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  1.  1
    Augustus, Tiberius, and the End of the Roman Triumph.Harriet Flower - 2020 - Classical Antiquity 39 (1):1-28.
    The triumph was the most prestigious accolade a politician and general could receive in republican Rome. After a brief review of the role played by the triumph in republican political culture, this article analyzes the severe limits Augustus placed on triumphal parades after 19 BC, which then became very rare celebrations. It is argued that Augustus aimed at and almost succeeded in eliminating traditional triumphal celebrations completely during his lifetime, by using a combination of refusing them for himself and his (...)
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  2.  1
    Relationality, Fidelity, and the Event in Sappho.Andres Matlock - 2020 - Classical Antiquity 39 (1):29-56.
    This article considers the conceptual significance of relationality in Sappho. It argues that Sappho's poetry reconstitutes systems of relation by making evident exceptions to their explanatory capacity. These exceptions can be profitably understood through the rubric of the “event.” Drawing in particular on the relational function of prepositions and Alain Badiou's philosophical work on the event, the article examines how “thinking prepositionally” alongside Sappho reveals both the relations that make up the situational world of her poetry as well as those (...)
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  3. Journeys Into Slavery Along the Black Sea Coast, C. 550-450 BCE.Christopher Stedman Parmenter - 2020 - Classical Antiquity 39 (1):57-94.
    This article argues that descriptions of the Black Sea found in the Archaic poets, Herodotus, and later geographers were influenced by commercial itineraries circulated amongst Greek slave traders in the north. Drawing on an epigraphic corpus of twenty-three merchant letters from the region dating between c. 550 and 450 BCE, I contrast the travels of enslaved persons recorded in the documents with stylized descriptions found in literary accounts. This article finds that slaves took a variety of routes into—and out of—slavery, (...)
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  4. Theban Myth in Virgil's Aeneid: The Brothers at War.Stefano Rebeggiani - 2020 - Classical Antiquity 39 (1):95-125.
    This article offers a thorough study of Virgil's interaction with the myth of Eteocles and Polynices' war for the throne of Thebes, as represented especially in Athenian tragedy. It demonstrates that allusions to the Theban myth are crucial to the Aeneid's construction of a set of tensions and oppositions that play an important role in Virgil's reflection on the historical experience of Rome, especially in connection with the transition from Republic to Empire. In particular, interaction with Theban stories allows Virgil (...)
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  5.  5
    The Sleep of Reason: Sleep and the Philosophical Soul in Ancient Greece.Victoria Wohl - 2020 - Classical Antiquity 39 (1):126-151.
    Freud tracked the psyche along the paths of sleep, following the “royal road” of dreams. For the ancient Greeks, too, the psyche was revealed in sleep, not through the semiotics of dreams but through the peculiar state of being we occupy while asleep. As a “borderland between living and not living”, sleep offered unique access to the psukhē, that element within the self unassimilable to waking consciousness. This paper examines how Greek philosophers theorized the sleep state and the somnolent psukhē, (...)
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