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  1.  11
    Education From a Biological Point of View.Stephen Boulter - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (2):167-182.
    There appears to be an irresolvable disagreement between “progressives” and “conservatives” regarding the ultimate aims of education. This paper argues that the dispute is irresolvable as it currently stands because the traditional progressive/conservative dichotomies are false and based on distorted half-truths. The current impasse is due to the fact that educationalists and philosophers alike have hitherto misunderstood the fundamental purpose of educational activities. The central claim of this paper is that a biological perspective on education allows one to see past (...)
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  2. Pedagogy and Politics, Confrontational Negotiations: A Response to Zhao.Derek R. Ford - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (2):225-227.
    In her review of my book, Weili Zhao sheds a new light on what it means to study like a communist, particularly by focusing on the concept of the encounter and the dao movement. In this response, I build on her insights by proposing that the binary and the planar be heterogeneously blocked together. Rather than critical pedagogy, critical education, liberal education, and postmodern education, we need to see pedagogy and politics as hanging together in a confrontational negotiation.
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  3.  10
    The Undergraduate Education Studies Dissertation: Philosophical Reflections Upon Tacit Empiricism in Textbook Guidance and the Latent Capacity of Argumentation.Howard Gibson & Darren Garside - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (2):115-130.
    The final-year undergraduate dissertation is commonplace in Education Studies programmes across the world and yet its philosophical assumptions are complex and not always questioned. In England there is evidence to suggest a tacit preference for empiricism in textbooks designed to support early researchers. This brings, we suggest, problems associated with dualism, instrumentalism and of accounting for value, redolent of the dilemmas that emerge from Hume’s empiricist epistemology. The paper suggests that if argumentation were explicitly taught to undergraduates it may help (...)
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  4.  10
    Should Children Have Best Friends?Mary Healy - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (2):183-195.
    An important theme in the philosophy of education community in recent years has been the way in which philosophy can be brought to illuminate and evaluate research findings from the landscape of policy and practice. Undoubtedly, some of these practices can be based on spurious evidence, yet have mostly been left unchallenged in both philosophical and educational circles. One of the newer practices creeping into schools is that of ‘No best friend’ policies. In some schools, this is interpreted as suggesting (...)
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  5.  14
    Pedagogical Personalism at Morehouse College.E. Jensen Kipton - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (2):147-165.
    This essay describes a visionary philosophy of education at Morehouse College. The educational process at Morehouse, construed here as a form of pedagogical personalism, is personified in three luminaries of Morehouse College: Benjamin Elijah Mays, Howard Washington Thurman, and Martin Luther King. The educational process at Morehouse should be interpreted as an ambivalent response to segregation and discrimination in Jim Crow America. Like all black institutions in the South, Morehouse was subject to racist constraints; Morehouse was created and existed in (...)
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  6.  22
    Transformative Learning, Enactivism, and Affectivity.Michelle Maiese - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (2):197-216.
    Education theorists have emphasized that transformative learning is not simply a matter of students gaining access to new knowledge and information, but instead centers upon personal transformation: it alters students’ perspectives, interpretations, and responses. How should learning that brings about this sort of self-transformation be understood from the perspectives of philosophy of mind and cognitive science? Jack Mezirow has described transformative learning primarily in terms of critical reflection, meta-cognitive reasoning, and the questioning of assumptions and beliefs. And within mainstream philosophy (...)
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  7.  11
    Transformative Critique: What Confucianism Can Contribute to Contemporary Education.Geir Sigurðsson - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (2):131-146.
    Critical thinking is currently much celebrated in the contemporary West and beyond, not least in higher education. Tertiary education students are generally expected to adopt a critical attitude in order to become responsible and constructive participants in the development of modern democratic society. Currently, the perceived desirability of critical thinking has even made it into a seemingly successful marketable commodity. A brief online search yields a vast number of books that are mostly presented as self-help manuals to enable readers to (...)
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  8.  4
    Review of Derek R. Ford, Communist Study: Education for the Commons. [REVIEW]Weili Zhao - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (2):217-223.
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  9.  9
    Review of Samuel D. Rocha, Folk Phenomenology: Education, Study, and the Human Person. [REVIEW]E. Lewis Tyson - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (1):107-111.
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  10.  6
    Choices or Rights? Charter Schools and the Politics of Choice-Based Education Policy Reform.Nicholas J. Eastman, Morgan Anderson & Deron Boyles - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (1):61-81.
    Simply put, charter schools have not lived up to their advocates’ promise of equity. Using examples of tangible civil rights gains of the twentieth century and extending feminist theories of invisible labor to include the labor of democracy, the authors argue that the charter movement renders invisible the labor that secured civil protections for historically marginalized groups. The charter movement hangs a quality public education—previously recognized as a universal guarantee—on the education consumer’s ability to navigate a marketplace. The authors conclude (...)
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  11.  9
    Why Historical Injustice Must Be Taught in Schools.Juan Espindola - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (1):95-106.
    In societies that have failed to confront past injustice, the most common justifications for the inclusion of history education within the school curriculum invoke the idea that those who cannot learn from the past are doomed to repeat it; or they appeal to goals such as reconciliation, or to the importance of recognizing and morally redressing the harm done to victims. These justifications are all sound and important. However, they must be supplemented with a justification of a different kind, one (...)
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  12.  4
    Neoliberal Education for Work Versus Liberal Education for Leisure.Kevin Gary - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (1):83-94.
    My concern in this essay is not so much with the invisible work or hidden labor produced by neoliberalism, but rather with what Joseph Pieper describes as an emerging culture of “total work”. More than the sheer number of hours of work, Pieper diagnoses a transformation in the way we view work. Work has become the exclusive point of reference for how we see and define ourselves. We are, Pieper feared, increasingly incapable of seeing beyond the working self. The human (...)
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  13.  7
    Reproducing the Motherboard: The Invisible Labor of Discourses That Gender Digital Fields.Heather Greenhalgh-Spencer - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (1):33-48.
    Within the digital workforce, women are disappearing. While there are many factors that could be ‘blamed’ for this phenomenon, this article takes issue with the sexist and patriarchal discourses that are deployed within the digital workforce. In many ways, sexist discourses are taken for granted within the digital workplace; and in that way, the discourses themselves are rendered invisible through a lack of concerted uncovering of the ways that these sexist discourses produce—and reproduce—women as sexual objects and outsiders in this (...)
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  14.  8
    Reply to Lewis: Must Poetry Be Poetic?Samuel D. Rocha - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (1):113-114.
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  15.  5
    Cassandra in the Classroom: Teaching and Moral Madness.Doris A. Santoro - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (1):49-60.
    Moral madness is a symptom of the moral violence experienced by teachers who are expected to exercise responsibility for their students and their work, but whose moral voice is misrecognized as self-interest and whose moral agency is suppressed. I conduct a feminist ethical analysis of the figure of Cassandra to examine the ways in which teachers may be driven to moral madness.
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  16.  7
    Parental Involvement and Public Schools: Disappearing Mothers in Labor and Politics.Amy Shuffelton - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (1):21-32.
    In this article, I argue that the material and rhetorical connection between “parental involvement” and motherhood has the effect of making two important features of parental involvement disappear. Both of these features need to be taken into account to think through the positive and negative effects of parental involvement in public schooling. First, parental involvement is labor. In the following section of this paper, I discuss the work of feminist scholars who have brought this to light. Second, parental involvement remains (...)
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  17.  4
    Disappearing Goods: Invisible Labor and Unseen Production in Education.Amy Shuffelton & Jessica Hochman - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (1):1-5.
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  18.  11
    Education for Jobless Society.Alexander M. Sidorkin - 2017 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 36 (1):7-20.
    The advent of societies with low employment rates will present a challenge to education. Education must move away from the discourse of skills and towards the discourse of meaning and motivation. The paper considers three kinds of non-waged optional labor that may form the basis of the future economy: prosumption, volunteering, and self-design. All three require the ability of a worker to make meaning of his or her own life.
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