Year:

  1.  4
    Autonomy, Sexuality, and Intellectual Disability.Andria Bianchi - 2016 - Social Philosophy Today 32:107-121.
    Respect for autonomy grounds common ethical judgments about why people should be allowed to make decisions for themselves. Under this assumption, it is concerning that a number of feminist conceptions of autonomy present challenges for people with intellectual disabilities. This paper explores some of the most philosophically influential feminist accounts of autonomy and demonstrates how these accounts exclude persons with intellectual disabilities. As a possible solution to these accounts, Laura Davy’s inclusive design approach is presented, which is a revised conception (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  8
    Equality of Opportunity, Disability, and Stigma.Jeffrey M. Brown - 2016 - Social Philosophy Today 32:175-181.
  3.  9
    Who Do We Think We Are?Lorraine Code - 2016 - Social Philosophy Today 32:29-44.
    This paper begins to develop a conception of ecological subjectivity and hence of social-political practice that can promote social justice across diverse populations and situations. It urges a provocative posing of the question “who do we think we are?” to direct attention to often unspoken assumptions about subjectivity and agency that tend silently to inform current philosophical inquiry. Drawing attention to the often-unconscious processes of “we-saying.” it aims to highlight and to prompt contestation of the silent assumptions that tend to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  2
    Why Can’T We Behave? Justice and Ethical Conduct in the Academy.Margaret Crouch - 2016 - Social Philosophy Today 32:7-26.
    The mantra of the Western philosopher is “know thyself.” However, many of us in the discipline of philosophy don’t seem to practice what we preach—or even preach this mantra. This is true in the conduct of our profession. The practices and norms of the members of an institution constitute that institution. If we are not rigorously self-examining ourselves, especially in the conduct of our professional lives, then the discipline of philosophy, the institution of philosophy as it exists in the West, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  1
    Why Can’T We Behave? Justice and Ethical Conduct in the Academy.Margaret Crouch - 2016 - Social Philosophy Today 32:7-26.
    The mantra of the Western philosopher is “know thyself.” However, many of us in the discipline of philosophy don’t seem to practice what we preach—or even preach this mantra. This is true in the conduct of our profession. The practices and norms of the members of an institution constitute that institution. If we are not rigorously self-examining ourselves, especially in the conduct of our professional lives, then the discipline of philosophy, the institution of philosophy as it exists in the West, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  2
    Fishkin’s Bottlenecks.Barry DeCoster - 2016 - Social Philosophy Today 32:183-188.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  1
    Bottlenecks, Disability, and Preference-Formation.Joseph Fishkin - 2016 - Social Philosophy Today 32:189-197.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Introduction.Jeffrey Gauthier - 2016 - Social Philosophy Today 32:1-4.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  2
    Equal Opportunity and Its Discontents.Jeffrey Gauthier - 2016 - Social Philosophy Today 32:169-174.
  10. Deviance to Diminish Educational Disparity.DeeDee Mower - 2016 - Social Philosophy Today 32:73-81.
    Using Michel Foucault’s framework of technologies can be a guide to understand how teachers become technological components that receive governance. Through this governance, pedagogical practices are perceived as similar yet may be vastly different. I utilize three of Foucault’s technologies to understand the differences in teacher practices. The first being governmental technologies, which are the rules and regulations that confine pedagogical practices. Second, the consumer technologies or the goods and services needed to sustain the rules that regulate pedagogy. Third is (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  3
    Doubts About Liberal Forms of Civic Education.Gordon B. Mower - 2016 - Social Philosophy Today 32:59-72.
    The liberal perspective entrusts to civic education the roles of combating declining numbers in national public participation and of closing the civic empowerment gap between privileged and under-privileged groups. Citizens equipped with rationality, on this view, will be able to see that participating in the public arena is a benefit to themselves and to the country. This paper critically examines this position, and finds that liberal forms of education suffer from three failings. First, people’s rationality is more likely to persuade (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  1
    A Tale of Two Hypocrisies.Michael Schleeter - 2016 - Social Philosophy Today 32:153-166.
    This essay represents an attempt to determine, first, whether or not the neoliberal principles and policies that have largely shaped the global economy over the past several decades in fact have their basis, as they are often thought to have, in classical political economy, particularly that of Adam Smith as it is developed in his Wealth of Nations, and, second, whether or not they in fact serve to promote, as they are often argued to do, the prosperity of individuals, particularly (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Learning as Learning How to Feel.Matt Silliman - 2016 - Social Philosophy Today 32:47-58.
    In this dialogue, Sir Isaac Newton and the Priestess Diotima of Mantinea engage current debates in the politics of education and their conceptual underpinnings. Diotima challenges the assumption that the acquisition of educational content or skills should dominate our concept of learning. She develops an alternative conception of education as fundamentally moral, interpersonal, and emotional, and thus prone to destruction in the face of the objectifying forces of high-stakes testing and a reductive audit culture. Lord Newton is skeptical of this (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. How Not to Think About Forgiveness.Matt Waldschlagel - 2016 - Social Philosophy Today 32:137-151.
    It is commonly held that the reason we ought to forgive those who wrong or harm us is to overcome the stranglehold that the vindictive passions or negative emotions have over us. On this common account, the driving reason to forgive someone else for the harm they have caused or the wrong they have done to us is to heal oneself. I find this account wrongheaded, as it runs the risk of treating forgiveness as a facile panacea which fails to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Objectivity as Neutrality, Nondisabled Ignorance, and Strong Objectivity in Biomedical Ethics.Christine Wieseler - 2016 - Social Philosophy Today 32:85-106.
    This paper focuses on epistemic practices within biomedical ethics that are related to disability. These practices are one of the reasons that there is tension between biomedical ethicists and disability advocates. I argue that appeals to conceptual neutrality regarding disability, which Anita Silvers recommends, are counterproductive. Objectivity as neutrality serves to obscure the social values and interests that inform epistemic practices. Drawing on feminist standpoint theory and epistemologies of ignorance, I examine ways that appeals to objectivity as neutrality serve to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  1
    The Primacy of Hope.Joan Woolfrey - 2016 - Social Philosophy Today 32:125-136.
    This paper raises the question of whether there is anything foundational to hopefulness when considering it as a virtue, and uses the Aristotelian distinction between virtue in the “natural sense” and virtue in the “strict sense” to make the claim that hopefulness has a primacy to it. While that primacy rests on the existence of care and responsiveness of community, those caretakers must themselves be possessed of hopefulness, which, at its best will be virtuous.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues