20 found

Year:

  1.  1
    Integrating Ethics Training Into an Undergraduate Research Program.Shurooq al Hashimi, Mercedes Sheen, Jessica Essary & Majeda Humeidan - 2016 - Teaching Ethics 16 (2):243-250.
    This paper presents a model for integrating research ethics training into an undergraduate research program. The Undergraduate Research Scholars Program is a five-semester training program designed to teach research methods to multidisciplinary undergraduate students at Zayed University. The main challenge for the URSP ethics training is to be relevant and broad and this is best addressed through the use of the Triplex teaching model which consists of three integrative approaches: contextualization, conceptualization and problem-centering. The Triplex model uses teaching techniques such (...)
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  2.  2
    Teaching Ethics Ecologically.Jonathan Beever - 2016 - Teaching Ethics 16 (2):195-206.
    Narrative based real world case examples are powerful tools by which to help learners more empathetically engage the complexity of ethical conflicts and interactions, enabling clearer analysis of ecological ethical issues and overcoming apathy toward real-world responses. In this paper, I develop ecological ethical inquiry as a means by which to use narrative-based case studies to help ethicists connect to and empathize with other morally relevant individuals. I argue that ecological issues not only benefit from but also require a narrative (...)
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  3.  2
    From Practice to Research.Davis Michael - 2016 - Teaching Ethics 16 (2):251-260.
    This paper proposes a novel research program to assess methods of teaching engineering ethics, a program that would allow ordinary instructors, with little effort, to turn ordinary assessment tools into publishable research, whether the course in question is a stand-alone course in professional ethics or a technical course in which some professional ethics has been inserted. The paper has three parts. The first briefly distinguishes the subject of this research from the main line of research in ethics education. The main (...)
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  4.  1
    Developing Sensitivity to Structural Injustice in a Foundation Humanities Course.A. Kelly Kathleen - 2016 - Teaching Ethics 16 (2):223-232.
    Foundation humanities courses often have as one of their objectives to raise awareness of ethical issues so that students get a taste for what might be involved in ethics courses and might build on that foundation in later courses. This three-week unit introduces Iris Marion Young’s social-connection model for responding to injustices caused by social structures and processes, and then applies that model to the response to injustices revealed in the memoir I Shall Not Hate by the Palestinian doctor Izzeldin (...)
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  5.  2
    Reflections On... The “Borders” of Identity and Intuition.Deborah S. Mower - 2016 - Teaching Ethics 16 (2):147-160.
    Because we automatically categorize individuals into members of in- or outgroups based on their perceived similarity to us, our social identity creates limitations and bias in our thinking. I examine the ways in which banal nationalism, cultural identifications, and group membership influence our thinking, the assumptions we hold, and the intuitions we form. If our goal is to engage in ethics without borders—a laudable goal—then we must uncover the ways in which our thinking is limited and consider strategies to escape (...)
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  6.  2
    Ethics Education in China.Michael J. Murphy - 2016 - Teaching Ethics 16 (2):233-241.
    Philosophy departments in the United States have a relatively long history of teaching ethics as part of a philosophy curriculum. Further, some innovative programs have instituted “Ethics across the Curriculum,” incorporating ethics into discipline-specific courses in the sciences, in law, in medicine, engineering, and in the humanities. In contrast, the teaching of ethics in China, particularly outside medical schools and the recent focus on international business, is extremely rare. This is slowly changing as faculty from both Chinese and non-Chinese universities (...)
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  7.  2
    The Camels Are Unsustainable.Mary Jane Parmentier & Sharlissa Moore - 2016 - Teaching Ethics 16 (2):207-221.
    Sustainable development has contested meanings, and perspectives vary within and across societies. Emphases can range dramatically from recycling advocacy to eradication of poverty. Assumptions and approaches to sustainable development inherently contain many ethical considerations, yet U.S. students often have a limited understanding of ethical considerations in non-Western and global contexts. This paper describes an academic program on sustainable development we ran to Morocco and Spain. We describe the program’s pedagogy and assess learning related to ethics. The largest impact on students’ (...)
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  8.  2
    Professional Norms.Wade Robison - 2016 - Teaching Ethics 16 (2):185-194.
    It is unfortunate that it is all too easy to find examples of professional misconduct. Professionals are distinguished from the rest of us, and from each other, by learning the special skills and knowledge essential to the practice of their profession, by coming to think in different and distinct ways, and by taking on a special set of moral relations, including furthering the social purpose for which the state recognizes the profession. A professional can thus go wrong in any of (...)
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  9.  3
    Teaching the Ethics of Science and Engineering Through Humanities and Social Science.Skylar Zilliox, Jessica Smith & Carl Mitcham - 2016 - Teaching Ethics 16 (2):161-183.
    Ethical questions posed by emerging technologies call for greater understanding of their societal, economic, and environmental aspects by policymakers, citizens, and the engineers and applied scientists at the heart of their development and application. This article reports on the efforts of one research project that assessed the growth of critical thinking and awareness of these multiple aspects in undergraduate engineering and applied science students, with specific regard to nanotechnology. Students in two required courses, a first-year writing and engineering ethics course (...)
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  10.  7
    Runner Up Entry, “The Bus Puzzle” Case Study.Patrick Beach - 2016 - Teaching Ethics 16 (1):135-136.
  11.  10
    Twenty-Five Years of Ethics Across the Curriculum.Michael Davis, Elisabeth Hildt & Kelly Laas - 2016 - Teaching Ethics 16 (1):55-74.
    After twenty-five years of integrating ethics across the curriculum at the Illinois Institute of Technology, the Center for the Study of Ethics in the Professions conducted a survey of full-time faculty to investigate: a) what ethical topics faculty thought students from their discipline should be aware of when they graduate, b) how widely ethics is currently being taught at the undergraduate and graduate level, c) what ethical topics are being covered in these courses, and d) what teaching methods are being (...)
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  12.  11
    Raskolnikov in the Classroom.Christopher L. Doyle - 2016 - Teaching Ethics 16 (1):91-102.
    This essay argues for the efficacy of teaching Feodor Dostoyevsky’s Crime and Punishment as a hedge against cultural predispositions to legitimize violence in history, contemporary society, and popular entertainment. Describing how high school students have been conditioned to accept certain kinds of violence, the essay also shows how a class of high school students responds to four key scenes from the novel. The essay asserts that both the historical context of Crime and Punishment and Dostoyevsky’s creative brilliance make this novel (...)
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  13.  16
    Who’s Responsible For Global Poverty?Judith Lichtenberg - 2016 - Teaching Ethics 16 (1):1-15.
    This paper has two aims. The first is to describe several sources of the moral responsibility to remedy or alleviate global poverty. The second is to consider what sorts of agents bear the responsibilities associated with each source—in particular, whether they are collective agents like states or societies or individual human beings. We often talk about our responsibilities to poor people, or what we owe them. So the question is who this we is. I argue that the answer depends on (...)
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  14.  9
    The Debiasing Agenda in Ethics Teaching.Bruce Maxwell - 2016 - Teaching Ethics 16 (1):75-90.
    How should ethics educators respond to the picture of moral functioning that has emerged from the cognitive sciences of morality? A critical case study of an instance of knowledge transfer from social and cognitive psychology to the practice of teaching ethics, this paper assesses the answer that behavioral ethics gives to this question. The paper first summarizes the opposition that the notion of “teaching reasoning skills” meets in behavioral ethics and provides some examples of the research findings on which this (...)
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  15.  8
    Teaching How to Read Ethics Texts With the Help of Kierkegaard’s “The Mirror of the Word”.Matthew T. Nowachek - 2016 - Teaching Ethics 16 (1):103-120.
    This essay develops the argument that Søren Kierkegaard’s text “The Mirror of the Word” can serve as a valuable resource for addressing the problem of poor reading habits of students enrolled in introductory ethics courses. Although Kierkegaard writes this text as a way of challenging his Danish contemporaries to read the Bible in a proper manner, it can nevertheless apply to reading ethics texts in that the underlying point Kierkegaard makes is the importance of reading in such a fashion that (...)
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  16.  10
    Introductory Ethics Textbooks.Alan A. Preti - 2016 - Teaching Ethics 16 (1):137-141.
  17.  8
    Winning Entry, “The Bus Puzzle” Case Study.Jesús H. Ramírez - 2016 - Teaching Ethics 16 (1):131-133.
  18.  8
    Crafting Maxims.Tobey Scharding - 2016 - Teaching Ethics 16 (1):37-53.
    To use Kantian ethics in an applied context, decision makers typically try to determine whether the “maxim” of their possible action conforms to Kant’s supreme principle of morality: “I ought never to act except in such a way that I could also will that my maxim should become a universal law” (4:402). The action’s maxim is a way of expressing the decision maker’s (a) putative action and (b) conditions that prompt the action in a (c) preposition of a form that (...)
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  19.  12
    Constructivist Theory and Concept-Based Learning in Professional Nursing Ethics.Edith A. West - 2016 - Teaching Ethics 16 (1):121-130.
    Traditional methods of teaching professional nursing ethics in the classroom have translated into limited success in clinical practice. Students don’t perceive an integration of ethics education in practical clinical settings, while educators grapple with a lack of perceived ‘excellence of moral character’ in their students when they are taught intellectual virtues and theoretical wisdom in the classroom that they do not see demonstrated in the clinical setting. Also traditionally, emphasis in ethics teaching has tended to focus on the nurse-patient relationship, (...)
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  20.  16
    The Ethics of Trigger Warnings.Wendy Wyatt - 2016 - Teaching Ethics 16 (1):17-35.
    Trigger warnings captured national attention in 2014 when students from several U.S. universities called for inclusion of the warnings on course syllabi and in classrooms. Opinions spread through news outlets across the spectrum, and those weighing in were quick to pronounce trigger warnings as either unnecessary coddling and an affront to free speech, or as a responsible pedagogical practice that treats students with respect and minimizes harm. Put simply, the debate about trigger warnings has followed the trajectory of many debates (...)
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