Year:

  1. The Mass Psychology of Classroom Discourse.David I. Backer - 2017 - Educational Theory 67 (1):67-82.
    In a majority of cases observed in classrooms over the last several decades, what has gone by the name “discussion” is not discussion, but rather an interaction better known as recitation. If one sees this phenomenon as a problem, then an aspect of its resolution must be theoretical : What series of conceptual terms might we adopt such that recitation does not pass for discussion? Such a theoretical response would have to address internal and external, or subjective and intersubjective, phenomena (...)
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  2. Mrs. Klein and Paulo Freire: Coda for the Pain of Symbolization in the Lifeworld of the Mind.Deborah P. Britzman - 2017 - Educational Theory 67 (1):83-95.
    The preceding symposium articles speculate on the psychosocial dynamics of discrimination as reverberating with grief, mourning, melancholia, and denial. They invite a psychoanalytic paradox on the fate of inchoate loss and its complex relation to oppression and depression: constellations of attachment to loss met with its social and psychical disavowal render inexpressible to the other the work of mourning and drive its myriad expressions. A different way of putting the dilemma is that grief calls upon symbolic equation and the pain (...)
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  3. Among School Teachers: Bearing Witness as an Orientation in Educational Inquiry.David T. Hansen - 2017 - Educational Theory 67 (1):9-30.
    In this writing, David Hansen illuminates the aesthetic, moral, and epistemic meaning of bearing witness to teaching and teachers by drawing upon a recently completed field-based endeavor that included extensive school visits. Hansen shows how bearing witness can bring the inquirer close to the truth of teaching. However, the witness must undertake ethical work to ready her- or himself for the task. Even such readiness, which must be continuously re-won on each occasion, guarantees nothing. The witness in the classroom must (...)
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  4. Systems Theory for Pragmatic Schooling: Toward Principles of Democratic Education.Richard Quantz & Deron Boyles - 2017 - Educational Theory 67 (1):107-115.
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  5. “Coerced Loss and Ambivalent Preservation”: Racial Melancholia in American Born Chinese.Sophia Tatiana Sarigianides - 2017 - Educational Theory 67 (1):37-49.
    Recent applications of Freud's theory examine the social value of the lost love object as a way of understanding the suffering of non-majority groups. Rather than pathologizing the individual suffering the loss, the lens of racial melancholia pathologizes the discourse that constitutes racially marked others as alien to the majority. Through a close reading of image and text, Sophia Tatiana Sarigianides applies David Eng and Shinhee Han's theory of racial melancholia to Gene Luen Yang's graphic novel American Born Chinese. Sarigianides (...)
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  6. On the Unmourned Losses of Educational Growth: An Introduction.James Stillwaggon - 2017 - Educational Theory 67 (1):31-36.
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  7. “A Fantasy of Untouchable Fullness”: Melancholia and Resistance to Educational Transformation.James Stillwaggon - 2017 - Educational Theory 67 (1):51-66.
    The progressive language of growth and development that informs our shared ideal of the educated subject also informs the curricular structure of schooling, in which new learning builds upon established knowledge and students' development depends upon their desire to take on those identities associated with various achievements of knowledge. Each re-creation of the student's identity requires a new production of the student's former identity as an uneducated self — a negative statement of the self-overcome, fashioned in the language of the (...)
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  8. Death by Numbers: A Response to Backer, Sarigianides, and Stillwaggon.Peter Taubman - 2017 - Educational Theory 67 (1):97-106.
    In this response essay, Peter Taubman considers the relationship between melancholia and Freud's notion of a death drive. Taubman explores how audit culture sustains melancholia and intensifies the death drive, ultimately deadening our psyches by erasing memory, disparaging feelings, shutting down thought, and ignoring history. Taubman concludes with a suggestion that educators once again integrate discussions of Eros, or love, in their approaches to curriculum and teaching.
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