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  1.  2
    Leave Only Footprints? Reframing Climate Change, Environmental Stewardship, and Human Impact.Aufrecht Monica - 2017 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 20 (1):84-102.
    Cheryl Hall has argued that framing of climate change must acknowledge the sacrifices needed to reach a sustainable future. This paper builds on that argument. Although it is important to acknowledge the value of what must be sacrificed, this paper argues that current frames about the environment falsely portray humans and the environment as in a zero-sum game, and in doing so ask people to give up the wrong things. This could undermine the public’s trust in environmentalism, and might even (...)
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  2.  1
    The Ontology of Species: Commentary on Kasperbauer’s ‘Should We Bring Back the Passenger Pigeon? The Ethics of De-Extinction’.Jonathan Beever - 2017 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 20 (1):18-20.
    Beneath important ethical questions about the impacts of de-extinct species on ecosystems and the potential harms to individual organisms lies a more fundamental assumption; namely, that the thing being "de-extinct-ed" is indeed a member of previously existing species. This is the ontological assumption: that genetic make-up of the individual is both a necessary and sufficient condition for species membership. Questioning this ontological assumption poses an even more critical challenge for de-extinction. Genes a member of a species do not make. They (...)
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  3.  1
    De-Extinction and Deep Questions About Species Conservation.Christian Diehm - 2017 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 20 (1):25-28.
    T. J. Kasperbauer presents an analysis of the ethics of de-extinction that is fairly distinctive in its focus on the welfare of individual animals. But while he is right to express concerns about individual animal well-being, individualism may not be the most important lens through which to view this issue. If one examines more closely what is at issue in de-extinction technologies in relation to species, additional problems appear that cast doubt both on the legitimacy of de-extinction projects, and on (...)
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  4.  1
    Being a Friend to Nature: Environmental Virtues and Ethical Ideals.Bryan E. Bannon - 2017 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 20 (1):44-58.
    This paper argues that environmental virtue ethics requires the adoption of an ethical ideal in order to guide the identification and practice of virtues. I recommend friendship as one such ideal due to emphasis such an ideal places upon the quality of the relationship with nature rather than the evaluation of individual actions. After describing the value of friendship as an ethical ideal, I respond to some of the objections that have been raised against it in the context of environmental (...)
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  5.  2
    We Can’T Bring Back the Passenger Pigeon: The Ethics of Deception Around De-Extinction.David E. Blockstein - 2017 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 20 (1):33-37.
    There is much hype around the idea of bringing the Passenger Pigeon back from extinction. However, ‘de-extinction’ is a fantasy that is not grounded in science. The proposed plans for ‘de-extinction’ would create a new organism that is not likely to be viable in the wild. Thus, ‘de-extinction’ as proposed is unethical both because it could lead into the release in nature of a new genetically created organism and because it is not honest to claim that it would reverse the (...)
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  6.  4
    What’s the Harm in Climate Change?Eric S. Godoy - 2017 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 20 (1):103-117.
    A popular argument against direct duties for individuals to address climate change holds that only states and other powerful collective agents must act. It excuses individual actions as harmless since they are neither necessary nor sufficient to cause harm, arise through normal activity, and have no clear victims. Philosophers have challenged one or more of these assumptions; however, I show that this definition of harm also excuses states and other collective agents. I cite two examples of this in public discourse (...)
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  7. Integral Value and The Virtue of Hospitality: A Response to Kasperbauer.Paul Haught - 2017 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 20 (1):29-32.
    In this response, I unpack the implications of Kasperbauer’s focus on the passenger pigeon in his critique of de-extinction. While I accept his sentientist objections to de-extinction, I consider how a case for de-extinction can be developed using Ronald Sandler’s concept of integral value. In this vein, justification for bringing back the passenger pigeon is comparable to that supporting a recovery effort of an endangered species. However, as with a recovery plan, and possibly more so, de-extinction must reflect a sincere (...)
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  8.  13
    Environmental Ethics for the Long Term: An Introduction. [REVIEW]Trevor Hedberg - 2017 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 20 (1):121-124.
    In this book review, I assess the merits of John Nolt's Environmental Ethics for the Long Term: An Introduction. Although the book is written as a primary text for an environmental ethics course, some of its later chapters are clearly written more for academic philosophers than undergraduate students. As a textbook, Nolt's book is excellent and an ideal choice for those who want to emphasize the long-term impacts of various environmental problems (e.g., climate change, biodiversity loss) in their courses. Regarding (...)
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  9. Environmental Philosophy in Asian Traditions of Thought. [REVIEW]Matthew A. Izor - 2017 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 20 (1):118-121.
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  10.  1
    Should We Bring Back the Passenger Pigeon? The Ethics of De-Extinction.T. J. Kasperbauer - 2017 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 20 (1):1-14.
    Recent advances in synthetic biology have made it possible to revive extinct species of animals, a process known as ‘de-extinction’. This paper examines two reasons for supporting de-extinction: the potential for de-extinct species to play useful roles in ecosystems; and human valuing of certain de-extinct species. I focus on the particular case of passenger pigeons to argue that the most critical challenge for de-extinction is that it entails significant suffering for sentient individual animals. I also provide reasons to take existence (...)
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  11.  2
    Using De-Extinction to Create Extinct Species Proxies; Natural History Not Included.Patrice Kohl - 2017 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 20 (1):15-17.
    Authors sometimes treat the promise of de-extinction as a forgone conclusion. But if we take Kasperbauer’s approach and assess the moral acceptability of de-extinction by weighting benefits to species against the suffering of individuals, the promise of de-extinction deserves greater critical attention. Accepting de-extinct individuals as replacements for extinct predecessors assumes species are separate from environment and can be reduced to DNA. In this response to Kasperbauer’s essay, I examine how the acceptability of de-extinction might shift if we instead view (...)
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  12. Shari’Ah Perspective on Green Jobs and Environmental Ethics.Mehdi Shabannia Mansour, Kamal Halili Hassan & Parviz Bagheri - 2017 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 20 (1):59-77.
    The concept of green jobs emerged in 2007 as a means for conserving energy, minimizing natural gas emissions, reducing pollution and waste and protecting and improving ecosystems. The practice of decent employment through such jobs has caught on significantly and shown much positive effects. Decent work refers to employment opportunities that provide for fair income, security, improving personal and social development and promoting equality. Combining green job and decent work as a new approach can alter the traditional perspective of labour (...)
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  13.  1
    What is the Point of Thinking of New Technologies as Social Experiments?Martin Peterson - 2017 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 20 (1):78-83.
    In this paper I respond to van de Poel’s claim that new technologies should be conceived as ongoing social experiments, which is an idea originally introduced by Schinzinger and Martin in the 1970s. I discuss and criticize three possible motivations for thinking of new technologies as ongoing social experiments.
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  14. De-Extinction and the Flourishing of Species.Ian A. Smith - 2017 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 20 (1):38-40.
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  15. Biases in the Selection of Candidate Species for De-Extinction.Derek D. Turner - 2017 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 20 (1):21-24.
    Entrenched biases in favour of large, charismatic mammals, towards predators, towards terrestrial animals and towards species that have cultural importance can influence the selection of candidate species for de-extinction research. Often, the species with the highest existence value will also be the ones that raise the most serious animal welfare concerns.
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  16.  3
    How Much Is That Mammoth in the Window?Jennifer Welchman - 2017 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 20 (1):41-43.
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