Year:

  1. The Governance of Solar Geoengineering: Managing Climate Change in the Anthropocene: By Jesse Reynolds, New York, NY, Cambridge University Press, 2019, Viii + 267 Pp., $89.99 (Hardback), $34.99 (Paperback), $28.00 (eBook), ISBN 9781107161955. [REVIEW]Marion Hourdequin - 2022 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 25 (1):76-79.
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  2.  6
    Looking Forward and Backward at Extreme Event Attribution in Climate Policy.Greg Lusk - 2022 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 25 (1):37-51.
    ABSTRACT How the science of probabilistic extreme event attribution might inform climate change adaptation is hotly debated. Central to these debates is an understanding that event attribution’s backward-looking orientation aligns poorly with the forward-facing goals of adaptation policy. Here, I analyze two new philosophical arguments that challenge this understanding and claim that probabilistic event attribution is not only forward-looking, but has a potentially significant role in risk-pooling adaptive strategies. I argue the purported forward-looking capabilities of event attribution are based on (...)
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  3.  6
    ‘Interconnectedness with Nature’: The Imperative for an African-Centered Eco-Philosophy in Forest Resource Conservation in Nigeria.Mercy Osemudiame Okpoko - 2022 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 25 (1):21-36.
    ABSTRACT Calls for society to reconnect with nature are commonplace in environmental discourse. The expression ‘Interconnectedness with Nature’ has a place in African eco-philosophy. The departure from this African eco-philosophy may be a potential contributor to present rate of forest depletion in Nigeria. By employing the African eco-philosophy of ‘interconnectedness with nature’, this study considers its capacity to demonstrate the relevance of African socio-ecological ethics for forest conservation. There is need for such values to form the theoretical foundation of environmental (...)
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  4.  4
    What Peterson Gets Wrong About Truman and The Bomb.John C. O’Day - 2022 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 25 (1):69-75.
    ABSTRACT Martin B. Peterson argues that the social experiment analysis improperly shifts our focus onto the rhetorical dimension of debates over technology, which is ‘clearly irrelevant’ to the ‘traditional’ question: is this a morally acceptable technology? By invoking Harry Truman and the atom bomb in his counterargument, however, Peterson exemplifies the important role that rhetoric plays in our assessment and acceptance of certain technologies. Peterson’s account of The Bomb is an unfortunate byproduct of American nationalist dogma, but the social experiment (...)
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  5.  2
    Technology Neutrality in European Regulation of GMOs.Per Sandin, Christian Munthe & Karin Edvardsson Björnberg - 2022 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 25 (1):52-68.
    ABSTRACT Objections to the current EU regulatory system on genetically modified organisms in terms of high cost and lack of consistency, speed and scientific underpinning have prompted proposals for a more technology-neutral system. We sketch the conceptual background of the notion of ‘technology neutrality’ and propose a refined definition of the term. The proposed definition implies that technology neutrality of a regulatory system is a gradual and multidimensional feature. We use the definition to analyze two regulatory reform proposals: One proposal (...)
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  6.  16
    The Environmental Constituents of Flourishing: Rethinking External Goods and the Ecological Systems That Provide Them.Kenneth Shockley - 2022 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 25 (1):1-20.
    ABSTRACT It seems intuitive that human development and environmental protection should go hand in hand. But some have worried there is no framework within environmental ethics that suitably conjoins them. In this paper I suggest we approach this challenge by rethinking a very old idea, external goods. I argue that we can see the basis for the required framework if we recognize the normative significance of our natural environment in the same way Aristotle thought we needed to recognize the normative (...)
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