: Invisible Labor and Unseen Production in Education.Amy Shuffelton & Jessica Hochman - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (1):1-5.
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  46.  15
    Education for Jobless Society.Alexander M. Sidorkin - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (1):7-20.
    The advent of societies with low employment rates will present a challenge to education. Education must move away from the discourse of skills and towards the discourse of meaning and motivation. The paper considers three kinds of non-waged optional labor that may form the basis of the future economy: prosumption, volunteering, and self-design. All three require the ability of a worker to make meaning of his or her own life.
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