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  1.  12
    Adam Smith, Anti-Stoic.Michele Bee & Maria Pia Paganelli - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (4):572-584.
    ABSTRACTCommerce changes the production of wealth in a society as well as its ethics. What is appropriate in a non-commercial society is not necessarily appropriate in a commercial one. Adam Smith criticizes Stoic self-command in commercial societies, rather than embracing it, as is often suggested. He argues that Stoicism, with its promotion of indifference to passions, is an ethic appropriate for savages. Savages live in hard conditions where expressing emotions is detrimental and reprehensible. In contrast, the ease of life brought (...)
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  2.  4
    A Portrait of Machiavelli and the Origins of Iconographic Anti-Machiavellism: Genesis, Fortunes, and Propagation of ‘La Testina’.Alessandro Campi - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (4):509-535.
    ABSTRACTThe centuries-long evolution of the iconography of Niccolò Machiavelli is itself a chapter in the history of Machiavelli’s reputation. As intuited by one of his foremost biographers, Oreste Tommasini, portraits of the Florentine are probably best considered as visual expressions of philosophical and literary anti-Machiavellism, which exercised, in their own way, a negative influence on the reception and interpretations of his writings. The Machiavelli who we have seen represented over the course of history in paintings, prints, and engravings may be (...)
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  3.  8
    Aquinas and Józef Tischner on Hope: As Part of the Intellectual Legacy of the Polish Solidarity Movement.Elżbieta Ciżewska-Martyńska - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (4):585-602.
    ABSTRACTThe aim of this article is to give an account of hope as it was understood by Józef Tischner a public intellectual and a prominent chaplain of the Polish Solidarity movement, which led to the fall of communism in Eastern Europe in 1989. The idea of hope was one of the basic ideas of the Solidarity movement, around which the daily experiences of its members were organized. The author thus offers insight into the intellectual history of the Eastern European dissidence (...)
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  4.  1
    Rousseau’s Reception as an Epicurean: From Atheism to Aesthetics.Jared Holley - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (4):553-571.
    ABSTRACTWhat did Rousseau's readers mean when they called him an ‘Epicurean’? A seemingly simple question with complex implications. This article attempts to answer it by reconstructing Rousseau's contemporary reception as an Epicurean thinker. First, it surveys the earliest and most widely read critics of the second Discourse: Prussian Astronomer Royal Jean de Castillon, Jesuit priest Louis Bertrand Castel, and Hanoverian biblical scholar Hermann Samuel Reimarus. These readers branded Rousseau an Epicurean primarily to highlight his atheism, his anti-providential and materialist natural (...)
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  5.  1
    Can States Trust Each Other?: Trust in Early Modern International Political Thought, 1598–1713, by Peter Schröder, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2017, X + 269 Pp., £75.00/$99.99 , ISBN: 9781316798515Trust and Hedging in International Relations, by Kendall W. Stiles, Ann Arbor, The University of Michigan Press, 2018, Viii + 318 Pp., £63.50/$80.00 , ISBN: 9780472130702. [REVIEW]Minchul Kim & Chaeyoung Yong - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (4):603-612.
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  6.  4
    Time, Right and the Justice of War and Peace in Hugo Grotius’s Political Thought.Hansong Li - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (4):536-552.
    ABSTRACTThe juridical force of time forms a critical, but hitherto unexplored part of Hugo Grotius’s discourse on the justice of war and peace. Grotius defines war as a span of time in which disputed rights and armed conflicts between states are examined in reference to temporal coordinates. This method allows him to adjust otherwise static laws to meet the demands of times and spaces in an increasingly expanded world. In doing so, Grotius is also able to reconcile multiple layers of (...)
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  7.  14
    Two Essays: I. The Desert and the City: Reading the History of Civilisation in Ibn Khaldun After Edward Gibbon. II. Rational Enthusiasm and Angelicality: The Concept of Prophecy in Ibn Khaldun and Edward Gibbon. [REVIEW]J. G. A. Pocock - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (4):469-508.
    ABSTRACTThe Desert and the City and Rational Enthusiasm are experiments in comparative historiography, based on no more evidence than is necessary in order to carry out the comparison, since to pursue either text into its historical context would be to pursue its intended meaning and no longer to compare it with the other. The essays aim to imagine an eighteenth-century judgement on a fourteenth-century text, intended not to support such a judgement, but to imagine what Gibbon would have said of (...)
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  8.  4
    Why Liberalism’s Roots Don’T Sprout Equally: Why Liberalism Failed, by Patrick J. Deneen, New Haven, CT, Yale University Press, 2018, 248 Pp., $24.09 , ISBN: 978-0-300-22344-6. [REVIEW]Nayeli L. Riano - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (4):613-623.
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  9.  1
    What’s Wrong with Subjective Rights?Nigel Biggar - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (3):399-409.
    ABSTRACTIn the last twenty years a critique of the idea of a right as the property of an individual subject has been articulated by some influential Anglican theologians – Joan Lockwood O’Donovan, Oliver O’Donovan and John Milbank. Their objections are considerably based on an argument about intellectual history. Broadly pursuing an intellectual trajectory first set by Leo Strauss and C. B. Macpherson, these theologians think that the very concept of a ‘subjective right’ is tied, certainly historically but perhaps also logically, (...)
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  10.  3
    How Contempt Became a Passion.Ross Carroll - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (3):346-362.
    ABSTRACTPhilosophers and psychologists have come to recognize contempt as a crucial concept for understanding moral and social life. Yet its conceptual history remains understudied. I argue that contempt underwent an important conceptual shift at the end of the 1640s with the publication of René Descartes’ Passions de l’âme. Prior to Descartes, early modern philosophers excluded contempt from their taxonomies of the passions, treating it instead as a form of indifference. To have contempt for something was to be free of passion (...)
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  11.  19
    Conscience: What is its History and Does It Have a Future?John Cottingham - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (3):338-345.
    ABSTRACTThis chapter looks briefly at the religious roots of the notion of ‘conscience’ in the Judaeo-Christian tradition, before examining the rise in the early-modern period of a ‘naturalizing’ approach that tries to explain our moral capacities in purely empirical terms, by reference to our natural inclinations and drives. The problem with this approach, highlighted by Joseph Butler, is that it fails to account for the authority or ‘normativity’ of the deliverances of conscience. An examination of the naturalistic approaches of J.S. (...)
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  12.  15
    Shame in Early Modern Thought: From Sin to Sociability.Hannah Dawson - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (3):377-398.
    ABSTRACTThis article challenges the historiographical narrative that modernity saw a transition from shame to guilt. I argue not only that these two concepts overlapped, but that, if anything, a shift occurred in the opposite direction: from guilt to shame. I identify two concepts of shame: guilt-shame, focused on sinfulness and caused by mere introspection, and reputation-shame, focused on social norms and caused by the gaze of others. Looking primarily at English texts, straying often into the European republic of letters, I (...)
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  13.  1
    Hans in Luck or the Moral Economy of Happiness in the Modern Age.Ute Frevert - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (3):363-376.
    ABSTRACTGenerations of men and women since antiquity have been preoccupied with the difficult quest for happiness. Up until modernity, people relied on the gods or God to grant them happiness. In the course of the eighteenth century, happiness became both a secular promise and a moral-political claim relevant to all people. The fairy tale Hans im Glück, published by the Grimm brothers in the early nineteenth century, and discussed in this article, provides a telling example of a quest for happiness (...)
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  14.  1
    Robert Persons’s Conference and the Salic Law Debate in France, 1584–1594.M. J. M. Innes - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (3):421-435.
    ABSTRACTThis article discusses the French debate of the 1580s over the status of the Salic Law and its influence upon an important text in English political thought, Robert Persons’s Conference about the next Succession to the Crowne of Ingland. Polemicists on both sides of the conflict between Henri of Navarre and the Catholic League, from Pierre de Belloy to the pseudonymous ‘Rossaeus’, sought to explain the French royal succession using a concept of custom drawn from Roman law. Custom offered these (...)
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  15.  1
    A Rejoinder to J.G.A. Pocock.Samuel James - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (3):465-467.
    ABSTRACTI am grateful for J. G. A. Pocock's generous response to my article on his early work and the development of the ‘Cambridge School'. In this brief rejoinder, I try to make clear that I meant in no way to diminish the importance of Pocock's achievement, or its centrality to the ‘Cambridge School’ story, while defending my view of the distinctive character and intellectual genealogy of his work.
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  16. The Natural Kingdom of God in Hobbes’s Political Thought.Ben Jones - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (3):436-453.
    ABSTRACTIn Leviathan, Hobbes outlines the concept of the ‘Kingdome of God by Nature’ or ‘Naturall Kingdome of God’, terms rarely found in English texts at the time. This article traces the concept back to the Catechism of the Council of Trent, which sets forth a threefold understanding of God’s kingdom – the kingdoms of nature, grace, and glory – none of which refer to civil commonwealths on earth. Hobbes abandons this Catholic typology and transforms the concept of the natural kingdom (...)
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  17.  18
    ‘You’Re a Brick’: Colloquialism and the History of Moral Concepts.Nakul Krishna - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (3):410-420.
    ABSTRACTThe Victorian period in Britain saw the curious emergence of the word ‘brick’ as a term of high praise, picking out for commendation certain qualities of character: reliability and a lack of whimsy. The novels and everyday conversation of the period were full of such phrases as ‘you’re a brick’ or ‘he’s a regular brick’. In this paper, I trace the history of this phrase in the respectable as well as popular literature of the period, including some ironic attempts to (...)
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  18.  2
    ‘Next to Godliness?’ Exploring Cleanliness in Peace and War.Lynda Mugglestone - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (3):322-337.
    ABSTRACTIn the history of English, the early moral centring of cleanliness is conventionally depicted as having been eroded. This paper aims instead to explore its continued moral dynamism, using language as prime resource. Examining the complex semantic trajectories of cleanliness from Middle English onwards, it documents its shifting status in a number of disparate registers, including chastity, domestic virtue, and health, alongside the forms of moral expression these reveal. The conventionalised alliance of cleanliness with godliness forms part of this process (...)
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  19.  1
    What Moral Philosophers Can Learn From the History of Moral Concepts.Edward Skidelsky - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (3):311-321.
    ABSTRACTIt is often claimed that the core moral concepts are universal, though the words used to articulate them have changed significantly. I reject this claim. Concepts cannot be disentangled from words; as these latter change, they change too. Thus the philosophical analysis of moral concepts cannot overlook the history of the words by which these concepts have been expressed. In the second part of the essay, I illustrate this claim with the example of happiness, showing how its original ‘verdictive’ meaning (...)
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  20.  5
    The Radicalism of Modesty: Democracy and Art in Camusian Thought.Tommaso Visone - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (3):454-464.
    ABSTRACTAlbert Camus has rarely been considered as a theoretician of democracy. Nonetheless, from the end of the Thirties it is possible to find in his different writings several observations relating to politics and the life of democracy and democracies. The second half of the Forties saw this interest, intertwined with the new post-WWII context, being explicitly dedicated to such subjects in the form of several articles and observations. Through the latter, Camus developed a radical – literally ‘that goes to roots’ (...)
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  21.  3
    John Millar’s Theses for Admission as an Advocate.John W. Cairns - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (2):304-305.
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  22.  1
    The Letters.John W. Cairns - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (2):237-303.
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  23.  2
    John Millar’s Theses for Admission as an Advocate.John W. Cairns - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (2):306-309.
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  24.  1
    The Letters of John Millar.John W. Cairns - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (2):232-236.
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  25.  1
    Millar and His Circle. A Preface.Knud Haakonssen - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (2):125-127.
    ABSTRACTThis special issue of History of European Ideas publishes several little known sources for the life and work of John Millar. This material supplements modern editions of his works and the records of his professional formation, his teaching, his life as a professor, his political engagement. The Preface suggests that Millar’s form of Whiggism was an exception to the general despair over the relevance of Enlightenment political ideas that has been persuasively diagnosed in other theorists of British politics towards the (...)
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  26.  2
    Letters.Anna Plassart - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (2):191-231.
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  27.  3
    Letters.Anna Plassart - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (2):148-190.
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  28.  3
    Introduction: Millar and His Circle.Anna Plassart - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (2):128-147.
    ABSTRACTThis essay examines two anonymous pamphlets that have sometimes been attributed to John Millar: the ‘Letters of Sidney’, and the ‘Letters of Crito’, both published in 1796 by the Scots Chronicle. It outlines the political context for the pamphlets’ publication and the evidence for and against Millar's authorship, and reassesses their contents' significance for our interpretation of Millar's other writings. While the ‘Letters of Crito’ present a classically Foxite critique of Pitt's ministry and Britain's war against revolutionary France, the ‘Letters (...)
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  29.  5
    Toward a Comparatist Horizon in Conceptual History.Iulian Cananau - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (1):117-120.
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  30.  6
    J.G.A. Pocock and the Idea of the ‘Cambridge School’ in the History of Political Thought.Samuel James - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (1):83-98.
    ABSTRACTThis article offers a reinterpretation of the origins and character of the so-called ‘Cambridge School’ in the history of political thought by reconstructing the intellectual background to J.G.A. Pocock's 1962 essay ‘The History of Political Thought: A Methodological Enquiry’, typically regarded as the first statement of a ‘Cambridge’ approach. I argue that neither linguistic philosophy nor the celebrated work of Peter Laslett exerted a major influence on Pocock's work between 1948 and 1962. Instead, I emphasise the importance of Pocock's interest (...)
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  31.  3
    A. V. Dicey and English Constitutionalism.James Kirby - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (1):33-46.
    ABSTRACTThe jurist A. V. Dicey’s study of the Law of the Constitution has been since its publication the dominant analysis of the British constitution and the source of orthodoxy on such subjects as parliamentary sovereignty and the rule of law. This canonical status has obscured the originality of Dicey’s ideas in the history of legal and political thought. Dicey reworked the traditional idea of sovereignty into two separate concepts – legal and political sovereignty – in order to square the common (...)
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  32.  4
    Bentham on Asceticism and Tyranny.Tsin Yen Koh - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (1):1-14.
    ABSTRACTIn the late 1810s, Jeremy Bentham wrote a set of texts entitled Not Paul, But Jesus, arguing against the religious authority of St. Paul, and the principle of asceticism he propagated. This paper argues that Bentham’s critique of the principle of asceticism was not only or primarily a religious one, but a political one. Bentham objected to the principle of asceticism because it could be used to provide practical and ideological support for tyranny. The principle of asceticism, as a principle (...)
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  33.  4
    Thomas Carlyle's Calvinist Dialogue with the Nineteenth-Century Periodical Press.Joanna Malecka - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (1):15-32.
    ABSTRACTThis article signals at a dearth of critical engagement with Thomas Carlyle's Presbyterian heritage resulting from the received whiggish narrative of his Calvinism as unenlightened, anachronistic, and backward-looking. It proceeds to challenge this view by examining closely Carlyle's creative use of key Calvinist concepts in his cosmopolitan and enlightened dialogue with the contemporary periodical press over British and European cultures. Carlyle is shown to be an adept purveyor both of the Edinburgh Magazine's enlightened idiom and of Blackwood's morally conservative and (...)
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  34.  11
    Cul de Sac: Patrimony, Capitalism, and Slavery in French Saint-Domingue. [REVIEW]Jungki Min - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (1):121-123.
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  35.  4
    Mill’s Closet: J.S. Mill on Solitude and the Imperfect Democracy.Guy Paltieli - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (1):47-63.
    ABSTRACTThis paper focuses on the role solitude played in John Stuart Mill’s political thought. By doing so, it challenges contemporary appropriations of Mill’s thought by participatory, deliberative and epistemic theories of democracy. Mill considered solitude to be contrary to political participation and public debate, but nonetheless regarded it as essential for democracy and for intellectual progress. Since the early 1830s Mill began developing an idea of solitude while simultaneously forming a particular kind of a democratic model which I refer to (...)
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  36.  7
    A Response to Samuel James’s ‘J. G. A. Pocock and the Idea of the “Cambridge School” in the History of Political Thought’. [REVIEW]J. G. A. Pocock - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (1):99-103.
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  37.  12
    Joseph Priestley on Metaphysics and Politics: Jonathan Israel's ‘Radical Enlightenment’ Reconsidered.Evangelos Sakkas - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (1):104-116.
    ABSTRACTThis article probes Jonathan Israel’s theory about ‘Radical Enlightenment’ inaugurating political modernity by way of explicating the thought of Joseph Priestley. In Israel’s view, despite the inconsistencies plaguing Socinian thought, Priestley, a monist, emerged as an ardent supporter of religious toleration and democratic republicanism. This article seeks to restore the fundamental coherence of Priestley’s theological and metaphysical views, arguing that they were produced as parts of a system founded on the simultaneous adherence to providentialism and necessitarianism. Prized as a prerequisite (...)
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  38.  4
    Edward Abramowski's Concept of Stateless Socialism and its Impact on Progressive Social Movements in Poland in the Twentieth Century.Piotr Żuk - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (1):64-82.
    ABSTRACTThe author traces the impact of Abramowski's ideas on the recent history of Poland. His concepts were not only popular in the Polish Socialist Party and the syndicalist movement in the interwar period, but they also exerted a profound influence on the cooperative movement and democratic left-wing opposition in the 1970s and 1980s. The leaders of the Workers’ Defence Committee were much influenced by Abramowski's ideas and, according to some researchers, the Solidarity movement from 1980 to 1981 in Poland was (...)
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