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  1. Art and Education in Dewey: Accomplishing Unity, Bringing Newness to the Fore.Vasco D'Agnese - 2016 - Education and Culture 32 (2):80-98.
    The aim of this paper is to discuss the role of art in Deweyan thought, making a case for the relationship among art, experience, and education. I will do so by drawing on both Deweyan works—primarily Art as Experience1 and chapter nine of Experience and Nature2—and scholarly literature devoted to the issue.3 Based on such precedents, I wish to argue that art plays a central function in Deweyan thought. Dewey conceived of art as the basis on which to deepen, enlarge, (...)
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  2. Progressive Museum Practice: John Dewey and Democracy.Dyehouse Jeremiah - 2016 - Education and Culture 32 (2):119-122.
    In his fortieth anniversary commemoration of the Cooper Union Museum for the Arts and Decoration in 1937, John Dewey wrote confidently about the development of museums as educational institutions. As Dewey argued, “[o]ne of the most striking features of recent American culture has been the rapid growth of museums in all lines, artistic, commercial and industrial; of natural history, anthropology and antiquities.” Dewey explained that it “has become generally recognized” that museums “occupy as necessary a place in popular education as (...)
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  3.  1
    Dewey From STEM to STEAM.David Granger - 2016 - Education and Culture 32 (2):1-3.
    Welcome, one and all, to volume 32, issue 2 of Education & Culture. I originally began assembling this issue without a specific theme in mind. Nonetheless, as you can see from the title of my remarks, one soon began to emerge. More than a few scholars have commented on an apparent shift in Dewey’s later writings that provided a counterbalance to his ardent attention to science in his early- and middle-period works—a so-called aesthetic turn. It seems to me that this (...)
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  4.  2
    Experience and Expression.Hanes Jay Michael & Weisman Eleanor - 2016 - Education and Culture 32 (2):64-79.
    … and all the rhythmic crises that punctuate the stream of living.1Through the course of the twentieth century, John Dewey built a reputation as a pragmatic philosopher who influenced notions of education, democracy, and the arts. Dewey has long been known for his emphasis on the power of reflection, and much scholarship on the role of reflection has been generated for classroom learning and pedagogy. Dewey’s definition of democracy emphasized individual freedoms balanced with social responsibility. He identified the instructive value (...)
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  5. What We Can Teach When We Teach Religion.Larry A. Hickman - 2016 - Education and Culture 32 (2):4-17.
    Let me begin by thanking the society’s officers: President Kathleen Knight-Abowitz, President-Elect Len Waks, immediate past President Deron Boyles, Secretary-Treasurer Kyle Greenwalt, membership and development officer Mark Kissling, and of course student liaison Matt Ryg and webmaster Zane Wubbena. I know that their many efforts on behalf of this society are much appreciated by all of us.In 1955, when Will Herberg published his influential book, Protestant–Catholic–Jew, it could be said with some confidence that an essay in American religious sociology could (...)
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  6.  1
    Dewey and Sports: An Overview of Sport in His Work.Jaitner David - 2016 - Education and Culture 32 (2):35-49.
    Inherent in the cultural naturalism of John Dewey is a deep connection between experience and nature. Experience is the humanly possible interplay with nature, “a means of penetrating continually further into the heart of nature”. Nature is the bedrock of experience, captured in a concept that no longer refers to a “block universe” —an essentially given, firmly established order of things, beings, and species—but rather “a realm of existence, composed of events”, temporally and spatially situated appearances which can be given (...)
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  7.  1
    Aesthetic and Affective Experiences in Coffee Shops: A Deweyan Engagement with Ordinary Affects in Ordinary Spaces.Nautiyal Jaishikha - 2016 - Education and Culture 32 (2):99-118.
    “In a coffee shop in a city, which is every coffee shop in every city, on a day which is everyday …”1Even in her incompleteness, iconic singer-songwriter Ani DiFranco makes a poignant point. Her point pertains to the ubiquity of a coffee shop in a city, which is every coffee shop in every city on a day that is everyday. Such is the vitality of these third places that offer relaxing space and time over and above coffee and other related (...)
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  8. What Use Is Instrumentalism?: Conservative Pragmatism in Liberal Learning.Seth C. Vannatta - 2016 - Education and Culture 32 (2):18-34.
    The utilitarian and consumerist model of higher education undervalues the importance and worth of the liberal arts in higher education, both globally and locally. Globally speaking, it does not take long to flip through a national newspaper or to click through the Chronicle of Higher Education to find either some call for the academy to train students for the current set of jobs available, especially for which there is high demand, low supply, and a national need, or critical responses to (...)
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  9.  4
    The Poetry of John Dewey.Jerry L. Williams - 2016 - Education and Culture 32 (2):50-63.
    “Poetry, art, religion are precious things.”The American philosopher John Dewey is an iconic figure. A prolific writer, his scholarly attention variously focused upon philosophy, education, democracy, economics, and aesthetics. It is not commonly known, however, that behind the scenes in his private office at Columbia University, Dewey also wrote poetry.2 Without his knowledge or consent, ninety-eight poems were collected from his wastebasket in 1930 by a custodian. Additional “scraps” and poems were found in his office desk after his retirement, bringing (...)
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  10.  4
    Introduction: Maxine Greene on Democracy and the Social Imagination.Kathleen Knight Abowitz - 2016 - Education and Culture 32 (1):1-3.
    In assembling scholars for the John Dewey Symposium for the 2015 Annual Meeting in Chicago, I sought thinkers who would critically engage Maxine Greene’s philosophy of democratic education. The recent death of Greene, long-time member of the Society, friend and teacher of many members, and John Dewey Lecturer in 1988, had left a powerful absence among educational philosophers, and many had honored her legacy with loving tributes. The Symposium’s aim was to bring together scholars in critical engagement with her work.Greene (...)
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  11. Teachers, Leaders, and Schools: Essays by John Dewey.Jon G. Bradley - 2016 - Education and Culture 32 (1):153-155.
    Collections demand great care. In any attempt to select, sift, and/or package the literary efforts of a major literary figure, whatever is included will be debated and found wanting. For example, what short stories of Ernest Hemingway or sonnets of William Shakespeare or pithy comments of Winston Churchill would make up a selected collection? The choices and possibilities are numerous, and the possible repercussions mind bending. Arguments are sure to ensue, and even like-minded advocates will fiercely debate the inclusion or (...)
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  12.  1
    Dewey Anticipates Habermas's Paradigm of Communication: The Critique of Individualism and the Basis for Moral Authority In Democracy and Education.Brian W. Dotts - 2016 - Education and Culture 32 (1):111-129.
    Of unparalleled importance in John Dewey’s democratic philosophy is his focus on the process of change, or the “continuous reconstruction of experience.”1 But how is change to take place and under what circumstances does it best occur? What are the ramifications of Dewey’s theory of change and reconstruction on representative government and political rule? Is change expected to occur pragmatically as a planned process, or is change understood as inchoate phenomena occurring sporadically in Dewey’s philosophy? Who determines change and the (...)
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  13. John Dewey and the Artful Life: Pragmatism, Aesthetics, and Morality.Eric A. Evans - 2016 - Education and Culture 32 (1):157-162.
    The overriding question Stroud confronts in John Dewey and the Artful Life is how to render more of life’s experiences, including the ensuing benefits, as aesthetic or artful as possible. The answer to this question is challenging and complex. The claim most aesthetic theories make is that an object, activity, or experience is artful if and only if it has intrinsic value. Although what constitutes intrinsic value is widely contested, having value in and of itself is a necessary and sufficient (...)
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  14.  3
    Democracy and the Industrial Imagination in American Education.Steven Fesmire - 2016 - Education and Culture 32 (1):53-61.
    Media fact-checkers promptly corrected Marco Rubio when he called for more vocational education during the November 2015 GOP presidential debate: “Welders make more money than philosophers,” he said. “We need more welders than philosophers.” It was widely pointed out in response to Senator Rubio’s remark that, on average, those who major in philosophy at a college or university tend to have higher salaries than professional welders. But this point, despite its utility for promoting philosophy as an academic major, is a (...)
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  15. Maxine Greene on Progressive Education: Toward a Public Philosophy of Education.James M. Giarelli - 2016 - Education and Culture 32 (1):5-14.
    I have been reading and teaching Maxine Greene’s work for many years. I began teaching philosophy and education classes forty years ago as a doctoral student and have used a Maxine Greene text in every one. I’ve used The Public School and the Private Vision, Teacher as Stranger, Landscapes of Learning, Dialectic of Freedom, Releasing the Imagination, Variations on a Blue Guitar, and many other chapters, articles, and essays.1 I’ve had several opportunities to write about her work, her standing within (...)
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  16.  1
    Liberalism and Beyond: Toward a Public Philosophy of Education.Maxine Greene - 2016 - Education and Culture 32 (1):41-51.
    The educational philosophers who wrote in The Social Frontier dealt unabashedly with problems arising out of the social conflicts of their time. Their universe of discourse opened outward to the turbulent domains of politics, economics, and the ideational changes occurring all·around. Fundamental to their concern was the question of liberty in its relation to equality and social control. Rejecting 18th century atomistic notions, persistent dualisms, and the association of liberalism with laissez-faire ideas, they sought a view that “combined equality and (...)
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  17.  1
    Richard J. Bernstein and the Pragmatist Turn in Contemporary Philosophy: Rekindling Pragmatism's Fire.Jared Kemling - 2016 - Education and Culture 32 (1):163-167.
    As the title of the book indicates, Bernstein’s 2010 work The Pragmatic Turn is the common ground for this collection of twelve essays, with each contributor taking a theme from Bernstein’s volume and using it as a foundation to raise further issues concerning pragmatism after the “pragmatic turn.” Many essays also offer constructive criticism of Bernstein’s thought and positions, often suggesting possible alternatives. In a style reminiscent of the long-running Library of Living Philosophers series, Bernstein provides a short response to (...)
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  18. The Dialectical Imagination of Maxine Greene: Social Imagination as Critical Pedagogy.Wendy Kohli - 2016 - Education and Culture 32 (1):15-24.
    Over 25 years ago, 1988 to be exact, Maxine Greene delivered the annual John Dewey Lecture. That lecture, “The Dialectic of Freedom,” was the foundation for her book of the same title, also published in 1988 by Teachers College Press. In his foreword to the book, the late Bob Gowin, a philosopher of education at Cornell University, introduced the text with the following:Many dialectics are working in this beautifully written book, and no single formulation will capture the whole. It is (...)
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  19.  1
    Cultivating Civic Habits: A Deweyan Analysis of the National Council for the Social Studies Position Statement on Guidelines for Social Studies Teaching and Learning.E. Mason Lance - 2016 - Education and Culture 32 (1):87-110.
    The National Council for the Social Studies position statement on “Curriculum Guidelines for Social Studies Teaching and Learning” provides a conceptual outline for contemporary social studies curriculum. The purported goal is to “promote civic competence” in order to “help young people develop the ability to make informed and reasoned decisions for the public good as citizens of a culturally diverse, democratic society in an interdependent world.”1 The statement reaffirms the importance of social studies in the wake of No Child Left (...)
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  20.  2
    Ethical Principles and School Challenges: A Deweyan Analysis.Douglas J. Simpson & Donal M. Sacken - 2016 - Education and Culture 32 (1):63-86.
    John Dewey is a well-known proponent of certain aspects of progressive education, including the idea that students and teachers should be reflective co-inquirers, not just acquirers of information.1 Among his many other educational ideas are the continuing need to reconstruct school conditions and environments, pedagogical thinking and practice, curricular planning and development, and educational activities and outcomes.2 In the field of education, however, his ideas of ethical inquiry, thinking, and decision-making are not as widely known as his views of teaching (...)
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  21.  1
    Two Functions of the Imagination in Greene's Aesthetic Educational Theory.James Stillwaggon - 2016 - Education and Culture 32 (1):25-39.
    In Art as Experience, Dewey claims that “‘imagination’ shares with ‘beauty’ the doubtful honor of being the chief theme in esthetic writings of enthusiastic ignorance. More perhaps than any other phase of the human contribution, it has been treated as a special and self-contained faculty, differing from others in possession of mysterious potencies.”1 Despite this “doubtful honor,” or as some might claim, because of it, imagination seems to have become a matter of unquestionable value in educational rhetoric over the last (...)
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  22. Aesthetic, Spiritual, And Flow Experiences: Contrasts And Educational Implications.P. Bruce Uhrmacher, Christy McConnell Moroye & Bradley Conrad - 2016 - Education and Culture 32 (1):131-151.
    The idea for our paper began with a practical problem. As curricularists dedicated to an aesthetic approach to teaching, curriculum, and learning, we regularly provide workshops on this topic for teachers in K–12 schools. Our own work is based on Dewey’s aesthetic ideas1 and we have developed a theory called CRISPA2 that teachers may employ to create what we might call “wow” experiences in their own classrooms.3 That is, they can set up the conditions for students to have aesthetic experiences (...)
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