Year:

  1.  8
    In Community of Inquiry with Ann Margaret Sharp.Stephanie Burdick-Shepherd - 2019 - Education and Culture 35 (2):59.
    Ann Margaret Sharp, American philosopher of education, believed that friends could, in fact, be quite critical of one another. Writing in her essay, “What is a Community of Inquiry,” she states,... but children know that the group has taken on a great significance for them: each one’s happiness means as much to each of them as their own. They truly care for each other as persons, and this care enables them to converse in ways they never have before. They can (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  1
    The New Negro: The Life of Alain Locke.Warren E. Whitaker & Robert A. Martin - 2019 - Education and Culture 35 (2):65-68.
    The title of Stewart’s biography is a tribute to Alain Locke’s seminal work, The New Negro: An Interpretation. This 1925 anthology highlighted the works of several up-and-coming black writers of the 20th century, planting these authors and, thus, a new black intellectual movement squarely in the public eye. While Alain Locke and John Dewey did not work directly together, Dewey’s philosophical approaches, specifically aesthetic valuation, significantly influenced Locke’s life. John C. Stewart provides a dense and thorough illustration of Locke’s use (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  2
    Editor's Note.David Granger - 2019 - Education and Culture 35 (2):1.
    Greetings, readers, and welcome to the spring 2019 issue of Education & Culture. This latest edition of the journal features four articles and two book reviews, and it should come as no surprise to anyone familiar with recent scholarship on Dewey that all of the contributors speak in some way to contemporary issues and problems related to the prospects for democracy and/in diversity.We begin with Kathy Hytten's "Cultivating Democratic Hope in Dark Times: Strategies for Action." In her contribution, Hytten explores (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  3
    Virtual Charter Schools and the Democratic Aims of Education.Dustin Hornbeck, Kathleen Knight Abowitz & Andrew Saultz - 2019 - Education and Culture 35 (2):3.
    “When citizens can associate only in certain cases, they regard association as a rare and singular process, and they hardly think of it. When you allow them to associate freely in everything, they end up seeing in association the universal and, so to speak, unique means that men can use to attain the various ends that they propose. Each new need immediately awakens the idea of association. The art of association then becomes, as I said above, the mother science; everyone (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  2
    John Dewey's Rival Versions of Virtue.Jeff Mitchell - 2019 - Education and Culture 35 (2):47.
    John Dewey’s Ethics, which he co-authored with James Hayden Tufts, is now available as an online text in the public domain. Indeed, unrestricted access copies are obtainable on the Internet for both editions of the Ethics: the first edition of 1908 and the much revised second edition of 1932. This should be welcome news for teachers, because the book represents a cornucopian instructional resource. The Ethics constitutes an ambitious and comprehensive work that is organized into three distinct parts, which respectively (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  4
    Guiding Intuitions in Education: Lesson Planning as Consummatory Experience.Leonard J. Waks - 2019 - Education and Culture 35 (2):27.
    Prior to 1980, researchers rarely studied intuition in education. Those in the behaviorist tradition discounted studies of teacher thinking, and regarded all talk of intuition as mysterious nonsense. Since then, however, the cognitive revolution has triumphed. Studies of thinking are commonplace, and have contributed to our understanding of how novices and expert teachers perceive, understand, and act. The current consensus is that novices require explicit rules when carrying out the tasks of teaching, while experts, through years of experience and learning, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  3
    The New Negro: The Life of Alain Locke. Whitaker & Martin - 2019 - Education and Culture 35 (2):65.
  8.  9
    Bordentown: Where Dewey's “Learning to Earn” Met Du Boisian Educational Priorities: The Unique Legacy of a Once Thriving but Largely Forgotten School for Black Students.Connie Goddard - 2019 - Education and Culture 35 (1):49-70.
    On February 20 of 1917, John Dewey addressed a meeting of the Public Education Association in New York City with a paper about vocational education, a topic of particular interest at the time—the Smith–Hughes Act would be signed by President Woodrow Wilson a few days later. The following month, his paper would be published as "Learning to Earn: The Place of Vocational Education in a Comprehensive Scheme of Public Education" in School & Society.1 Of concern to Dewey and many other (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  10
    Dewey's Ideas in Action! Continuing Professional Development in an International Community of Practice.Sabrina R. Goldberg - 2019 - Education and Culture 35 (1):71-100.
    In the first section, the author relates how laboratory schools and communities of practice are no longer limited to a single geographic location and how boundaries for professional development are disappearing because of information and computer technology, such as the Internet, the World Wide Web, and globalization. The second section provides a narrative account of the professional development workshop experiences that occurred during EdTech Summit Africa 2017. In the third section, the author reflects on the conditions that she encountered in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  7
    Editor's Note.David Granger - 2019 - Education and Culture 35 (1):1-2.
    Greetings, readers, and welcome to the spring 2019 issue of Education & Culture. This latest edition of the journal features four articles and two book reviews, and it should come as no surprise to anyone familiar with recent scholarship on Dewey that all of the contributors speak in some way to contemporary issues and problems related to the prospects for democracy and/in diversity.We begin with Kathy Hytten's "Cultivating Democratic Hope in Dark Times: Strategies for Action." In her contribution, Hytten explores (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  15
    Cultivating Democratic Hope in Dark Times: Strategies for Action.Kathy Hytten - 2019 - Education and Culture 35 (1):3-28.
    Over the past few decades, there has been a complicated and often paradoxical public dialogue around the idea of hope. While hope has always been called upon as part of the struggle for social justice and as a motivator and sustainer of work toward creating a better world; it is also something many see as fleeting and naïve, something that can actually get in the way of righteous indignation and revolutionary action. Hope has been discussed as a character trait, similar (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  8
    Dewey's Political Technology From an Anthropological Perspective.Shane J. Ralston - 2019 - Education and Culture 35 (1):29-48.
    I believe that education is the fundamental method of social progress and reform.In the broadest sense, it [Dewey's experimentalism] is the experimentalism of the anthropologist, of the student of human institutions and cultures, impressed by the fundamental role of habit in men and societies and by the manner in which those habits are altered and changed.This article explores the possibility that John Dewey's silence on the matter of which democratic means are needed to achieve democratic ends, while confusing, makes greater (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  6
    Comparative Assessment in John Dewey, Confucius, and Global Philosophy. [REVIEW]Holly Walker-Coté - 2019 - Education and Culture 35 (1):105-108.
    Joseph Grange's book, John Dewey, Confucius, and Global Philosophy, seeks to create a dialogue between Dewey's pragmatism and Confucianism in order to analyze the two traditions and parse out their more salient, and similar, tenets. In order to provide a comparative analysis of Eastern and Western traditions, it is necessary to establish a starting point since they are inherently different due to the cultures in which they have traditionally been embedded.Grange references the popular comparison of John Dewey to a "Second (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  15
    John Dewey, America's Peace-Minded Educator. [REVIEW]Catherine Colagross Willoughby - 2019 - Education and Culture 35 (1):101-104.
    After reading John Dewey, America's Peace-Minded Educator, written by Charles F. Howlett and Audrey Cohan, it would be easy to see how contemporary issues such as the call for a national border wall and the characterization of immigrants as a threat to national security would have incensed John Dewey if he were still alive. Dewey, as depicted by Howlett and Cohan, was an educator who believed that democracy should be shared and preserved in a peaceful manner if it were to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues