Year:

  1. Friedrich Von Hügel's philosophy.Christopher Adair-Toteff - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (7):1079-1093.
    ABSTRACT Friedrich von Hügel is justifiably regarded as one of the leading philosophers of religion of the twentieth century. He was born of a German- Austrian father and a Scottish mother and spent most of his life in England. He was fluent in four languages and corresponded with scholars from a half dozen European countries. Educated at home he became a famous philosopher and was granted honorary degrees from St. Andrews and Oxford and was chosen to give the Gifford Lectures. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. James Fitzjames Stephen's Other Enemies: Catholicism and Positivism in Liberty, Equality, Fraternity and Beyond.Gregory Conti - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (7):1109-1149.
    ABSTRACT As the most famous critic of John Stuart Mill, James Fitzjames Stephen has often been assumed to have been a religious conservative or even reactionary. In contrast to these assessments, this article shows that Stephen's most consistent enemies were what he took to be the two most significant religious forces of the modern world: Ultramontane Catholicism and Comtean Positivism. The article explores his objections to these two religious ideologies, which he saw as sharing certain harmful features. It then shows (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Spinoza Against Political Tacitism: Reversing the Meaning of Tacitus’ Quotes.Marta Libertà De Bastiani - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (7):1043-1060.
    ABSTRACT The aim of this paper is to investigate the intertextual relationship between Spinoza and Tacitus in the Political Treatise, underlining how Spinoza uses Tacitus’ quotes against his main political enemy: Tacitism. I will show that Spinoza’s use of Tacitus is very selective and can be aptly characterized as a twofold political use: Tacitus’ quotes shape Spinoza’s political insights, but they are also used to confront Tacitism. To develop this twofold reading, after a brief introduction, I will consider Tacitus’ reception (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. The Mind’s Magic Lantern: David Brewster and the Scientific Imagination.Bill Jenkins - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (7):1094-1108.
    ABSTRACT The imagination has always been thought to operate primarily in conjunction with the sense of vision, imagined objects and scenes being conjured up before the ‘mind’s eye’. In early nineteenth-century Scotland the natural philosopher David Brewster developed a theory of the imagination that explained its operation through a reversal of the normal processes of visual perception. These ideas were rooted in the mental philosophy of the eighteenth-century Scottish Enlightenment. For Brewster the mind’s eye was also the eye of the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  2
    The Paradoxical Coexistence Between Free Trade Ideology and Economic Nationalism Within Left Liberals in Britain. The International Economic Thought of J. A. Hobson and J. M. Keynes. [REVIEW]Tomoari Matsunaga - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (7):1150-1168.
    ABSTRACT This paper presents a new perspective on British free traders’ economic thought in the first half of the twentieth century. Former studies have exclusively focused on the aspect of consumerism and idealistic internationalism as the characteristics of British free trade ideology. In so doing, they have overlooked another important aspect of British free traders’ thought. That is, especially within the tradition of left-leaning liberals or New Liberals, the discourse of producerism and a kind of economic nationalism emphasising the home (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  1
    Adam Smith’s Genealogy of Religion.Paul Sagar - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (7):1061-1078.
    ABSTRACT This paper has three main aims. First, to make good on recent suggestions that Adam Smith offers a genealogy of the origins of religious belief. This is done by offering a systematic reconstruction of his account of religion in The Theory of Moral Sentiments, demonstrating that Smith there offers a naturalised account of religious belief, whilst studiously avoiding committing himself to the truth of any such belief. Second, I seek to bring out that Smith was ultimately less interested in (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Little Room for Exceptions: On Misunderstanding Carl Schmitt.Andrea Salvatore & Mariano Croce - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (7):1169-1183.
    ABSTRACT Carl Schmitt is generally considered as the father of exceptionalism – the theory that the heart of politics lies in the sovereign power to issue emergency measures that suspend everyday normality. This is why his name comes up anytime state governments, whether liberal or not, impose limits on constitutional rights and freedoms to cope with emergencies. This article problematises such a received understanding. It argues that Schmitt held an exceptionalist view for a limited period of time and that even (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Unsocial Sociability: Montesquieu, Œuvres Complètes, Volume 20. Correspondance, Vol. III, Edited by Philip Stewart and Catherine Volpilhac-Auger, with Caroline Verdier, Jens Häseler, Nadezda Plavinskaia and Jean-Pierre Poussou, Lyon and Paris, ENS Editions & Classiques Garnier, 2021, Xxi+624 Pp., ISBN 979-10-362-0058-8 & 978-2-406-09933-8. [REVIEW]Michael Sonenscher - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (7):1184-1188.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  1
    The Forgotten Past: Nikolay Milkov on the History of Analytic Philosophy: Early Analytic Philosophy and the German Philosophical Tradition, by Nikolay Milkov, New York and London, Bloomsbury, 2020, X + 284 Pp., £76.50 (Hardcover) ISBN 978-1-3500-8643-2. [REVIEW]Adam Tamas Tuboly - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (7):1188-1192.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. On the Musically Melancholic: Temporality and Affects in Western Music History.Yonatan Bar-Yoshafat - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (6):918-938.
    ABSTRACT Music’s power to express and arouse feelings has been one of its principal attributes from antiquity. While the topic remains prevalent in contemporary discourse, relatively little attention had been given to specifically melancholic expressions in European music. The article examines various stages in western music history vis-à-vis the changing formulations and receptions of melancholy as a cultural phenomenon, from the time it was perceived as a sign of either a physical or a moral problem to later historical periods, when (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Le Spleen de Paris: Facets of Melancholy in the Lyrics of Baudelaire.Nastasja S. Dresler - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (6):987-1007.
    ABSTRACT The traditional conception of the link between Melancholia and a creative disposition finds its climax in the artistic-literary environment of France in the nineteenth century in Baudelaire’s poetry: he illustrates this paradigm by praising Spleen and Idéal, depicting the interplay of sweetness and bitterness as a specific and aesthetic principle that his ‘sickly flowers’ are based on. But the mental gloom of the spleen can also have its paralyzing shadows. How spleen, ennui and melancholia behave to each other and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  12
    Cartesian Masks: Sadness, Doubt, and the Initiation to Philosophy.Adi Efal-Lautenschläger - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (6):887-900.
    ABSTRACT Focused upon Descartes’ writings and letters, this paper considers the exponentially-charged relationship between sadness, melancholy, doubt and philosophical inquiry. The first sections examine the relation between sadness in the Cartesian corpus and melancholy as a traditional pathological classification, with both set against a larger seventeenth century intellectual discourse. The letters exchanged between the Princess Elisabeth of Bohemia and the Palatine and Descartes between 1643 and 1649, that is, just prior to the death of the philosopher in 1650, reveal the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  6
    Melancholy Cosmopolitanism: Reflections on a Genre of European Literary Fiction.Ian Ellison - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (6):1022-1037.
    ABSTRACT This essay considers how various European novels written and published around the turn of the millennium may be grouped together as an historically and geographically contingent literary genre, while also reflecting on the implications of this. In doing so, this essay coins the term ‘melancholy cosmopolitanism’ to best describe this genre of literary works. Ultimately, this genre suggests, first of all, that the sense of melancholy obsolescence articulated by European writers at this time is not confined to discrete national (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Thick Blood, Satan’s Burning Arrows and the Dungeon of Self-Will: Melancholia in the Observationes of the Radical Pietist Physician Johann Christian Senckenberg.Vera Fasshauer - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (6):939-957.
    ABSTRACT When melancholy is mentioned in connection with pietism, it is usually associated with self-ordained contrition and castigation which, according to the opponents of this religious movement, is prone to drive the believers into pathological dejection or even suicide. The example of the radical pietist Frankfurt physician Johann Christian Senckenberg, however, demonstrates the need for a more differentiated approach. As Senckenberg attained his medical knowledge primarily through physical and mental self-observation, he experienced the sadness of his own soul as absence (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Melancholy, Gender, and Genius in the Art of Thomas Eakins.Debra W. Hanson - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (6):974-986.
    ABSTRACT This essay analyses the visual representation of melancholy and related themes in the work of American artist Thomas Eakins. Its particular focus is Home Scene, an intimate portrait of two of the artist’s sisters in the parlour of their family home in Philadelphia. Through a close examination of Home Scene in relation to later portraits by and of the artist, my analysis sheds new light on how and why Eakins reshaped ideations of melancholy based in European art and intellectual (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  1
    When the Bile Turns Black: On the Origins of Melancholy.Jonas Holst - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (6):839-849.
    ABSTRACT The paper delves into the origins of the ancient Greek concept of melancholy. The purpose of the first part is to trace a precursor of melancholy back to Homer’s description of certain emotions which are congenial with rage, and which are associated with the colour black. Based on a systematic interpretation of these traces of melancholy in the earliest premedical history, the second part of the paper will shed new light on the broader and more dynamic way in which (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. The Supportive Voice in the Midst of Solitude and Melancholy: Volney’s Génie des Tombeaux Et des Ruines.Gerhard Katschnig - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (6):958-973.
    ABSTRACT The article treats the universal history Ruins, or Meditation on the Revolutions of Empires of the French cultural philosopher Constantin-François Volney. Using a textual, interdisciplinary study, which focuses upon Volney’s complex cultural and historical philosophical contexts, I demonstrate that his primary concern was a nearly 2500 years coherent Europe of tradition and reception: this Europe did not represent a western corner of a larger Asian landmass but, in the late eighteenth century, rather offered the opportunity for a complex and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Conservatism: The Fight for a Tradition: By Edmund Fawcett, Princeton, NJ, Princeton University Press, 2020, 544 Pp., £30.00/$35.00 (Hardback), ISBN 9780691174105. [REVIEW]R. J. W. Mills - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (6):1040-1042.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Melancholy and its Sisters: Transformations of a Concept From Homer to Lars von Trier.John Raimo & Dominic E. Delarue - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (6):817-838.
    ABSTRACT This introduction argues for competing diachronic and synchronic accounts of melancholy in European and American culture. Taking the pioneering and yet belated work Saturn and Melancholy of Erwin Panofsky, Fritz Saxl, and Raymond Klibansky as its starting point, this article situates melancholy as at once its own, often local and non-specialist discourse as well as a conceptual web binding together medical, artistic, and social innovations, competitions, and turmoil. As a subject, melancholy demands interdisciplinary study, as Dürer’s print Melencolia I (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Terrorists, Anarchists, and Republicans: The Genevans and the Irish in Times of Revolution: By Richard Whatmore, Princeton, NJ, Princeton University Press, 2019, 512 Pp., $39.95/£34.00 (Hardback), ISBN 9780691168777. [REVIEW]Paul Sagar - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (6):1038-1040.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. The Self-Assured Silence: A Subtle Distance Between Acedia and Melancholy in Pieter de Codde’s Portrait of a Young Man.Pablo Schneider - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (6):871-886.
    ABSTRACT Circa 1630, the Dutch painter Pieter Jakobsz Codde, created a painting that shows little more than a young man sitting in a chair. Yet an in-depth examination of the person, the design of the space and the objects located in the room reveal that different aspects of disturbances and tensions have been integrated into the presentation and open a discourse on the imagery of melancholy and acedia. The paper shows by way of example that this is not an iconographic (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. The Devil Behind the Eyes: Melancholy, Imagination, and Ghosts in Post-Reformation Switzerland.Eveline Szarka - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (6):901-917.
    ABSTRACT The Protestant Reformation in the sixteenth century fuelled heated debates about the nature and perception of spirits appearing to people. According to Protestant theology, apparitions of spirits were not souls of the dead but either diabolical illusions, natural phenomena, or ‘mere fantasies’ of a deluded mind. Swiss church minister Louis Lavater emphasized that particularly melancholic people were prone to devilish deceits and thus inclined to imagine ghosts and other spirits. This paper traces the close connection between early modern concepts (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. A Solar History of Acedia in the Latin Middle Ages and its Intersection with Melancholy in Henry Suso.Jeremy C. Thompson - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (6):850-870.
    ABSTRACT The midday demon, who attacked the solitary monk with vicious temptations – above all, that of acedia – is a conventional motif in late antique and medieval ascetic literature. At the noon hour, the demonic assault was vigorous and ranging. But medieval spiritual writers like Bernard of Clairvaux and Richard of Saint Victor also described noontime as the high point of mystical experience. Both notions hark back to biblical statements made in the Psalms and Song of Songs and were (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. The Wings of Melancholy, Or: A Life on the Border: On the Relevance of Melancholy and Apocalypse in Art and Contemporary Society.Sajda van der Leeuw - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (6):1008-1021.
    ABSTRACT This paper argues for the contemporary relevance of melancholy as something different than depression or a state of mental illness. Instead, through examples of a literary, philosophical, and artistic nature, it is shown that melancholy functions as a force-field – a topos where the finite and the infinite, the earthly and the heavenly, the physical and the spiritual come together and meet in huge tension. By means of an exploration of the historical notion of melancholy and a revisit of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  2
    The Europe of Jean Monnet: The Road to Functionalism.Claudio Giulio Anta - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (5):773-784.
    ABSTRACT Jean Monnet was the inventor of the community method; by placing economic integration before the political one, he reversed the criteria of unification that had characterised the development of nation-states in the Old Continent. He was never a government or party leader; despite this, he engaged on an equal footing with the most prestigious statesmen of the twentieth century, influencing their choices: from Viviani in 1914 to Giscard d’Estaing in 1975, passing through Schuman, Spaak, De Gasperi, Adenauer and Kennedy. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26.  2
    Montesquieu’s Dur-Commerce Thesis.Timothy Brennan - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (5):698-712.
    ABSTRACT This essay seeks to clarify a facet of Montesquieu’s doux-commerce thesis. On the one hand, I agree with the scholarly consensus that Montesquieu was a doux-commerce thinker. Indeed, I argue that from the Persian Letters to The Spirit of the Laws he consistently presented self-interest as a psychological spring of action superior in point of humanity to virtue. On the other hand, I contend that he went out of his way to show that commercial regimes need not be characterized (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  1
    Modern Statelessness and the British Imperial Perspective. A Comment on Mira Siegelberg’s Statelessness: A Modern History. [REVIEW]Sara Cosemans - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (5):801-808.
    ABSTRACT If the link between territories and people get severed, what is the role of international law and the international community? In Statelessness. A Modern History, Mira Siegelberg guides the reader through the answers jurists, philosophers, and diplomats have given to that question since the nineteenth century. Siegelberg is less interested in the question why the postwar arrangement failed so miserably in its plea to reduce statelessness than in the architecture of international law and its role in the debate about (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  2
    Review of Time’s Monster: History, Conscience, and Britain’s Empire: By Priya Satia, London, Allen Lane, 2020, 384 Pages, £25 (Hardback), ISBN: 9780241464120. [REVIEW]Morgan Golf-French - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (5):812-816.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  3
    Transitioning Culture From Apparent Death to Reawakening: Alberto Asor Rosa’s Political Conceptions in the 1960s.Fabio Guidali - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (5):785-800.
    ABSTRACT The article deals with the early career of the literary critic Alberto Asor Rosa, one of the founders of the operaismo movement, a Marxist tendency advocating the management of factories by workers through bottom-up councils. It outlines the role he assigned to literature and culture, investigating his criticism first against the non-revolutionary cultural politics of the Italian Communist Party, notoriously through his book Scrittori e popolo and his writings for the periodical classe operaia, then identifying a transition from a (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  2
    The Persistence of Party: Ideas of Harmonious Discord in Eighteenth-Century Britain: By Max Skjönsberg, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2021, Xv + 373 Pp., £75 Hb, ISBN 978-1-108-84163-4. [REVIEW]James A. Harris - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (5):809-811.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31.  2
    The Idea of Religion and Sacrifice From Grotius to Diderot’s Encyclopédie.Girolamo Imbruglia - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (5):680-697.
    ABSTRACT This article outlines the concept of the early modern idea of religion through the notion of sacrifice, from Socinus on through Grotius and Spinoza to Diderot’s Encyclopedia. It is generally held that the philosophical representation of religion of the seventeenth century ‘set the stage’ for later Enlightenment philosophers. My argument runs in a different direction. I intend to show that the Enlightenment philosophers’ concept of religious history stemmed not only from the philosophical tradition, but also from their knowledge of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  1
    Edward Hart: Bricklayer, Theologian and Nonjuring Martyr.Simon Lewis - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (5):664-679.
    ABSTRACT This paper explores the neglected manuscripts and publications of Edward Hart, an early eighteenth-century Nonjuring bricklayer, whose determination to promote his cause ultimately led to his death. By discussing Hart’s support for High Church doctrines, such as the apostolic succession and non-resistance, this study challenges traditional historiographical associations between artisan theology and ‘radical’ anticlericalism, while also illuminating the fundamental role played by the Nonjuring laity in the dissemination of conservative politico-theological ideas. Moreover, by discussing Hart’s defence of Anglican ‘orthodoxy’, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33.  3
    Adam Smith: By Craig Smith, Cambridge, Polity, 2020, Viii, 210 Pp., £16.99 (Paperback), £55 (Hardback), ISBN 9781509518234. [REVIEW]R. J. W. Mills - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (5):811-812.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  2
    Lamennais’s sensibility.Roberto Romani - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (5):713-731.
    ABSTRACT This article deals with the most important points of contact between feeling and cognition in the thought of Félicité de Lamennais. The following arguments are focused on: i. the central role of love; ii. the advocacy of self-denial, taking the shape of a denunciation of earthly pleasures and passions, especially pride; iii. a failure to endorse moral pluralism; iv. the necessity for people to fulfil their ‘duties’; v. a view of the post-revolutionary phase as fateful; and vi. a tendency (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  1
    Huizinga’s ‘Heimwee’: Responding to Burckhardt’s ‘Die Kultur der Renaissance in Italien’ in Times of Loss.Thor Rydin - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (5):732-747.
    ABSTRACT This article offers a new interpretation of the historical relation between two foundational works in cultural history: Johan Huizinga’s ‘The Autumntide of the Middle Ages’ and Jacob Burckhardt’s ‘The Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy’. The tension between these works has commonly been understood as a scholarly dispute over the proper historical periodization of European fifteenth-century cultural practices: whilst Burckhardt reconstructed his material in terms of its technical novelty, its ability to ‘create’ a post-medieval world, Huizinga emphasized how fifteenth-century (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  1
    Mobilizing the Western Tradition for Present Politics: Carl Schmitt’s Polemical Uses of Roman Law, 1923–1945.Ville Suuronen - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (5):748-772.
    ABSTRACT This article offers a new reading of Carl Schmitt and his Nazi engagement by chronologically examining the changing uses of Roman law in his Weimar and Nazi thought. I argue that Schmitt’s different ways of narrating the modern reception of Roman law disclose, first, the Nazification of his thought in the spring of 1933, and second, the partial and apologetic de-Nazification of his thinking in the 1940s. While Schmitt’s Weimar-era works are defined by a positive use of Roman imagery, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  6
    ‘The Heat of a Feaver’: Francis Bacon on Civil War, Sedition, and Rebellion.Samuel G. Zeitlin - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (5):643-663.
    ABSTRACT This article contrasts Francis Bacon’s understanding of civil war, sedition, and rebellion with that of his near contemporaries and predecessors, especially Montaigne, Bodin, Machiavelli, Alberico Gentili and Edward Forset. The article contends that for Bacon, civil war, sedition, and rebellion are the antitheses of good government and that which prudent policy aims to avoid. The article further argues that for Bacon as sedition and its extremities are caused by poverty and discontentment, and these, in Bacon’s view, are the result (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38.  3
    ‘War to War!’: The Pacifist Propaganda of Coenobium.Claudio Giulio Anta - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (4):591-603.
    ABSTRACT Amongst the Italian exiles who arrived at the Canton of Ticino following repression perpetrated by the Di Rudinì and Pelloux administrations – after the popular uprisings of 1898 – are Enrico Bignami, Giuseppe Rensi and Arcangelo Ghisleri, who, in Lugano, created a sort of secular symposium for fostering spiritual values. This gave birth to Coenobium, the ‘international journal of independent studies’, which remained in operation between 1906 and 1919. This periodical distinguished itself due to the diversity of the issues (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  8
    Arendt's Idea of the University.Gent Carrabregu - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (4):604-634.
    ABSTRACT This article offers the first comprehensive reconstruction of Hannah Arendt's contribution to the venerable chapter of modern intellectual history known as ‘the Idea of the university.’ Arendt first jotted down her thoughts on this topic in a 1946 letter to Karl Jaspers, in response to the manuscript of his then forthcoming book Die Idee der Universität. She later revisited the topic in three different moments. We trace these three sequels back to three contemporary political crises to which she bore (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  1
    ‘No More Occasion for Puffendorf nor Hugo Grotius’: The Spanish Rights of Possession in America and the Darien Venture.Giovanni Lista - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (4):543-560.
    ABSTRACT Set within the framework of international intellectual history, the present article focusses on the propaganda campaign undertaken by the Company of Scotland to prove the legality of its settlement in the Darien province. It first shows how a group of Scottish authors appropriated sixteenth-century natural law arguments from Spanish sources to reject the claims based on the Bulls of Donation and conquest, which underpinned Spain’s sovereignty over its American territories. Acting individually and collectively, anonymously and under pseudonyms, pro-Darien propagandists (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41.  2
    The Tawdry Tale of Marx’s Illegitimate Son: New Evidence Uncovered in the History of a Lost Letter.Peter Madill - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (4):584-590.
    ABSTRACT This article draws attention to a neglected aside in the debate over whether Marx fathered an illegitimate child. In 1898, Louise Freyberger wrote a controversial letter in which she claimed Engels had confessed on his deathbed that Frederick Demuth was Marx’s son. The letter, however, only came to light in 1962 when Werner Blumenberg first discussed it in his biography of Marx. Blumenberg’s revelation provoked an on-going debate over the plausibility of Freyberger’s allegations. Several scholars went so far as (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  2
    On the Power of Natural Reason: A Transcript and Commentary of Two Letters From John Simson to Archibald Campbell in 1736.Christian Maurer - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (4):561-572.
    ABSTRACT This article presents two letters from the Glaswegian theologian John Simson to his former student Archibald Campbell, professor of ecclesiastical history at St. Andrews as of 1733. After Simson’s condemnation for heresy in 1727–1728, Simson was in regular contact with Campbell, who also came to be scrutinised by a Committee for Purity of Doctrine in 1735–1736. The two letters by Simson address Campbell’s claim that without the support of divine revelation, natural reason is unable to discover any essential religious (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  1
    The ‘System of Natural Liberty’: Natural Order in the Wealth of Nations.Keith Tribe - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (4):573-583.
    ABSTRACT It has long been recognised that Adam Smith’s Wealth of Nations advances a ‘system of natural liberty’ in seeking to account for the ‘nature and causes of the wealth of nations.’ This is not however a theme that is explored or explained in the early sections of the book; in fact, not until Book IV, Ch. ix does Smith give his most expansive account of what he might mean by this term. This paper examines this chapter in detail to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  1
    The Hammer of the Populists. Hugo Drochon’s Nietzsche’s Great Politics. [REVIEW]Damian Valdez - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (4):635-641.
    ABSTRACT Nietzsche’s Great Politics by Hugo Drochon is one of the most creative and original efforts to mould Nietzsche’s thought to the challenges of our age. Nietzsche always wanted to have creative and critical readers and this book certainly lives up to that ideal. In highlighting some intruiging possibilities in Nietzsche’s text, the author blunts much of the “aristocratic radicalism” often attributed to Nietzsche, playing down the more visceral reading of his references to slavery and hierarchy. This approach has both (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  5
    Kierkegaard on the Transformative Power of Art.Antony Aumann - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (3):429-442.
    ABSTRACT Kierkegaard seeks to inspire transformations. His aim is to get us to devote our lives to God or the Good rather than our own personal enjoyment – to abandon the aesthetic life in favour of the ethical or religious one. Drawing on Laurie Paul and Agnes Callard’s recent work, I maintain that two obstacles stand in Kierkegaard’s way. First, transformations involve adopting a new perspective on the world, one we cannot fully grasp ahead of time. Second, transformations also involve (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  1
    Imaginary Construction and Lessons in Living Forward.Viktoras Bachmetjevas - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (3):470-483.
    ABSTRACT It is commonly argued that Kierkegaard’s famous observation that life can be understood backward, but must be lived forward excludes the possibility of intellectual preparation to life. This article suggests the view that, while it is not the case that Kierkegaard has an elaborate vision of thinking about the possibilities of life one faces, he engages the notion of imaginary construction [experimentere] to propose existential prototypes for mental exploration that prepare us for life lived forward. It is concluded that (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  5
    Kierkegaard on Imagination: Possibility, Hope, and the Imitation of Christ.Hjördis Becker-Lindenthal - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (3):484-499.
    ABSTRACT What happens to the imagination in the process of overturning despair and becoming an authentic self? Using the mystic concept of Entbildung as heuristics, the article re-examines the relation of the imagination and the will in Kierkegaard. Analysing the rarely compared texts Practice in Christianity and the first of the Ethical-Religious Essay, and paying close attention to the semantics of the image, the article argues that grace and imagination cooperate in the process of Entbildung, restoring the self’s receptivity for (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. The Sublime in the Pedestrian: Figures of the Incognito in Fear and Trembling.Martijn Boven - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (3):500-513.
    This article demonstrates a novel conceptualization of sublimity: the sublime in the pedestrian. This pedestrian mode of sublimity is exemplified by the Biblical Abraham, the central figure of Kierkegaard’s pseudonymous Fear and Trembling. It is rooted in the analysis of one of the foundational stories of the three monotheistic religions: Abraham’s averted sacrifice of his son Isaac. The defining feature of this new, pedestrian mode of sublimity is that is remains hidden behind what I call a total incognito. It is (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  49.  5
    Existentialists or Mystics. Kierkegaard and Murdoch on Imagination and Fantasy in Ethical Life.Rob Compaijen - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (3):443-455.
    ABSTRACT In this paper I explore the role of imagination in ethical life. I do so by discussing the thought of Kierkegaard and Murdoch, both of whom stress the importance as well as the dangerousness of imagination for ethical life. Both distinguish between proper imagination and mere fantasy in dealing with the tension. Anti-Climacus’s views on imagination emphasize that the proper use of the imagination plays a vital role in realizing the fundamental ethical task of becoming ourselves, whereas fantasy only (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  6
    A World Without Imagination? Consequences of Aphantasia for an Existential Account of Self.Mélissa Fox-Muraton - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (3):414-428.
    ABSTRACT Aphantasia is a spectrum disorder, affecting the ability of otherwise healthy individuals to form voluntary or conscious mental images, and in some cases also any form of sensory representation. Although only discovered in 2010, it is now estimated that 2–3% of the population may have aphantasia – otherwise termed, the absence of a ‘mind’s eye,’ that aspect of conscious experience which so many people take for granted as part of their general way of experiencing the world. Aphantasia, although it (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  51.  1
    After Actuality: Ideality and the Promise of a Purified Religious Vision in Frater Taciturnus.Jeffrey Hanson - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (3):514-527.
    ABSTRACT This article engages Frater Taciturnus’s ‘Letter to the Reader’ to argue for a religious aesthetics in Kierkegaard. This religious aesthetics is designed to purify the passions and help the believer ‘see’ the religious ideal, but also to confront the aesthetic spectator with the religious reality of her own situation. My claim for this revised reading of religious poetics in Kierkegaard derives from Taciturnus’s view of a superior form of religious ideality that comes ‘after actuality’. This ideality is not an (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  52.  3
    Hope and the Chaos of Imagination in Kant and Kierkegaard.Eleanor Helms - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (3):456-469.
    ABSTRACT Faith for Kierkegaard is ‘beyond’ reason in some senses but not others. Faith is more specific and more subjective than concepts. On the other hand, Kant claims it is the faculty of reason that motivates us to make sense of anything and enables us to take something teleologically as a task, including faith. I begin from Kant’s account of the artistic genius to show how the faculties of imagination and understanding are related for Kant and how Kierkegaard’s description of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  53.  3
    Introduction: Imagination in Kierkegaard and Beyond.Wojciech T. Kaftanski - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (3):405-413.
  54.  5
    Kissing the Image: An Allegory of Imagination in ‘The Seducer’s Diary’.Frances Maughan-Brown - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (3):528-542.
    ABSTRACT ‘The Seducer’s Diary’ is not a nostalgic account of a Romantic seducer-figure, and it does not represent the ‘ethical’ rejection of such Romanticism. Instead, it portrays the violence involved just as much in conventional bourgeois marriage as in works of erotic fantasy, and it reveals the necessary failure of both these projects. Although the suffering they may cause is real enough, they never manage to achieve the mastery they seek to impose. At the same time, this radical cultural critique (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  55.  3
    Promulgation, Condescension, Porosity and Defence: The Relationship Between Saint-Simonianism and Owenism.Michel Bellet - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (2):315-344.
    ABSTRACT This article aims to add an important new dimension to the historical scholarship on early socialism by analysing the Saint-Simonian encounter with Owenism during the first decades of the nineteenth century. The article shows how the Saint-Simonian interpretation of Owenism was shaped by the manner by which the Saint-Simonians disseminated their doctrine. It draws on a number of neglected texts to show what the Saint-Simonians drew from Owen’s work and how they set out to distinguish themselves from Owen and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  56.  2
    Continental Exiles, Chartists and Socialists in London.Fabrice Bensimon - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (2):271-284.
    ABSTRACT This article focuses on the interactions between British Owenites and continental refugees and groups of democrats in London. The article argues that despite serious disagreements between Owenites and Chartists, their interactions were important. The article focuses on refugee groups London, in the 1830s and 1840s, and examines their links with both the democrats’ and Owenites’ networks. The article focuses first on Etienne Cabet and the French republican exiles in 1830s London, before moving on to two democratic societies of exiles (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  57.  2
    A Transient Allergy: Owen and the Owenites According to Charles Fourier and the Fourierists, From the 1820s to 1837.Thomas Bouchet - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (2):345-358.
    ABSTRACT This article examines the Fourierist reception of Owenism. In challenging the established historiography on Owen’s reception in France, the article draws on a wide range of Fourierist material – letters, unpublished draft manuscripts, and neglected articles in Fourierist and non-Fourierist periodicals – that previously not accessible to twentieth-century historians in order to reassess the Fourierist response to Owen and Owenism. The article pays special attention to the work of Fourier’s leading disciple, Victor Considerant. It contrasts Fourier’s highly critical evaluation (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  58.  1
    Owen as read by Marc-Auguste Pictet (1752–1825) and J.C.L. Simonde de Sismondi.Nicolas Eyguesier - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (2):192-201.
    ABSTRACT This article examines how Owen’s ideas and their application in his factory in New-Lanark were understood and judged by the two leading members of Geneva’s liberal élite, J.C.L. Simonde de Sismondi and Marc-Auguste Pictet, who wrote extensively on questions pertaining to the development of industry. While Pictet and Sismondi shared Owen’s concerns over the deleterious consequences of industrialisation, and examined with interest his proposals to resolve these problems, they were quick to distance themselves from his solutions, and rejected his (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  59.  2
    Acknowledgements.Ludovic Frobert & Michael Drolet - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (2):191-191.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  60.  1
    Robert Owen and Continental Europe.Ludovic Frobert & Michael Drolet - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (2):175-190.
    ABSTRACT This introduction examines the intellectual, political, economic, and social context to the reception of Robert Owen’s ideas, and Owenism more generally, in Continental Europe. The introduction describes how Owen’s ideas attracted significant interest in the years following the Napoleonic Wars, particularly in France, and discusses how the French reception of his ideas served as a filter and medium through which his ideas were disseminated throughout Continental Europe. The article describes the individual contributions to this special issue and traces the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  61.  1
    The ‘Science of Education’ and Owenism: The Case of Joseph Rey.Ludovic Frobert & Michael Drolet - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (2):216-230.
    ABSTRACT This article examines the impact of Robert Owen’s educational ideas in France. It traces how his ideas attracted the attention of French liberals, particularly Charles de Lasteyrie, Alexandre de Laborde and Joseph-Marie de Gérando, and republicans associated with Marc-Antoine Jullien’s Revue Encyclopédique. The article focuses in particular on the work of one of Owen’s early French followers, the leading radical egalitarian political and social theorist Joseph Rey. The article examines how Owen’s reflections on education served as the foundation for (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  62.  1
    Liberal Economists and Owenism: Blanqui and Reybaud.Thomas Hopkins - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (2):231-251.
    ABSTRACT This article examines the reaction to Owen’s work in the circle associated with the liberal Journal des Économistes. It attempts to reconstruct the liberal argument against utopian socialist schemes of ‘regeneration’ and ‘redistribution’, and against those associated with Robert Owen in particular. It focuses on the works of Louis Reybaud and Adolphe Blanqui and their critical engagement with the writings of Saint-Simon, Fourier and Owen. It offers a detailed analysis of Reybaud’s Études sur les réformateurs, ou socialistes modernes, which (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  63.  3
    From Rejection to Historicisation: The Reception of Robert Owen’s Ideas in the Nineteenth-Century Polish Context.Piotr Kuligowski - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (2):202-215.
    ABSTRACT The main aim of this article is to investigate the reception of Owen’s ideas in the nineteenth-century Polish context. I argue that Owen’s ideas did not attract as much attention as those of, amongst others, Charles Fourier, Félicité de Lamennais, or – in the second half of the century – Karl Marx. Despite being overshadowed by other Romantic socialists, Owen’s reception in Poland can be described as having been marked by three phases. Though we can determine the general direction (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  64.  4
    Robert Owen’s Quest for the ‘New Moral World’ in a Non-Industrialized Country.José Manuel Menudo Pachón & Fernando López Castellano - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (2):359-373.
    ABSTRACT This article examines how Robert Owen’s ideas, and the example of his New Lanark Mill, were understood and received in Spain in the nineteenth century. It follows recent historiographic trends in the history of early Spanish socialism to show that although Owen’s ideas could not have a decisive impact in a largely agricultural economy and society, his ideas did draw more significant attention that has been thought. The article examines how Owen’s ideas, like those of Fourier and Saint-Simon, were (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  65.  2
    Robert Owen’s Influence on French Republicanism in the First Half of the Nineteenth Century: The Role of Former Saint-Simonians and Their Networks.Quentin Schwanck - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (2):299-314.
    ABSTRACT Robert Owen’s ideas and achievements largely shaped French republicanism in the 1830s and 1840s, particularly through the action of former Saint-Simonian socialists. This article explores this process, focusing on two of its major actors: the philosophers Pierre Leroux and Jean Reynaud, who joined the Republican Party in 1833. The two friends formulated an ambitious and influential republican doctrine in their Encyclopédie Nouvelle, in which Owen’s philosophy was largely mobilised, most particularly when Leroux theorised his religion de la fraternité on (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  66.  4
    ‘Goddess of Reason’: Anna Doyle Wheeler, Owenism and the Rights of Women.Ophélie Siméon - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (2):285-298.
    ABSTRACT This article examines the resonance of Robert Owen’s ideas in the field of women’s rights with the view to determining the extent of their dissemination in transnational networks. The article focuses on the life and work of Anna Doyle Wheeler, which offers an important, though understudied, case for exploring early feminist circles, and, as she was a friend of Owen’s and one of his earliest supporters from the 1820s onwards, the impact of Owen’s ideas within these circles. The article (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  67.  4
    The Reception of Robert Owen's Thought in Ninteenth- and Twentieth-Century Italy.Riccardo Soliani & Vitantonio Gioia - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (2):374-403.
    ABSTRACT This article examines the reception of Owen's thought in nineteenth- and twentieth-century Italy. The articles shows that while Owen attracted the attentionof Piedmontese liberals in the early 1820s, such as Giovanni Arrivabene, and were integrated into the wider Risorgimento, they were, as the Guiseppe Manzzini's work demonstrated, eclipsed by what were considered more the immediate political objectives of the Risorgimento. Where Owen's ideas did attract widespread interest was on the question of educational reform. This was because education was very (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  68.  1
    Millennium and Enlightenment: Robert Owen and the Second Coming of the Truth.Gareth Stedman Jones - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (2):252-270.
    ABSTRACT This article aims to explain the family resemblance between the early socialism that emerged in France from the aftermath of the Revolution and Owenite socialism, which emerged out of the very different political and religious circumstances of late Georgian Britain. While the ‘sciences’ of Henri Saint-Simon and Charles Fourier were conceived to end the crisis produced by the French Revolution, Owen’s newfound principle, what he called the ‘science of the influence of circumstance’, emerged from his A New View of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  69.  6
    Berkeley’s Passive Obedience: The Logic of Loyalty.Timo Airaksinen - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (1):58-70.
    ABSTRACT Berkeley argues in Passive Obedience that what he calls morality is based on the divine laws of nature, which God gave us and whose validity is like that of the principles of geometry. One of these laws is the categorical demand for loyalty to the supreme political power. This is to say, rebellious action is strictly impermissible and passive obedience is morally required: we may disobey but only in terms of action omission and then we must accept the penalty (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  70.  2
    Physiocracy in the Eighteenth-Century America. Economic Theory and Political Weapons.Manuela Albertone - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (1):97-118.
    ABSTRACT This essay aims at reconsidering the impact of Physiocratic ideas on the United States context during and after the American Revolution, which represented the first turning point concerning the democratic implications of political economy. In the confrontation in the 1790s between Jefferson’s Republicans and Hamilton’s Federalists the early scientific analysis of economics, grounded in the central role of agriculture formulated by Physiocracy, gave strong theoretical validation of the agrarian democracy ideology as an alternative to the British model and contributed (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  71.  1
    The Intellectual Origins of Mirabeau.Auguste Bertholet - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (1):91-96.
    ABSTRACT The recent discovery of the marquis de Mirabeau’s lifelong correspondence with his Swiss friend Frédéric de Sacconay has shed new light on the development of his economic thought. Not only is it the only precise entry in his daily life leading to his fame, but it also clarifies the context in which important eighteenth-century texts have been produced and read. Amongst this collection of letters, one of them, written by Mirabeau on October 12, 1740, establishes that he possessed a (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  72.  7
    A Novel (Coronavirus) Reading of Hobbes's Leviathan.Eileen Hunt Botting - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (1):33-37.
    ABSTRACT In the style of Swift and Wollstonecraft, I contribute to the growing pandemic literature on Hobbes by writing a feminist satire of the Leviathan for the age of the novel coronavirus. Hobbes's conceptions of the state of nature and the body politic are eerily relevant to the present political crises, especially in the United States. In a personal narrative that is both arch and absolutely serious, I reveal how a woman-empowering vision of a healthy global body politic can be (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  73.  2
    John Dunn and the History of Political Theory.Davide Cadeddu - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (1):158-167.
    ABSTRACT In 1992, John Dunn published an essay in Italian in which he summarized and clarified certain aspects of his historiographical vision concerning the history of political theory. A careful analysis of the text – corroborated by a consideration of later comments as well as general historical-theoretical references – gives us an insight into the lights and shadows of his thought. This reinterpretation reveals the originality of a perspective that examined the meaning of ‘canon’ within the history of political theory, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  74.  3
    Roman Dictatorship in the French Revolution.Marc de Wilde - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (1):140-157.
    ABSTRACT This article seeks to explain why the Roman dictatorship, which had served as a positive model of constitutional emergency government until the French Revolution, acquired a negative meaning during the Revolution itself. Both Montesquieu and Rousseau regarded the dictatorship as a legitimate institution, necessary to protect the republic in times of crisis. For the French revolutionaries, the word ‘dictatorship’ acquired negative connotations: it became a rhetorical tool for accusing their political opponents of authoritarian rule. This article argues that Carl (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  75.  2
    Catholic ‘Conscience’, Duty and Disputes Over English Liberties in Jacobean Ireland.Mark A. Hutchinson - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (1):38-57.
    ABSTRACT The article examines Old English claims to catholic ‘liberty of conscience’ and the way in which this engendered a discussion of English liberties in Ireland. Old English representatives sought to ground their claims to ‘liberty of conscience’ in established practice, custom and law. Their claims to ‘liberty of conscience’ also brought into play the vocabulary of corporate and parliamentary liberty. In response, New English protestants turned to ideas of duty and citizenship, which were equally embedded in conceptions of English (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  76.  1
    Egyptomania and Religion in James Burnett, Lord Monboddo’s ‘History of Man’.R. J. W. Mills - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (1):119-139.
    ABSTRACT The Scottish judge and ‘eccentric’ philosopher James Burnett, Lord Monboddo’s significance within Enlightenment thought is usually seen as stemming from his Origin and Progress of Language. The OPL was a major contribution to the Enlightenment’s debate over the philosophy of language, and established Monboddo’s reputation as an innovative and influential, yet controversial and credulous proto-anthropologist. In the following I explore Monboddo’s Egyptomania and the role it plays in his account of the origins and development of religion within his larger (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  77.  7
    Leviathan Inc.: Hobbes on the Nature and Person of the State.Johan Olsthoorn - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (1):17-32.
    ABSTRACT This article aspires to make two original contributions to the vast literature on Hobbes’s account of the nature and person of the commonwealth: I provide the first systematic analysis of his changing conception of ‘person’; and use it to show that those who claim that the Hobbesian commonwealth is created by personation by fiction misconstrue his theory of the state. Whereas Elements/de Cive advance a metaphysics-based distinction between individuals and corporations, from Leviathan onwards Hobbes contrasts individuals acting in their (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  78.  3
    Homo Duplex: The Two Origins of Man in Rousseau’s Second Discourse.Emma Planinc - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (1):71-90.
    ABSTRACT A division in scholarship on Rousseau’s Second Discourse turns on the issue of division itself. Some see Rousseau’s natural man collapsing the division between man and beast through suggesting that our origins might be in orangutans, while others see Rousseau depicting a rupture of the human being from the rest of the animal kingdom through the separation of the physical and the metaphysical. I argue that in looking to the natural scientific culture of Rousseau’s own time, one can see (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  79.  5
    Hobbes on Rebellious Groups.Jerónimo Rilla - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (1):1-16.
    ABSTRACT In this paper we deal with Hobbes’s elucidation of the political conflict caused by rebellious groups. First of all, we attempt to prove that groups are important characters in Hobbesian antagonisms. Secondly, it will be argued that the isomorphic structure that underlies all associations is vital to account for these disputes. To wit, the fact that minor corporate bodies are ‘similar’ vis à vis the State leaves a lengthy flank open to rebellion, since this homology may encourage their leaders (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  80.  4
    From Cicero to the Science of Man: From Moral Theology to Moral Philosophy: Cicero and Visions of Humanity From Locke to Hume, by Tim Stuart-Buttle, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2019, 288 Pp., £55 (Hardcover), ISBN-13: 9780198835585. [REVIEW]Paul Sagar - 2021 - History of European Ideas 47 (1):168-174.
 Previous issues
  
Next issues