Year:

  1.  10
    Christoph Luetge, Hannes Rusch, & Matthias Uhl , Experimental Ethics: Toward an Empirical Moral Philosophy.Mark Alfano - 2017 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 20 (1):185-188.
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  2.  4
    Pabst Battin, Margaret . ‘The Ethics of Suicide’. Historical Sources. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015. 716 Pp. ISBN 978–0–19-513,599-2. Paperback £ 32.99. [REVIEW]Joanne Beswick - 2017 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 20 (1):213-214.
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  3.  1
    Comparing and Integrating Biological and Cultural Moral Progress.Markus Christen, Darcia Narvaez & Eveline Gutzwiller-Helfenfinger - 2017 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 20 (1):55-73.
    Moral progress may be a matter of time scale. If intuitive measures of moral progress like the degree of physical violence within a society are taken as empirical markers, then most human societies have experienced moral progress in the last few centuries. However, if the development of the human species is taken as relevant time scale, there is evidence that humanity has experienced a global moral decline compared to a small-band hunter-gatherer baseline that represents a lifestyle presumed to largely account (...)
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  4.  5
    Weyma Lübbe: Nonaggregationismus. Grundlagen der Allokationsethik, Muenster: Mentis 2015. ISBN: 978-3-95743-015-1, € 42.Annette Dufner & Bettina Schoene-Seifert - 2017 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 20 (1):209-212.
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  5.  22
    Slavery, Carbon, and Moral Progress.Dale Jamieson - 2017 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 20 (1):169-183.
    My goal in this paper is to shed light on how moral progress actually occurs. I begin by restating a conception of moral progress that I set out in previous work, the “Naïve Conception,” and explain how it comports with various normative and metaethical views. I go on to develop an index of moral progress and show how judgments about moral progress can be made. I then discuss an example of moral progress from the past—the British abolition of the Atlantic (...)
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  6.  1
    Nancy Sherman, Afterwar. Oxford University Press, 2015 ISBN: 9780199325276. £16.99. [REVIEW]Jesse Kirkpatrick - 2017 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 20 (1):201-203.
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  7.  12
    Chrisman, Matthew. The Meaning of ‘Ought’. Beyond Descriptivism and Expressivism in Metaethics. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016. 260 Pp. ISBN 978-0-19-936300-1. £41.99. [REVIEW]Sebastian Köhler - 2017 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 20 (1):197-200.
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  8.  8
    Lippert-Rasmussen, Kasper. Luck Egalitarianism.Gerald Lang - 2017 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 20 (1):215-217.
  9.  1
    Editorial Note.A. W. Musschenga & F. R. Heeger - 2017 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 20 (1):1-1.
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  10.  1
    Moral Progress: An Introduction.Albert W. Musschenga & Gerben Meynen - 2017 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 20 (1):3-15.
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  11.  4
    Tatjana Visak & Robert Garner : The Ethics of Killing Animals. Oxford: Oxford University Press 2016. ISBN: 9780199396085; £19.99. [REVIEW]Christoph Schmidt-Petri - 2017 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 20 (1):193-195.
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  12. Rationalizing Our Way Into Moral Progress.Jesse S. Summers - 2017 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 20 (1):93-104.
    Research suggests that the explicit reasoning we offer to ourselves and to others is often rationalization, that we act instead on instincts, inclinations, stereotypes, emotions, neurobiology, habits, reactions, evolutionary pressures, unexamined principles, or justifications other than the ones we think we’re acting on, then we tell a post hoc story to justify our actions. This is troubling for views of moral progress according to which moral progress proceeds from our engagement with our own and others’ reasons. I consider an account (...)
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  13.  11
    Tim Lewens, The Biological Foundations of Bioethics.Karsten Witt - 2017 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 20 (1):205-207.
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  14.  3
    Axel Honneth , Die Idee des Sozialismus.Daniela Zumpf - 2017 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 20 (1):189-191.
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