Social Philosophy Today

ISSN: 1543-4044

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  1.  3
    Introduction.Karen Adkins & Geoffrey Karabin - 2023 - Social Philosophy Today 39:1-6.
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  2.  58
    Misinformation and Epistemic Harm.Brandon Carey - 2023 - Social Philosophy Today 39:89-100.
    Standard accounts of misinformation require that it is either false or misleading, in the sense that it leads people to false beliefs. But many examples of misinformation involve true information that leads people to true beliefs. So, I propose a new theory of misinformation: misinformation is information that is epistemically harmful in the sense that it is disposed to reduce the overall quality of a subject’s epistemic position. This includes not only causing the subject to form a false belief, but (...)
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  3.  8
    In Hopes of "Getting Our Act Together".Shannon Fyfe - 2023 - Social Philosophy Today 39:203-206.
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  4.  7
    Summary of Getting our Act Together: A Theory of Collective Moral Obligations.Shannon Fyfe - 2023 - Social Philosophy Today 39:199-202.
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  5.  26
    Black Trust and White Allies: Insights from Slave Narratives.Kevin M. Graham, Anaja Arthur, Ali Griswold, Beau Kearns, Quinlyn Klade, Maddox Larson & Suraya Wayne - 2023 - Social Philosophy Today 39:183-195.
    In this article, we explore two related questions. First, under what conditions, if any, can a Black person trust a white person to be a reliable ally in the context of a society founded on racial slavery? Second, under what conditions, if any, can a Black person trust a white person to be a reliable ally in the context of a white supremacist society? We follow Karen Jones and Nancy Nyquist Potter in arguing that allies must not only be competent, (...)
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  6.  20
    Demanding Apology, Demanding Forgiveness.Johanna C. Luttrell - 2023 - Social Philosophy Today 39:165-182.
    American media is very quick to ask victims of anti-Black violence if they forgive their victimizers. The media’s nearly reflexive framing is a symptom of the broader, cultural demand that Black victims grant forgiveness for racist violence. Reading Juliet Hooker and Myisha Cherry, this paper links the current preponderance of such demand for forgiveness to a demand for apology in America’s lynching tradition. Drawing from Sonya Renee Taylor, Ida B. Wells, and Frederick Douglass, I give a history to both kinds (...)
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  7.  11
    Individualism and Morality.William McBride - 2023 - Social Philosophy Today 39:207-209.
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  8. Situating Cancel Culture.Lara Millman - 2023 - Social Philosophy Today 39:119-137.
    Many view cancellation as a method for holding influential personalities accountable for bad behavior, while others think cancelling amounts to censorship and bullying. I hold that neither of these accounts are worth pursuing, especially if the aim is social progress. In this paper, I offer a situated account of cancellation and cancel culture, locating the phenomenon in our exclusionary history while examining the social dynamics of belief. When we situate cancel culture, we can see how problematic instances of cancelling are (...)
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  9.  6
    Collective Moral Obligations.Randall C. Morris - 2023 - Social Philosophy Today 39:211-214.
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  10. Hostile Epistemology.C. Thi Nguyen - 2023 - Social Philosophy Today 39:9-32.
    Hostile epistemology is the study of how environmental features exploit our cognitive vulnerabilities. I am particularly interested in those vulnerabilities arise from the basic character of our epistemic lives. We are finite beings with limited cognitive resources, perpetually forced to reasoning a rush. I focus on two sources of unavoidable vulnerability. First, we need to use cognitive shortcuts and heuristics to manage our limited time and attention. But hostile forces can always game the gap between the heuristic and the ideal. (...)
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  11.  4
    Caring Affinity Networks.Shaun Respess - 2023 - Social Philosophy Today 39:51-69.
    The medicalization of mental health remains a point of contention for bioethicists, especially as it concerns the epistemic capabilities of those diagnosed with an illness or disorder. Gosselin (2019) argues that biomedicalization commits epistemic injustices against these persons and consequently entraps them in a “cycle of vulnerability”; in response, she proposes principles of justice to defend them from such affronts. This paper builds off of her work and responds particularly to the demand for a “sociocentric view of the self as (...)
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  12. Commentary for NASSP Award Symposium on 'Getting Our Act Together'.Anne Schwenkenbecher - 2023 - Social Philosophy Today 39:215-226.
    This commentary is part of a symposium on my book 'Getting Our Act Together: A Theory of Collective Moral Obligations' (Routledge, 2021). Here, I respond to the members of the North American Society for Social Philosophy’s 2022 Book Award Committee. I discuss whether most moral theory is individualistic, arguing that “traditional ethical theories” - meaning the traditions of Virtue Ethics, Kantian ethics as well as consequentialist ethics - certainly are. All of these focus on what individual agents ought to do (...)
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  13.  49
    Democratic Empathy and Affective Polarization.Katharina Anna Sodoma & Daniel Sharp - 2023 - Social Philosophy Today 39:71-87.
    Social scientists have observed a sharp rise in affective polar­ization in many societies, particularly the United States. Since it is widely agreed that this poses a threat to democracy, finding solutions to this predicament is essential. One prominent proposal to depolarize the electorate holds that citizens need to exercise their capacities for empathy with the political opposition. However, defenders of the empathy response to affective polarization have yet to fully specify the range of mechanisms through which empathy can counteract polarization. (...)
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  14.  21
    Beauvoir, Irigaray, and #Me Too.Mary Townsend - 2023 - Social Philosophy Today 39:35-50.
    Simone de Beauvoir remarks that women have trouble articulating a “we” together; this foible of language is connected to our unwillingness to claim our subjectivity, and to our ability to say “I” in ordinary conversation. The corresponding political difficulty is that the “we” of a non-exclusionary women’s solidarity and revolution seems almost impossible to imagine. Luce Irigaray’s paradigm of between-women-talk, best designated as talk amongst women and non-cis-men, offers a way of reforming the language required: a Platonic participation where desire (...)
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  15.  20
    Reproductive Justice as Reparative Justice.Desiree Valentine - 2023 - Social Philosophy Today 39:101-118.
    While the principles of reproductive justice are generally agreed upon in progressive reproductive political circles, other theoretical frameworks such as reparative justice can further foster the goals of the movement. In the literature, however, reparative justice has been insufficiently explored as it relates to reproductive injustice. My concern in this essay is therefore the development of conceptual architecture for understanding reproductive justice as reparative in nature. A reparative approach to reproductive ethics importantly takes up the demand to situate reproduction within (...)
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  16.  11
    Our Problem Isn’t Polarization—It’s Sectarianism.Tony White - 2023 - Social Philosophy Today 39:139-163.
    A common analysis of current U.S. politics identifies the main problem as ideological polarization leading to government dysfunction, and moderation as the main solution. But drawing from Martin Luther King Jr., I contend that the main problem is sectarianism or us-them thinking, leading to injustice, and the main solution a social movement of love and justice. Notably, while many call for deemphasizing ideas, my solution calls for more emphasis on ideas. The purpose of government is justice. The moderation solution, although (...)
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