The Acorn

ISSN: 1092-6534

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  1.  10
    A More Skillful Illusion.Will Barnes - 2023 - The Acorn 23 (1):7-36.
    In The Force of Nonviolence, Judith Butler argues that nonviolent movements must replace a dominant neurotic identitarianism with a commitment to preserving relational life. However, Butler also argues that because relationality is volatile, freedom and equality cannot be accomplished through a simple negation of separation. Instead, nonviolence must be directed at moments of relational volatility precisely when violence is compelled. Drawing on Klein’s theory of subjectivity—in which imagining ourselves as other is a precondition for imagining ourselves independent—and on Benjamin’s vision (...)
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  2.  5
    Celebrating and Augmenting Judith Butler’s Vital Contribution.Will Barnes - 2023 - The Acorn 23 (1):3-5.
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  3.  10
    The Moral Price of Preparedness.Ned Dobos, Graham Parsons, Kevin Cutright & Lee-Ann Chae - 2023 - The Acorn 23 (1):93-116.
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  4.  11
    The Truth of Nonviolence.Barry L. Gan - 2023 - The Acorn 23 (1):37-56.
    In The Force of Nonviolence, Judith Butler presents five key interventions to the field of nonviolence philosophy: (1) a critique of social contract theory for the way it imagines human beings as independent, (2) an approach to nonviolence based in the preservation of life within a context of social action, (3) the advancement of Butler’s alternative framework of equal grievability, (4) the claim that violence is difficult to define independently of social context, and (5) a Freudian analysis of the death (...)
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  5.  4
    Nonviolence as a Critique of Individualism in Butler and Gandhi.Capucine Mercier - 2023 - The Acorn 23 (1):57-73.
    In this article, I put Judith Butler’s thought of nonviolence in dialogue with that of M. K. Gandhi to show how, for both thinkers, a defense of nonviolence must be grounded in interdependency and equality, which consequently entails a displacement of the individual self and its interests as the focus of ethics. Although Butler’s and Gandhi’s accounts of nonviolence differ in some important respects, both base their defense of nonviolence on a recognition of interdependency in opposition to Western individualism. This (...)
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  6.  1
    Editor's Introduction.Greg Moses - 2023 - The Acorn 23 (1):1-2.
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  7.  8
    Is Judith Butler’s Rejection of Liberal Individualism Compatible with a Relational Understanding of Autonomy?Mariah Partida - 2023 - The Acorn 23 (1):75-91.
    This essay develops a renewed conception of autonomy through an explication of Judith Butler’s critique of liberal individualism in The Force of Nonviolence. I argue that while rejecting liberal individualism requires abandoning the fantasies of mastery and self-sufficiency, such a rejection need not imply a renunciation of autonomy. Instead, an ethics of nonviolence that is committed to equality demands a relational understanding of autonomy that affirms our radical interdependency. I contend, moreover, that for an account of the self to acknowledge (...)
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