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  1. Peace Education in a Conflict-Affected Society: An Ethnographic Journey. [REVIEW]Jeff Aguiar - 2017 - Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 27 (1):114-118.
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  2. Living in a Liminal Peace.Sean Byrne, Robert C. Mizzi & Nancy Hansen - 2017 - Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 27 (1):24-51.
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  3. The Equality of Freedom and Catholic Public Theology in the United States.David E. DeCosse - 2017 - Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 27 (1):72-88.
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  4. Understanding Oppression, Theorizing its Reproduction, & Forecasting its End.Surulola Eke - 2017 - Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 27 (1):89-101.
    Oppression is a universal experience even though many agents and targets are oblivious of their roles. The unconsciousness of the oppressed and dominated individuals and some of those who are responsible for their dehumanizing experiences ensure that the phenomenon is unseen, hence unchallenged. Not only does the lack of awareness keep the oppressed submerged in this reality, but also prevents them from seeing how their response to oppression may help to perpetuate the system. Therefore, the first step in breaking the (...)
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  5. Hope and Temporality in the Irish Long Peace.Candler Hallman - 2017 - Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 27 (1):3-23.
    Throughout the Northern Irish Peace Process, there has been a conflict over how the state should support those affected by the conflict colloquially referred to as the Troubles. In this paper I use ethnographic research to argue that protest against the peace process is made meaningful through different temporal constructions of hope—what and how individual activists view as the future moral good. Hoping is a cultural and political practice with which individuals orient themselves to one another and to different political (...)
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  6. Ecological Politics. [REVIEW]Rand Herz - 2017 - Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 27 (1):106-109.
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  7. On ASIO’s Advice.Binoy Kampmark - 2017 - Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 27 (1):52-71.
    This paper assesses the approach to indefinite detention adopted by the Australian government, suggesting that it is a product of incremental reasoning favouring procedure over observing substantive rights. Specific emphasis is given to the category of detainees deemed to be refugees, but assessed as a pressing security threat. The United Nations Human Rights Committee has found such approaches in violation of international law. Disproportionate measures, it is argued, have been taken regarding such a class of refugees, in direct violation of (...)
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  8. Drones and the Future of Armed Conflict: Ethical, Legal, and Strategic Implications. [REVIEW]Emily Sawicki-Barone - 2017 - Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 27 (1):102-105.
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  9. Humor and Nonviolent Struggle in Serbia. [REVIEW]Irina Subotić - 2017 - Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 27 (1):110-113.
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