21 found

Year:

  1.  1
    Why Pacifist Leadership Overcomes the Over-Demandingness Objection.Federico Germán Abal - 2019 - The Acorn 19 (2):171-191.
    Being a pacifist who refrains from lethal violence is considered a praiseworthy commitment but not morally obligatory. One reason for denying that pacifism is morally obligatory is the high cost that would be implied for agents under attack, who cannot defend their own lives. Thus, pacifists are usually seen as lambs between lions and, therefore, pacifism is seen as morally over-demanding. In this paper, I intend to clarify the over-demandingness objection and to show its limits against pacifism. First, I argue (...)
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  2. Gandhi for the Twenty-First Century.Douglas Allen, Sanjay Lal & Karsten Struhl - 2019 - The Acorn 19 (2):75-99.
    In this author-meets-critics dialogue, Douglas Allen, author of argues that Gandhi-informed philosophies and practices, when creatively reformulated and applied, are essential for developing positions that are ethical, nonviolent, truthful, and sustainable, providing resources and hope for confronting our ‘Gandhi after 9/11’ crises. Critics Sanjay Lal and Karsten Struhl applaud Allen’s demonstration that Gandhi’s nonviolence is serious and broadly adaptable to the twenty-first century. Yet, Lal poses two philosophical challenges, arguing first that the nonviolent message of the Bhagavad Gita is perhaps (...)
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  3.  3
    Techno-Satyagraha.Michael Allen - 2019 - The Acorn 19 (2):149-169.
    Gandhi scholars agree that he was a critic of capitalism, if not capital or capitalists. Nevertheless, they disagree about his relationship to socialism. Some emphasize Gandhi’s claim that the modern Western canon of socialism is incompatible with the philosophy of nonviolence. Others emphasize his occasional affirmation that he is a socialist, regarding socialism as a beautiful ideal of equality. Gandhi moves back and forth between conditional endorsements of capitalists and socialism’s beautiful ideal. In this article, I ask why Gandhi never (...)
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  4. Gandhi’s Economics and the “Defund the Police” Movement.Michael Allen & Sanjay Lal - 2019 - The Acorn 19 (2):193-196.
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  5. Nonviolence as Manic Rupture of Individualism.Will Barnes - 2019 - The Acorn 19 (2):206-213.
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  6. The Grotesque Cost of Militarism’s Syndemics.Tom H. Hastings - 2019 - The Acorn 19 (2):203-206.
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  7.  3
    Revolutionary Nondualism.Sanjay Lal - 2019 - The Acorn 19 (2):131-148.
    Among those who have worked for uplifting the poor, Mahatma Gandhi occupies a unique place. Although his reform efforts received ample financial support from well-off benefactors, Gandhi’s personal life exemplified ideals of voluntary poverty and renouncement. On Martha Nussbaum’s account of stoicism, Gandhi’s voluntary renouncement may imply morally unacceptable reasoning regarding nonviolence and the plight of the poor. Nussbaum argues that the stoic disparagement of external things of fortune implies that they cannot coherently oppose external harms such as torture or (...)
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  8.  3
    Revolutionary Nondualism.Sanjay Lal - 2019 - The Acorn 19 (2):131-148.
    Among those who have worked for uplifting the poor, Mahatma Gandhi occupies a unique place. Although his reform efforts received ample financial support from well-off benefactors, Gandhi’s personal life exemplified ideals of voluntary poverty and renouncement. On Martha Nussbaum’s account of stoicism, Gandhi’s voluntary renouncement may imply morally unacceptable reasoning regarding nonviolence and the plight of the poor. Nussbaum argues that the stoic disparagement of external things of fortune implies that they cannot coherently oppose external harms such as torture or (...)
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  9. Does Liberal Democracy Require a Gandhian Approach to Religion?Sanjay Lal, Jeff Shawn Jose, Douglas Allen & Michael Allen - 2019 - The Acorn 19 (2):101-129.
    In this author-meets-critics dialogue, Sanjay Lal, author of, argues that Gandhian values of nonviolence raise aspirations of liberal democracy to a higher level. Since Gandhian values of nonviolence are closely associated with religious values, liberal democracy should make public commitments to religions on a non-sectarian basis, except for unreasonable religions. Critic Jeff Shawn Jose agrees that Gandhian values can strengthen liberal democracy. However, Jose finds a contradiction in Lal’s proposal that a liberal state should support reasonable religions only. A more (...)
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  10. Between Gandhi 150 and Sept. 11, 2021.Greg Moses - 2019 - The Acorn 19 (2):71-74.
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  11.  89
    Between Gandhi and Black Lives Matter: The Interreligious Roots of Civil Rights Activism. [REVIEW]Gail Presbey - 2019 - The Acorn 19 (2):197-202.
    Azaransky's work highlights the theological contributions of Howard Thurman, Benjamin Mays, William Stuart Nelson, Pauli Murray and Bayard Rustin. She makes a compelling case that each of these thinker-activists needs to be better appreciated for their cutting-edge theological insights based on their thought and life experience with Mohandas Gandhi and his spiritual activism. Each reinterprets their own Christian views based on this larger worldwide experience that they have gained through study and/or travel. In this way they prefigure or lay the (...)
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  12.  20
    Mahatma Gandhi’s Philosophy of Nonviolence and Truth.Douglas Allen - 2019 - The Acorn 19 (1):5-18.
    In commemoration of the 150th birthday of M. K. ‘Mahatma’ Gandhi, Douglas Allen, author of Gandhi After 9/11, presents an overview of Gandhi’s philosophy focused on two key values or concepts: Truth and Nonviolence. The presentation is offered as an alternative to non-Gandhians, anti-Gandhians, or reactionary Gandhians who often over-idealized the man and his philosophy. With respect to Ahimsa or Nonviolence, it may be easy to see how the value works against overt, physical violence. However, for Gandhi such examples are (...)
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  13.  8
    Acting Out the Kingdom of God. [REVIEW]Charles K. Fink - 2019 - The Acorn 19 (1):48-53.
    Review of Tolstoy and Spirituality (Academic Studies Press, 2018), edited by Pedrag Cicovacki and Heidi Nada Grek, with articles by Miran Bozovic, Predrag Cicovacki, Abdusalam A. Guseynov, Robert Holmes, Božidar Kante, Rosamund Bartlett, Diana Dukhanova, Liza Knapp, Inessa Medzhibovskaya, Donna Tussing Orwin, Mikhail Shishkin, and Alexandra Smith.
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  14.  5
    Hull House, the Pullman Strike, and Tolstoy: Documenting the Work of Jane Addams. [REVIEW]Marilyn Fischer - 2019 - The Acorn 19 (1):54-57.
    The volume is particularly strong in documenting the step-by-step processes through which Hull House grew. The cumulative effect is to recast readers’ image of Addams and Hull House from a singular individual with her remarkable social settlement, to viewing Addams and Hull House as transmission nodes within complex networks of people, organizations, and institutions dedicated to transforming every facet of city life.
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  15.  5
    A New Story for a Politics of Belonging. [REVIEW]Walter Kendall - 2019 - The Acorn 19 (1):61-63.
    Monbiot states that the central task of Out of the Wreckage is to show how community can be rebuilt and how the politics of belonging might develop. The book offers a critique of two failed stories that dominated the 20th century (neo-liberalism and social democracy) and offers a new “story of hope and restoration, a story that might help to light a path towards a better world” for the 21st century.
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  16.  9
    The Gift of Kwe: A Present of Radical Resurgence. [REVIEW]Court Lewis - 2019 - The Acorn 19 (1):64-66.
    Kobade teaches that we must recognize all individuals as links in a familial/community chain from ancestors, to the present, and to future generations. With the recognition of kobade, individuals are then called to develop kwe—knowledge of one’s self that is theoretically anchored to and generated through one’s particular ancestral and lived experience. Kwe is a deep personal knowledge that is produced by combining the past with the present through everyday actions. It creates an attitude and process of engagement with the (...)
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  17.  6
    Author Court D. Lewis Meets Critics on Repentance and the Right to Forgiveness.Court D. Lewis, Gregory L. Bock, David Boersema & Jennifer Kling - 2019 - The Acorn 19 (1):19-41.
    Court D. Lewis, author of Repentance and the Right to Forgiveness, presents a rights-based theory of ethics grounded in eirenéism, a needs-based theory of rights that seeks peaceful flourishing for all moral agents. This approach creates a moral relationship between victims and wrongdoers such that wrongdoers owe victims compensatory obligations. However, one further result is that wrongdoers may be owed forgiveness by victims. This leads to the “repugnant implication” that victims may be wrongdoers who do not forgive. Author Lewis addresses (...)
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  18.  5
    From Canons of Peace to Shoots of Resistance.Greg Moses & Sanjay Lal - 2019 - The Acorn 19 (1):1-3.
    In our feature presentation, “Mahatma Gandhi’s Philosophy of Nonviolence and Truth" Douglas Allen explicates central Gandhian values and concepts in a way that gives readers a kind of ‘one stop’ source for appreciating Gandhi’s nonviolence. In an author-meets-critics dialogue, Court Lewis, author of Repentance and the Right to Forgiveness, defends and clarifies his argument that wrongdoers have a right to forgiveness. Our reviews in this issue invite comparative analysis: Philip J. Rossi’s book on The Ethical Commonwealth in History; a collection (...)
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  19.  6
    Peace and the Unity of Kant’s Critical Project. [REVIEW]Matthew Rukgaber - 2019 - The Acorn 19 (1):43-47.
    Rossi’s book tackles the challenging task of giving a unified picture of a large swath of Kant’s Critical philosophy by attending to the need for epistemic humility from the first Critique, drawing upon the primacy of practical reason and the importance of freedom in both the first and second Critiques, appealing to the anthropological task that Kant set for himself in the Jaesche Logic and Anthropology from a Pragmatic Point of View, exploring the implications of politics and history for the (...)
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  20.  4
    Resisting the Many Faces of Violence. [REVIEW]Paula Smithka - 2019 - The Acorn 19 (1):57-61.
    Each chapter gives the reader a lens through which to see and reflect upon ways that historically patriarchal approaches to traditional ethics, social and political philosophy, views about violence, war, and gender issues have kept hidden, or even dismissed, the centrality of fundamental relationships humans have with one another—a main contribution of feminist approaches to these areas. This volume takes an interdisciplinary approach to complex and persistent social and political problems and offers suggestions about how to consider, analyze, and find (...)
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  21.  19
    Nonviolence and Tolstoy’s Hard Question.Charles K. Fink - 2019 - The Acorn 17 (2):101-117.
    Pacifists are often put on the defensive with cases—real or imagined—in which innocent people are threatened by violent criminals. Is it always wrong to respond to violence with violence, even in defense of the innocent? This is the “hard” question addressed in this article. I argue that it is at least permissible to maintain one’s commitment to nonviolence in such cases. This may not seem like a bold conclusion, yet pacifists are often ridiculed—sometimes as cowards, sometimes as selfish moral purists—for (...)
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