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  1.  2
    Intellectual Property Rights and Global Climate Change: Toward Resolving an Apparent Dilemma.Justin B. Biddle - 2016 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (3):301-319.
    This paper addresses an apparent dilemma that must be resolved in order to respond ethically to global climate change. The dilemma can be presented as follows. Responding ethically to global climate change requires technological innovation that is accessible to everyone, including inhabitants of the least developed countries. Technological innovation, according to many, requires strong intellectual property protection, but strong intellectual property protection makes it highly unlikely that patent-protected technologies will be accessible to developing countries at affordable prices. Given this, responding (...)
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  2.  3
    Attributing Weather Extremes to Climate Change and the Future of Adaptation Policy.Idil Boran & Joseph Heath - 2016 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (3):239-255.
    Until recently, climate scientists were unable to link the occurrence of extreme weather events to anthropogenic climate change. In recent years, however, climate science has made considerable advancements, making it possible to assess the influence of anthropogenic climate change on single weather events. Using a new technique called ‘probabilistic event attribution’, scientists are able to assess whether anthropogenic climate change has changed the likelihood of the occurrence of a recorded extreme weather event. These advancements raise the expectation that this branch (...)
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  3.  2
    An Anti-Commodification Defense of Veganism.Patrick Clipsham & Katy Fulfer - 2016 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (3):285-300.
    We develop an anti-commodification defense of ethical veganism which holds that common defenses of ethical veganism can benefit from treating the commodification of non-human animals as a serious, distinct moral wrong. Drawing inspiration from Elizabeth Anderson’s account of commodification, we develop an account of commodification that identifies most uses of animals in developed countries as forms of problematic commodification. We then show that this position can make significant contributions to both welfarist defenses of ethical veganism and animal rights theories.
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  4.  3
    Climate Change and the Moral Agent: Individual Duties in an Interdependent World. [REVIEW]Corey Katz - 2016 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (3):366-369.
  5.  1
    Reframing Climate Justice: A Three-Dimensional View on Just Climate Negotiations.Teea Kortetmäki - 2016 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (3):320-334.
    This article proposes reframing the justice discourse in climate negotiations. In so doing, it makes two claims. First, global climate negotiations deserve to be addressed as an issue of justice on their own due to their peculiar characteristics. Second, a multidimensional theory of justice is superior to distributional theories for this task. To support these arguments, I apply the multidimensional theory of justice to global climate negotiations. This analysis reveals that injustice in the negotiations is multidimensional and irreducible to distributional (...)
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  6.  3
    The Absurdity of Economists’ Sacrifice-Free Solutions to Climate Change.Rob Lawlor - 2016 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (3):350-365.
    John Broome and Duncan Foley have argued that it is a ‘misperception’ that the ‘control of global warming is costly’ and that we can make ‘sacrifices unnecessary’. There are a number of assumptions that are essential for this idea to work. These assumptions can be challenged. Furthermore, my claim is not merely that the Broome/Foley argument is flawed, and therefore unlikely to be successful. I will argue that it is potentially harmful, leading to harms for the present generation and for (...)
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  7.  5
    Climate Sins of Our Fathers? Historical Accountability in Distributing Emissions Rights.David R. Morrow - 2016 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (3):335-349.
    One major question in climate justice is whether developed countries’ historical emissions are relevant to distributing the burdens of mitigating climate change. To argue that developed countries should bear a greater share of the burdens of mitigation because of their past emissions is to advocate ‘historical accountability.’ Standard arguments for historical accountability rely on corrective justice. These arguments face important objections. By using the notion of a global emissions budget, however, we can reframe the debate over historical accountability in terms (...)
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  8.  2
    International Environmental “Soft Law”: The Functions and Limits of Nobinding Instruments in International Environmental Governance and Law. [REVIEW]Diana Soeiro - 2016 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (3):369-371.
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  9.  1
    Metaphors in Invasion Biology: Implications for Risk Assessment and Management of Non-Native Species.N. H. Verbrugge Laura, S. E. W. Leuven Rob & A. E. Zwart Hub - 2016 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (3):273-284.
    Metaphors for describing the introduction, impacts, and management of non-native species are numerous and often quite outspoken. Policy-makers have adopted increasingly disputed metaphorical terms from scientific discourse. We performed a critical analysis of the use of strong metaphors in reporting scientific findings to policy-makers. Our analysis shows that perceptions of harm, invasiveness or nativeness are dynamic and inevitably display multiple narratives in science, policy or management. Improving our awareness of multiple expert and stakeholder narratives that exist in the context of (...)
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  10. Climate Neutrality – Towards An Ethical Conception of Climate Neutrality.Rafael Ziegler - 2016 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (3):256-272.
    Over the last decade, climate neutrality has emerged as an empowering, new concept—and it has given rise to concerns that it may be conducive to greenwashing and a disregard for justice and sustainability. Are these concerns justified? This paper argues that there is a qualified case for climate neutrality as part of an integrated approach to climate ethics. There are ethical and economic arguments for climate neutrality. An ethical conception of climate neutrality puts critical emphasis on reduction as well as (...)
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  11.  7
    Reply to My Critics: Justifying the Fair Share Argument.Christian Baatz - 2016 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (2):160-169.
    In an earlier article I argued that individuals are obligated not to exceed their fair share of emissions entitlements, that many exceed their fair share at present and thus ought to reduce their emissions as far as can reasonably be demanded. The peer commentators raised various insightful and pressing concerns, but the following objections seem particularly important: It was argued that the fair share argument is insufficiently justified, that it is incoherent, that it would result in more far-reaching duties than (...)
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  12.  2
    Total Liberation: The Power and Promise of Animal Rights and the Radical Earth Movement.Natalie Blanton - 2016 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (2):231-233.
  13.  7
    Environmental Skill: Motivation, Knowledge, and the Possibility of a Non-Romantic Environmental Ethics.Carol Booth - 2016 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (2):235-237.
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  14.  17
    How Not to Save the Planet.Thom Brooks - 2016 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (2):119-135.
    Climate change presents us with perhaps the most pressing challenge today. But is it a problem we can solve? This article argues that existing conservationist and adaptation approaches fail to satisfy their objectives. A second issue that these approaches disagree about how best to end climate change, but accept that it is a problem that can be solved. I believe this view is mistaken: a future environmental catastrophe is an event we might at best postpone, but not avoid. This raises (...)
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  15.  4
    Environmental Ethics: From Theory to Practice.Francesco Carpanini - 2016 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (2):233-235.
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  16.  23
    Deriving Moral Considerability From Leopold’s A Sand County Almanac.Ben Dixon - 2016 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (2):196-212.
    I argue that a reasonable understanding of Leopold’s ‘Land Ethic’ is one that identifies possession of health as being a sufficient condition for moral consideration. With this, Leopold extends morality not only to biotic wholes, but to individual organisms, as both can have their health undermined. My argument centers on explaining why Leopold thinks it reasonable to analogize ecosystems both to an organism and to a community: both have a health. My conclusions undermine J. Baird Callicott’s rhetorical dismissal of the (...)
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  17. Is It Possible to Care for Ecosystems? Policy Paralysis and Ecosystem Management.Robert K. Garcia & Jonathan A. Newman - 2016 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (2):170-182.
    Conservationists have two types of arguments for why we should conserve ecosystems: instrumental and intrinsic value arguments. Instrumental arguments contend that we ought to conserve ecosystems because of the benefits that humans, or other morally relevant individuals, derive from ecosystems. Conservationists are often loath to rely too heavily on the instrumental argument because it could potentially force them to admit that some ecosystems are not at all useful to humans, or that if they are, they are not more useful than (...)
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  18.  4
    Time Frames for Saving the Planet.Andrew Jameton - 2016 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (2):136-140.
  19.  3
    Two Problems of Climate Ethics: Can We Lose the Planet but Save Ourselves?Alexander Lee & Jordan Kincaid - 2016 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (2):141-144.
  20.  4
    Environmental Justice as a Foundation for a Process-Based Framework for Adaptation and Mitigation: A Commentary on Brooks.Clement Loo - 2016 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (2):145-149.
    Brooks convincingly makes the case that the current arguments for climate mitigation and adaptation fail. Each of the arguments discussed by Brooks appeals to end-state solutions that are some combination of poorly defined, inadequate, inappropriate, or are impossible. Thus, those arguments provide us with relatively limited guidance regarding what we should do about climate change. I hope to extend Brooks’ article by providing a rough sketch of how we might think about responding to climate change that does not depend upon (...)
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  21.  2
    Change-Oriented Conceptions of Climate: A Response to Thom Brooks’ How Not to Save the Planet.Ben Mylius - 2016 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (2):150-152.
  22.  2
    The Precautionary Principle: A Preferred Approach for the Unknown.Eoin O’Neill - 2016 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (2):153-156.
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  23.  3
    On Staying Focused: Response to Thom Brooks’ How Not To Save the Planet.Jonathan Peter Schwartz - 2016 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (2):157-159.
  24.  4
    Treading Lightly on the Climate in a Problem-Ridden World.Dan C. Shahar - 2016 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (2):183-195.
    Personal carbon footprints have become a subject of major concern among those who worry about global climate change. Conventional wisdom holds that individuals have a duty to reduce their impacts on the climate system by restricting their carbon footprints. However, I defend a new argument for thinking that this conventional wisdom is mistaken. Individuals, I argue, have a duty to take actions to combat the world’s problems. But since climate change is only one of a nearly endless list of such (...)
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  25.  5
    Reversibility and Nuclear Energy Production Technologies: A Framework and Three Cases.Jan Peter Bergen - 2016 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (1):37-59.
    Recent events have put the acceptability of the risks of nuclear energy production technologies under the spotlight. A focus on risks, however, could lead to the neglect of other aspects of NEPT, such as their irreversibility. I argue that awareness of the socio-historical development of NEPT is helpful for understanding their irreversibility. To this end, I conceptualize NEPT development as a process of structuration in which material, institutional and discursive elements are produced and/or reproduced by purposive social actors. This conceptualization (...)
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  26.  15
    Review of Darrel Moellendorf, The Moral Challenge of Dangerous Climate Change: Values, Poverty, and Policy.Brian Berkey - 2016 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (1):108-111.
  27.  4
    Emissions Trading Ethics.Jo Dirix, Wouter Peeters & Sigrid Sterckx - 2016 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (1):60-75.
    Although emissions trading is embraced as a means to curb carbon emissions and to incentivize the use of renewable energy, it is also heavily contested on ethical grounds. We will assess the main fundamental objections and possible counterarguments. Although we sympathize with some of these arguments, we argue that they are unpersuasive when an emissions trading system is well designed: emissions should be accounted ‘upstream,’ on the production rather than the consumer level. Moreover, allowances should be auctioned, and regulatory measures (...)
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  28.  8
    Climate Justice: Vulnerability and Protection.J. Paul Kelleher - 2016 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (1):111-114.
  29.  2
    Resilience as a Political Ideal.Avery Kolers - 2016 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (1):91-107.
    “Resilience” is booming. No longer a mere metaphor or abstract reference to dispositional properties, the resilience of communities or social-ecological systems is increasingly grounded in specific first-order properties. Consequently, resilience now constitutes a contentful and achievable partial conception of a good society. Yet political philosophers have taken little notice. The current article first discerns within recent social-scientific literature a set of attainable and measurable first-order properties that constitute “community resilience” or “ecological resilience.” Then, specifying “resilience” as the resilience of high-HDI (...)
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  30.  6
    Forced Environmental Migration: Ethical Considerations for Emerging Migration Policy.Nicole Marshall - 2016 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (1):1-18.
    This paper gives a normative assessment of the problem of forced environmental migration, or, migration driven primarily by environmental events, drawing particular attention to the framing of citizen and non-citizen rights in the context of anthropogenic climate change. It explores a moral imperative to install special migration rights for Environmentally Displaced Peoples and briefly assesses the ability of current domestic migration policy to offer such rights. The paper concludes by offering three theoretical policy-oriented exercises, ultimately locating tiered citizenship as the (...)
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  31.  2
    Stakeholder Participation as a Means to Produce Morally Justified Environmental Decisions.Lars Samuelsson & Lucy Rist - 2016 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (1):76-90.
    Stakeholder participation is an increasingly popular ingredient within environmental management and decision-making. While much has been written about its purported benefits, a question that has been largely neglected is whether decision-making informed through stakeholder participation is actually likely to yield decisions that are morally justified in their own right. Using moral methodology as a starting point, we argue that stakeholder participation in environmental decision-making may indeed be an appropriate means to produce morally justified decisions, the reason being that such participation (...)
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  32.  4
    Thinking Like a Mall: Environmental Philosophy After the End of Nature.Thomas S. J. Smith - 2016 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (1):114-117.
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  33.  3
    Citizens, Leaders and the Common Good in a World of Necessity and Scarcity: Machiavelli’s Lessons for Community-Based Natural Resource Management.Kristof Van Assche, Raoul Beunen & Martijn Duineveld - 2016 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (1):19-36.
    In this article we investigate the value and utility of Machiavelli’s work for Community-Based Natural Resource Management. We made a selection of five topics derived from literature on NRM and CBNRM: Law and Policy, Justice, Participation, Transparency, and Leadership and management. We use Machiavelli’s work to analyze these topics and embed the results in a narrative intended to lead into the final conclusions, where the overarching theme of natural resource management for the common good is considered. Machiavelli’s focus on practical (...)
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