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  1.  18
    Making Our Thoughts Clear.Eli Alshanetsky - 2020 - The Harvard Review of Philosophy 27:71-86.
    We often get clear on our thoughts in the process of putting them into words. I investigate the nature of this process by posing the question, “Do you know which thought you are trying to articulate, before successfully articulating it?” and rejecting two answers to the dilemma it yields. The first is that the answer is yes, and that articulation is either the recollection of prior knowledge or the mere acquisition of a skill or ability rather than of propositional knowledge. (...)
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  2.  22
    An Interview with Peter Carruthers.Romy Aran, Nathan Beaucage, Melissa Kwan & Peter Carruthers - 2020 - The Harvard Review of Philosophy 27:13-21.
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  3.  1
    Editors' Introduction.Nicholas Brown & Tadhg Larabee - 2020 - The Harvard Review of Philosophy 27:5-6.
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  4.  9
    Colour Relations in Black and White.Will Davies - 2020 - The Harvard Review of Philosophy 27:87-100.
    I argue that it is possible to perceptually represent colour relations between two objects, without perceptually representing their colours. Such primitive relational colour representation goes against the orthodox view that we represent colour relations by virtue of representing colours. I first argue that under certain assumptions, PRCR is conceptually and even nomically possible. I then compare two possible models of PRCR: the linguaform model and chromatic edge model, the latter involving iconic rather than discursive representation. I argue that the chromatic (...)
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  5. The Explanatory Indispensability of Memory Traces.Felipe De Brigard - 2020 - The Harvard Review of Philosophy 27:23-47.
    During the first half of the twentieth century, many philosophers of memory opposed the postulation of memory traces based on the claim that a satisfactory account of remembering need not include references to causal processes involved in recollection. However, in 1966, an influential paper by Martin and Deutscher showed that causal claims are indeed necessary for a proper account of remembering. This, however, did not settle the issue, as in 1977 Malcolm argued that even if one were to buy Martin (...)
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  6.  17
    Determinacy of Content.Hans-Johann Glock - 2020 - The Harvard Review of Philosophy 27:101-120.
    Few arguments against intentional states in animals have stood the test of time. But one objection by Stich and Davidson has never been rebutted. In my reconstruction it runs: Ascribing beliefs to animals is vacuous, unless something counts as an animal believing one specific “content” rather than another; Nothing counts as an animal believing one specific content rather than another, because of their lack of language; Ergo: Ascribing beliefs to animals is vacuous. Several attempts to block the argument challenge the (...)
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  7.  30
    Learning From What Color Experiences Are Good For.Frank Jackson - 2020 - The Harvard Review of Philosophy 27:49-58.
    Color is an incredibly controversial topic. Here is a sample of views taken seriously: colors are dispositions to look coloured; colors are physical properties of surfaces or of light; colors are properties of certain mental states, which get projected onto the surfaces of objects or onto reflected or transmitted light; colors are an illusion; colors are sui generis. One hopes to break the impasse by finding a compelling starting point—one drawing on obvious points that are common ground—which naturally evolves into (...)
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  8.  14
    How Not to Think of Perception.Søren Overgaard - 2020 - The Harvard Review of Philosophy 27:121-132.
    Perception seems like it puts us directly in touch with real things in our environment. But according to a popular view, perception actually does no such thing. Perceptual experiences are internally generated imagery, and we don’t see what is really out there. I call this view “the Hard-Nosed View,” and I argue that it is deeply problematic. In fact, the view is self-defeating: it undermines the very evidence supposed to establish or support the view. Indeed, if perceptual experiences are just (...)
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  9.  4
    Filling In and the Nature of Visual Experience.Michael Tye - 2020 - The Harvard Review of Philosophy 27:59-69.
    This essay begins with a discussion of the phenomenon of filling in. It is argued that filling in is naturally accounted for by taking visual experiences to be importantly like drawn pictures of the world outside. An alternative proposal is then considered, one that models visual experiences on incomplete descriptions. It is shown that introspection does not favor the pictorial view. It is also shown that the phenomenon of blurriness in visual experience does not provide a good reason for favoring (...)
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  10.  4
    Donna Jackson Nakazawa, The Angel and the Assassin: The Tiny Brain Cell That Changed the Course of Medicine.Justin Wong - 2020 - The Harvard Review of Philosophy 27:133-134.
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  11. An Interview with David Chalmers.Justin Wong, Woojin Lim, Michelle Lara, Benjamin Simon & David Chalmers - 2020 - The Harvard Review of Philosophy 27:1-11.
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