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  1.  1
    Agricultural Technologies as Living Machines: Toward a Biomimetic Conceptualization of Smart Farming Technologies.Vincent Blok & Bart Gremmen - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (2):246-263.
    ABSTRACTSmart Farming Technologies raise ethical issues associated with the increased corporatization and industrialization of the agricultural sector. We explore the concept of biomimicry to conceptualize smart farming technologies as ecological innovations which are embedded in and in accordance with the natural environment. Such a biomimetic approach of smart farming technologies takes advantage of its potential to mitigate climate change, while at the same time avoiding the ethical issues related to the industrialization of the agricultural sector. We explore six principles of (...)
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  2.  3
    Beware of the Toll Keepers: The Ethics of Geoengineering Ethics.Adam Briggle - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (2):187-189.
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  3.  4
    ‘More Than an Idea or a Norm’: Religion, Justice, and Practicality in Dialog with the Tollgate Principles.Forrest Clingerman, Laura M. Hartman & Kevin J. O’Brien - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (2):190-193.
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  4.  3
    Responsibility in Practice: Hans Jonas as Environmental Political Theorist.Lewis Coyne - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (2):229-245.
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  5.  4
    The Tollgate Principles for the Governance of Geoengineering: Moving Beyond the Oxford Principles to an Ethically More Robust Approach.Stephen M. Gardiner & Augustin Fragnière - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (2):143-174.
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  6. Environmental Trolley Problems and Ethical Assumptions in the Geoengineering Debate.Kevin Meeker - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (2):178-180.
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  7.  2
    Putting the Tollgate Principles Into Practice.David R. Morrow - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (2):175-177.
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  8.  1
    Examining the Implications of the Tollgate Principles for the Governance of Geoengineering.Lorenzo Nericcio - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (2):184-186.
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  9.  1
    A Different Kind of Rigor: What Climate Scientists Can Learn From Emergency Room Doctors.Kent A. Peacock - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (2):194-214.
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  10.  3
    Is Climate Change Morally Good From Non-Anthropocentric Perspectives?Toby Svoboda & Jacob Haqq-Misra - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (2):215-228.
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  11. Caution in Defining the Public for Legitimate Geoengineering Governance.Ivo Wallimann-Helmer - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (2):181-183.
    Although I believe that Gardiner and Fragnière are right to claim that geoengineering governance demands participatory structures, I think more caution is needed. First, the public to be considered because it is affected must be differentiated depending on the geoengineering technique at issue and on the severity of its impact. Second, to avoid undermining democratic legitimacy, ethical conditions of legitimacy must be carefully assessed. Even though future generations and nature are very likely to be affected by geoengineering, their representation is (...)
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  12.  2
    Opposing California’s WaterFix: The Trump Administration and the Future of Environmental Advocacy.Razvan Amironesei & Caleb Scoville - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (1):29-33.
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  13.  1
    The Politics of Apathy: Trumping the Ethical Imperative of Climate Change.Nino Antadze - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (1):45-47.
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  14.  3
    Commutative Justice and Access and Benefit Sharing for Genetic Resources.Anna Deplazes-Zemp - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (1):110-126.
    The Convention on Biological Diversity and its Nagoya Protocol established an Access and Benefit Sharing system between utilizers and providers of genetic resources. ABS is understood as a tool that should promote commutative justice between the involved parties. This essay discusses what exactly it is that is being exchanged in the ABS process. It critically analyses moral claims to compensation that are implied by the ABS system for genetic resources. It argues that with the exception of cases in which traditional (...)
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  15.  5
    The Dangers of Replacing ‘Adaptation to Climate Change’ with ‘Resilient Solutions’.Justin Donhauser - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (1):34-38.
  16.  1
    Distributing Risks: Allocation Principles for Distributing Reversible and Irreversible Losses.Neelke Doorn - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (1):96-109.
    This paper aims to develop a framework for distributing risks. Based on a distinction between risks with reversible losses and risks with irreversible losses, I defend the following composite allocation principle: first, irreversible risks should be allocated on the basis of needs and only after some threshold level has been achieved can the remaining risks distributed in such a way that the total disvalue of these losses is minimized. An important advantage of this allocation framework is that it does not (...)
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  17.  2
    Trump’s Military as the De Facto Environmental Leader.Jai Galliott - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (1):13-16.
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  18. To Trump’s Chagrin, Non-Nationals Are Still In.Eric S. Godoy - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (1):42-44.
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  19.  47
    Climate Change, Moral Integrity, and Obligations to Reduce Individual Greenhouse Gas Emissions.Trevor Hedberg - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (1):64-80.
    Environmental ethicists have not reached a consensus about whether or not individuals who contribute to climate change have a moral obligation to reduce their personal greenhouse gas emissions. In this paper, I side with those who think that such individuals do have such an obligation by appealing to the concept of integrity. I argue that adopting a political commitment to work toward a collective solution to climate change—a commitment we all ought to share—requires also adopting a personal commitment to reduce (...)
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  20.  3
    From a National Monument to a National Disgrace.Margot Higgins - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (1):9-12.
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  21.  2
    Those Who Bring From the Earth: Anti-Environmentalism and the Trope of the White Male Worker.John Hultgren - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (1):21-25.
    The 2016 Republican Party platform is unabashed in its rejection of environmental principles and its embrace of extractive labor. Its ‘Natural Resources’ section reads: ‘[w]e are the party of America's growers, producers, farmers, ranchers, foresters, miners, commercial fishermen, and all those who bring from the earth the crops, minerals, energy, and the bounties of our seas.’ What is interesting about this statement is its selective view of productive labor. Not all who bring from the earth are equally valued within the (...)
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  22. If You’Re ‘Still In’ the Paris Climate Agreement, Then Show Us the Money.Georges Alexandre Lenferna - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (1):52-55.
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  23.  2
    Social Constructivism and Beyond. On the Double Bind Between Politics and Science.Matthias Lievens & Anneleen Kenis - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (1):81-95.
    Moving beyond the post-political framing of the climate change debate, scholars have tried to show that scientific practice is based on politically significant forms of social construction. While sympathizing with this attempt, this paper questions their use of the term ‘political’. Drawing on post-foundational political theory and focusing on the example of climate denialism, it argues that the relation between science and the political constitutes a double bind: while upholding an original distinction between science and the political is untenable, representing (...)
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  24. Year One of Donald Trump’s Presidency on Climate and the Environment.Andrew Light & Benjamin Hale - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (1):1-3.
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  25.  2
    The Case for Preserving Bears Ears.Justin McBrayer & Sarah Roberts-Cady - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (1):48-51.
    In December of 2017, President Trump reduced the size of Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante Monuments by 2 million acres. Conservatives rejoiced, and progressives railed. Yet neither side has clearly identified the moral facets of the situation. The crucial moral question is this: How ought public property be regulated to protect landscapes with cultural significance? We offer criteria for determining when something has cultural value and argue that the moral merits of the present case turn on whether the reduction adequately (...)
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  26.  2
    Two Moral Arguments for a Global Social Cost of Carbon.Kian Mintz-Woo - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (1):60-63.
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  27.  4
    Bristol Bay and Pebble Mine: Mutual Flourishing or Midas’ Touch.David L. O’Hara - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (1):26-28.
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  28.  1
    Equitable Local Climate Action Planning: Sustainable & Affordable Housing.Andrew Pattison & Jason Kawall - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (1):17-20.
    Despite projected devastating impacts on human communities, the US still lacks comprehensive national policies aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions. This vacuum has provided the space for a surge of promising sustainability and climate action planning efforts at the state and local level. Meanwhile, according to the National Low Income Housing Coalition’s (2015) Out of Reach Report, ‘there is no state in the US where a minimum wage worker working full time can afford a one-bedroom apartment at the fair market (...)
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  29.  2
    An Analysis of Potential Ethical Justifications for Mammoth De-Extinction And a Call for Empirical Research.Yasha Rohwer & Emma Marris - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (1):127-142.
    We argue that the de-extinction of the mammoth cannot be ethically grounded by duties to the extinct mammoth, to ecosystem health or to individual organisms in ecosystems missing the mammoth. However, the action can be shown to be morally permissible via the goods it will afford humans, including advances in scientific knowledge, valuable experiences of awe and pleasure, and perhaps improvements to our moral character or behaviour—if and only if suffering is minimal. Finally, we call for empirical research into how (...)
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  30.  8
    Rational Coherence in Environmental Policy: Paris, Montreal, and Kigali.Nathaniel Sharadin - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (1):4-8.
    In June 2017, President Trump announced that the US intends to withdraw from the Paris Agreement. The decision was widely viewed as an abrogation of US leadership in confronting a changing climate. I’m not interested here in the decision to withdraw from Paris per se. Instead, I’m interested in Paris as a useful contrast for the administration’s attitude towards a different international environmental agreement: the Montreal Protocol.
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  31.  1
    The Axiological Problem with Trump’s Wall and Endangered Species.Ian A. Smith - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (1):39-41.
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  32.  1
    Going to Alone: Cities and States for Climate Action.Lachlan Montgomery Umbers & Jeremy Moss - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (1):56-59.
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