Year:

  1.  13
    The Socratic Method, Defeasibility, and Doxastic Responsibility.Peter Boghossian & James Lindsay - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (3):244-253.
    There is an extensive body of philosophical, educational, and popular literature explaining Socratic pedagogy’s epistemological and educational ambitions. However, there is virtually no literature clarifying the relationship between Socratic method and doxastic responsibility. This article fills that gap in the literature by arguing that the Socratic method models many of the features of an ideally doxastically responsible agent. It ties a robust notion of doxastic responsibility to the Socratic method by showing how using defeaters to undermine participants’ knowledge claims can (...)
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  2.  6
    Identity Politics, the Ethos of Vulnerability, and Education.Kristiina Brunila & Leena-Maija Rossi - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (3):287-298.
    In this article, identity politics is understood as a form of politics stressing collective but malleable group identities as the basis of political action. This notion of identity politics also allows thinking of identity as intersectional. The focus of this article, and a problem related to identity politics, is that when discussed in the context of the neoliberal order, identity politics has a tendency to become harnessed by the ethos of vulnerability. Some implications of the ‘vulnerabilizisation’ are considered in the (...)
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  3.  2
    Embodying Skilful Performance: Co-Constituting Body and World in Biotechnology.Gloria Dall’Alba, Jörgen Sandberg & Ravinder Kaur Sidhu - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (3):270-286.
    This article offers a philosophical-empirical account of embodied skilful performance in the practice of plant biotechnology. Drawing on the work of Merleau-Ponty and others, we elaborate how skilful performance emerges from and through reciprocal relations encompassing the body-in-the-world and the world-in-the-body. The contribution of this article lies in offering an account of skilful performance that is attentive to a perceiving, motile, feeling body entwined with world. In genetically modifying plants, scientists direct their senses of touch and vision to manipulating plant (...)
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  4.  3
    Has the Shift to Overworked and Underpaid Adjunct Faculty Helped Education Outcomes?Elvira Nica - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (3):213-216.
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  5.  1
    The Adaptive Professional: Teachers, School Leaders and Ethical-Governmental Practices of Formation.Peter C. O’Brien - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (3):229-243.
    This article analyses the relations that teachers and school leaders establish with themselves and with others—especially those who would seek to govern them—through the professional and personal–professional activities that increasingly accompany pedagogical and administrative practice today. Specifically, the article seeks to analyse the conditions under which such ‘ethical-governmental’ relations have become possible and to clarify the lines of power, truth and ethics that are in play within them. In this way, it is argued, their intelligibility may be recovered; their contingencies (...)
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  6. Embracing the Humanistic Vision: Recurrent Themes in Peter Roberts’ Recent Writings.James Reveley - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (3):312-321.
    Running like a leitmotif through Peter Roberts’ recently published philosophico-educational writings there is a humanistic thread, which this article picks out. In order to ascertain the quality of this humanism, Roberts is positioned in relation to a pair of extant humanisms: radical and integral. Points of comparability and contrast are identified in several of the writer’s genre-crossing essays. These texts, it is argued, rectify deficiencies in how the two humanisms envision alternatives to capitalism. Roberts skilfully teases out the non-obvious futurological (...)
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  7.  38
    Making Sense in Education: Deleuze on Thinking Against Common Sense.Itay Snir - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (3):299-311.
    According to a widespread view, one of the most important roles of education is the nurturing of common sense. In this article I turn to Gilles Deleuze’s concept of sense to develop a contrary view of education—one that views education as a radical challenge to common sense. The discussion will centre on the relation of sense and common sense to thinking. Although adherents of common sense refer to it as the basis of all thought and appeal to critical thinking as (...)
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  8.  1
    Disciplinarity and Normative Education.Strandbrink Peter - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (3):254-269.
    Drawing on recent interdisciplinary, multidimensional research on civic and religious education in northern Europe, this article explores disciplinary epistemological economies in an era of mounting discontent with the narrowness of mono-disciplinary analyses of complex social and educational issues. It is argued in the article that under conditions of sufficient world complexity, interdisciplinarity provides for a more cogent scholarly approach to educational structures and phenomena than either of the logics of mono-, multi- and transdisciplinarity—the main extant alternatives. It is shown in (...)
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  9. Embodied Cognition and Curriculum Construction.Mei-Qian Wang & Xu-Dong Zheng - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (3):217-228.
    The disembodiment of cognitive science has resulted in curricula with disembodied concepts and practice. The emergence of the embodied cognitive science provoked public reflections on the nature of the curriculum. This has elevated the body from the ‘peripheral’ position to the ‘central’ position, acting as the subject in action and becoming the bridge to experience transformations. Meanwhile, the nurturing role of the environment for the mind is attracting increasingly more attention, and the environment, the body, and the mind jointly constitute (...)
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  10.  3
    The Role of Trust in Reflective Practice.Leon Benade - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (2):123-132.
    Trust, as a philosophical concept in education, seems largely taken for granted, either because it is embedded in other discourses, or is self-evidently assumed to be one on which there is general agreement and understanding. Its associated notions, such as confidence and belief, have counters in such concepts as disappointment and betrayal. These various notions come to the fore in interpersonal relations that require openness and self-critique. Critically reflective practice in professional teaching contexts is one such example, where openness means (...)
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  11. Trust as a Virtue in Education.Laura D’Olimpio - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (2):193-202.
    As social and political beings, we are able to flourish only if we collaborate with others. Trust, understood as a virtue, incorporates appropriate rational emotional dispositions such as compassion as well as action that is contextual, situated in a time and place. We judge responses as appropriate and characters as trustworthy or untrustworthy based on these factors. To be considered worthy of trust, as an individual or an institution, one must do the right thing at the right time for the (...)
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  12.  1
    Trust and Fiduciary Relationships in Education: What Happens When Trust is Breached?Grierson Elizabeth Mary - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (2):203-211.
    This paper examines trust as a fundamental aspect of fiduciary relationships in education. The specific relationship under examination is that of academic employee and university employer. Both have the value of trust assigned to them as an implicit part of their social and professional contract. The setting is Australia, but the principles apply to any democratic jurisdiction and educational level or location, where fiduciary principles are a pre-condition for healthy and trustworthy working relationships. The paper firstly discusses the meaning and (...)
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  13.  2
    Trust and the Community of Inquiry.Haynes Felicity - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (2):144-151.
    This article investigates the place of trust in learning relations in the classroom, not only between teacher and student, but also between student and student. To do this, it will first examine a pedagogy called community of inquiry, espoused by John Dewey and used in most Philosophy for Children courses in Australia. It will then consider what different forms of trust are involved in other power relations in the classroom, particularly the rational structuralism of R.S Peters, or the experiential philosophy (...)
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  14.  1
    Trust and Schooling.Bruce Haynes - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (2):119-122.
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  15.  1
    The Role of Trust in the Teaching of History.Bruce Thomas Haynes - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (2):174-182.
    This article is an initial exploration of possibilities opened up by considering trust relations as central to the teaching of history in schools. It is an extension of an investigation into epistemological problems to see whether ‘trust’ is a more fruitful concept to use than ‘truth’ in dealing with those problems and is based on an assumption that trust is more than a moral notion. In recent times, the mining industry has developed the concept of ‘a social license to operate’ (...)
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  16.  2
    Trust and Critical Thinking.John Kleinig - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (2):133-143.
    This article discusses the tension between trust, as an expression of interpersonal commitment, and critical thinking, which includes a demand for reasons. It explores the importance of each for individual flourishing, and then seeks to establish some ways in which they intersect, drawing on ideas of authority and trustworthiness. It argues that despite the appearance of a deep tension between trust and critical thinking, they are importantly interdependent: if trust is to be warranted, critical thinking to determine trustworthiness is required; (...)
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  17.  1
    Does Student Debt Constitute a Bubble That May Bring About an Educational Crisis?Gheorghe H. Popescu - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (2):115-118.
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  18.  1
    The Neurobiology of Trust and Schooling.Derek Sankey - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (2):183-192.
    Are there neurobiological reasons why we are willing to trust other people and why ‘trust’ and moral values such as ‘care’ play a quite pivotal role in our social lives and the judgements we make, including our social interactions and judgements made in the context of schooling? In pursuing this question, this paper largely agrees with claims made by Patricia Churchland in her 2011 book Braintrust. She believes that moral values are rooted in basic brain circuitry and chemistry, which have (...)
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  19. Being Trustworthy: Going Beyond Evidence to Desiring.R. Scott Webster - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (2):152-162.
    If educators are to educate they must be accorded some level of trust. Anthony Giddens claims that because trust is not easily created, it is now being replaced with ‘confidence’ because this latter disposition is much easier to give and is more convenient. It is argued in this paper that this shift from trust to confidence stifles education because emphasis is placed solely upon qualifications and competence, and is neglectful of disclosing one’s motives and desires—which are considered to be essential (...)
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  20. Student Partnership, Trust and Authority in Universities.Morgan White - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (2):163-173.
    Marketisation is rife in higher education. Asymmetries between consumers and producers in markets result in inefficiencies. To address imbalances, policy-makers pushing higher education towards a market model have a tendency to increase the market power of the student by increasing information or amplifying voice. One such policy in England is called ‘students as partners.’ However, I argue here that student partnership can easily undermine relations of authority and trust between students and academic teachers.
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  21.  2
    In Search of a Universal Human Rights Metaphor: Moral Conversations Across Differences.Gordon Mordechai - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (1):83-94.
    This article takes up the educational challenge of the framers of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Specifically, the author explores the question of: how can we talk about a universal conception of human rights in a way that both respects the need for cultural pluralism and the necessity to protect those rights and freedoms that all people—regardless of differences such as race, class, culture, or religion—are entitled to? What metaphor or metaphors can be useful for us to speak clearly (...)
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  22.  2
    Universities, Knowledge and Pedagogical Configurations: Glimpsing the Complex University.Carolina Guzmán-Valenzuela - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (1):5-17.
    This paper elaborates a typology of universities in which each university is characteristically associated with diverse missions, different ways of producing knowledge and contrasting pedagogical configurations. Four university forms are identified, analysed and illustrated, namely the expert university, the non-elite university, the entrepreneurial university and the revolutionary university. It is suggested that the typology and the analysis of university forms offered here provide insight into the current positioning of universities in relation to the wider world and have potential in prompting (...)
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  23.  3
    Killing the Buddha: Towards a Heretical Philosophy of Learning.Viktor Johansson - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (1):61-71.
    This article explores how different philosophical models and pictures of learning can become dogmatic and disguise other conceptions of learning. With reference to a passage from St. Paul, I give a sense of the dogmatic teleology that underpins philosophical assumptions about learning. The Pauline assumption is exemplified through a variety of models of learning as conceptualised by Israel Scheffler. In order to show how the Paulinian dogmatism can give rise to radically different pictures of learning, the article turns to St. (...)
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  24.  2
    Toward a Modern Concept of Schooling: A Case Study on Hegel.Ari Kivelä - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (1):72-82.
    Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel developed the concept of institutionalized education, which reflected public schooling and its legitimacy in the context of rapid transformation of European feudal societies to modern societies. The concept of school reflects the Hegelian theory of Bildung and the concept of modern society. What makes Hegel’s philosophy interesting is his conviction that the processes of Bildung can take place only in the context of social institutions and in the highly organized forms of human interaction regulated by those (...)
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  25.  2
    Rodgers on Calls for Observable Verbs.Mackenzie Jim - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (1):18-27.
    This paper takes up Shannon Rodgers’ 2016 critique of curriculum writers’ call for observable verbs, pp. 563–578), and argues that a more effective line of critique should focus not on metaphorical thinking, but on the notion of observation itself, by way of Nietzsche on metaphor, the history of astronomy, the non-existence of dragons and dissuading indigenous people from voting.
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  26.  32
    Page, Text and Screen in the University: Revisiting the Illich Hypothesis.Lavinia Marin - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (1):49-60.
    In the age of web 2.0, the university is constantly challenged to re-adapt its ‘old-fashioned’ pedagogies to the new possibilities opened up by digital technologies. This article proposes a rethinking of the relation between university and (digital) technologies by focusing not on how technologies function in the university, but on their constituting a meta-condition for the existence of the university pedagogy of inquiry. Following Ivan Illich’s idea that textual technologies played a crucial role in the inception of the university, we (...)
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  27. Universities as Gendered Organizations.Mihăilă Ramona - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (1):1-4.
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  28. The Formation of the Willing Citizen – Tracing Reactive Nihilism in Late Capitalist Adult Education.Maria Olson, Magnus Dahlstedt, Andreas Fejes & Fredrik Sandberg - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (1):95-103.
    The role of education in citizen training has been well mapped out in youth education. What has been less studied is how this role comes into being in adult education. By providing illustrative empirical examples from a recently completed study of adult students enrolled in adult education, this article aims to offer a theoretical response to the question of the role of adult education in adult student citizen subjectivity formation. Taking on Diken’s concept of ‘reactive nihilism’, we wish to make (...)
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  29. Thinking in/Through Movements; Working with/in Affect Within the Context of Norwegian Early Years Education and Practice.Rossholt Nina - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (1):28-38.
    This paper draws on data undertaken with very young children within the context of Norwegian kindergartens. Specifically, the paper focuses on non-human and human movements. Mine included, that are undertaken in time and space. Following I argue that as the researcher I am always already entangled in inquiry and that there is no beginning. As a consequence, I cannot offer an account concerning movements that are predicated on humanist notions of linearity. Moreover, by immersing myself in process ontology, my efforts (...)
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  30.  3
    That’s Not Very Deleuzian”: Thoughts on Interrupting the Exclusionary Nature of “High Theory.Kathryn J. Strom - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (1):104-113.
    In the following essay, I discuss my own uneasy and nonlinear journey from the classroom to Deleuze, describing the concepts and lines of thought that have been productive in thinking differently about teaching and teacher education. I also detail my encounters with the surprising orthodoxies of using Deleuzian/Deleuzoguattarian thought. From these, I suggest that ‘being Deleuzian’ is itself a molar line that serves as an exclusionary mechanism, working to preserve high theory for the use of only a select few. Instead, (...)
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  31.  1
    Is Second Language Teaching Enslavement or Empowerment? Insights From an Hegelian Perspective.Wu Manfred Man-fat - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (1):39-48.
    Whether second language teaching contributes to the enslavement or empowerment of learners has become a branch in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages research. More and more discussions are emerging, and they tend to base on more and more diverse theoretical frameworks. This article aims to shed light on this issue by exploring it from a Hegelian framework of language. Among Hegel’s theories of language, two notions, namely, mutual recognition and universalisation of culture are selected for discussions. The conclusion (...)
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