88 found

Year:

  1.  11
    Ingrid Robeyns, Wellbeing, Freedom and Social Justice: The Capability Approach Re-Examined.Jessica Begon - 2018 - Ethics 129 (1):135-139.
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  2.  4
    Robeyns, Ingrid. Wellbeing, Freedom and Social Justice: The Capability Approach Re-Examined. Cambridge: Open Book, 2017. Pp. 268. $41.23 ; $22.87. [REVIEW]Jessica Begon - 2018 - Ethics 129 (1):135-139.
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  3.  11
    Sypnowich, Christine. Equality Renewed: Justice, Flourishing and the Egalitarian Ideal. New York: Routledge, 2017. Pp. 252. $155.00. [REVIEW]Paul Billingham - 2018 - Ethics 129 (1):144-149.
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  4.  6
    Jonathan White and Lea Ypi, The Meaning of Partisanship.Matteo Bonotti - 2018 - Ethics 129 (1):168-172.
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  5.  5
    White, Jonathan, and Ypi, Lea. The Meaning of Partisanship. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016. Pp. 288. $90.00.Matteo Bonotti - 2018 - Ethics 129 (1):168-172.
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  6.  6
    Christine Tappolet, Emotions, Values, and Agency.Michael S. Brady - 2018 - Ethics 129 (1):150-154.
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  7.  3
    Tappolet, Christine. Emotions, Values, and Agency. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016. Pp. 240. $70.00.Michael S. Brady - 2018 - Ethics 129 (1):150-154.
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  8.  9
    Christopher Heath Wellman, Rights Forfeiture and Punishment.Kimberley Brownlee - 2018 - Ethics 129 (1):158-164.
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  9.  5
    Wellman, Christopher Heath. Rights Forfeiture and Punishment.Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017. Pp. 240. $65.00.Kimberley Brownlee - 2018 - Ethics 129 (1):158-164.
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  10.  2
    Colleen Murphy, The Conceptual Foundations of Transitional Justice.Nir Eisikovits - 2018 - Ethics 129 (1):132-135.
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  11.  1
    Murphy, Colleen. The Conceptual Foundations of Transitional Justice. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2017. Pp. 231. $74.95 ; $29.99. [REVIEW]Nir Eisikovits - 2018 - Ethics 129 (1):132-135.
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  12.  16
    Moral Realism, Aesthetic Realism, and the Asymmetry Claim.Louise Hanson - 2018 - Ethics 129 (1):39-69.
    Many people accept, at least implicitly, what I call the asymmetry claim: the view that moral realism is more defensible than aesthetic realism. This article challenges the asymmetry claim. I argue that it is surprisingly hard to find points of contrast between the two domains that could justify their very different treatment with respect to realism. I consider five potentially promising ways to do this, and I argue that all of them fail. If I am right, those who accept the (...)
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  13. Contrary-to-Duty Scenarios, Deontic Dilemmas, and Transmission Principles.Benjamin Kiesewetter - 2018 - Ethics 129 (1):98-115.
    Actualists hold that contrary-to-duty scenarios give rise to deontic dilemmas and provide counterexamples to the transmission principle, according to which we ought to take the necessary means to actions we ought to perform. In an earlier article, I have argued, contrary to actualism, that the notion of ‘ought’ that figures in conclusions of practical deliberation does not allow for deontic dilemmas and validates the transmission principle. Here I defend these claims, together with my possibilist account of contrary-to-duty scenarios, against Stephen (...)
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  14.  20
    That’s What She Said: The Language of Sexual Negotiation.Rebecca Kukla - 2018 - Ethics 129 (1):70-97.
    I explore how we negotiate sexual encounters with one another in language and consider the pragmatic structure of such negotiations. I defend three theses: Discussions of consent have dominated the philosophical and legal discourse around sexual negotiation, and this has distorted our understanding of sexual agency and ethics. Of central importance to good-quality sexual negotiation are sexual invitations and gift offers, as well as speech designed to set up safe frameworks and exit conditions. Sexual communication that goes well does not (...)
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  15.  2
    Smuts, Aaron. Welfare, Meaning and Worth. New York: Routledge, 2018. Pp. 168. $140.00.Iddo Landau - 2018 - Ethics 129 (1):140-144.
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  16.  17
    Alexandrova, Anna. A Philosophy for the Science of Well-Being. New York: Oxford University Press, 2017. Pp. 248. $65.00. [REVIEW]Eden Lin - 2018 - Ethics 129 (1):116-122.
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  17.  21
    Kiesewetter, Benjamin. The Normativity of Rationality. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017. Pp. 344. $65.00.Clayton Littlejohn - 2018 - Ethics 129 (1):127-132.
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  18.  4
    Eklund, Matti. Choosing Normative Concepts. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017. Pp. 224. $55.00.Sarah Zoe Raskoff - 2018 - Ethics 129 (1):122-127.
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  19.  7
    Editorial: The Devotion and Diversity of the Associate Editors.Henry S. Richardson - 2018 - Ethics 129 (1):1-7.
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  20.  6
    Wendt, Fabian. Compromise, Peace and Public Justification: Political Morality Beyond Justice. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016. Pp. 286. $109.99. [REVIEW]Steven Wall - 2018 - Ethics 129 (1):164-168.
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  21.  6
    Veltman, Andrea. Meaningful Work. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016. Pp. 248. $90.00.Adrian Walsh - 2018 - Ethics 129 (1):154-158.
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  22.  48
    Deliberation and Emancipation: Some Critical Remarks.Philip Yaure - 2018 - Ethics 129 (1):8-38.
    This article draws on the antebellum political thought of Black abolitionists Frederick Douglass and Martin Delany in critically assessing the efficacy of reasonableness in advancing the aims of emancipatory politics in political discourse. I argue, through a reading of Douglass and Delany, that comporting oneself reasonably in the face of oppressive ideology can be counterproductive, if one’s aim is to undermine such ideology and the institutions it supports. Douglass and Delany, I argue, also provide us with a framework for evaluating (...)
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  23.  13
    Kate Greasley, Arguments About Abortion: Personhood, Morality, and Law. [REVIEW]Amy Berg - 2018 - Ethics 128 (4):814-818.
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  24.  5
    Greasley, Kate. Arguments About Abortion: Personhood, Morality, and Law. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017. Pp. 250. $75.00 ; $29.95. [REVIEW]Amy Berg - 2018 - Ethics 128 (4):814-818.
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  25.  7
    Cécile Laborde, Liberalism’s Religion.Emanuela Ceva - 2018 - Ethics 128 (4):819-823.
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  26.  4
    Laborde, Cécile. Liberalism’s Religion. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2017. Pp. 344. $35.00.Emanuela Ceva - 2018 - Ethics 128 (4):819-823.
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  27.  27
    On Epistemic Appropriation.Emmalon Davis - 2018 - Ethics 128 (4):702-727.
    In this article, I offer an account of an unjust epistemic practice―namely, epistemic appropriation―that harms marginalized knowers through the course of conceptual dissemination and intercommunal uptake. The harm of epistemic appropriation is twofold. First, while epistemic resources developed within the margins gain uptake with dominant audiences, those resources are overtly detached from the marginalized knowers responsible for their production. Second, epistemic resources developed within, but detached from, the margins are utilized in dominant discourses in ways that disproportionately benefit the powerful.
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  28.  8
    Cristina Bicchieri, Norms in the Wild: How to Diagnose, Measure, and Change Social Norms.Lina Eriksson - 2018 - Ethics 128 (4):809-814.
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  29.  8
    Bicchieri, Cristina. Norms in the Wild: How to Diagnose, Measure, and Change Social Norms. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016. Pp. 264. $105.00 ; $29.95. [REVIEW]Lina Eriksson - 2018 - Ethics 128 (4):809-814.
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  30.  40
    The Ethics of Metaphor.Rachel Elizabeth Fraser - 2018 - Ethics 128 (4):728-755.
    Increasingly, metaphors are the target of political critique: Jewish groups condemn Holocaust imagery; mental health organizations, the metaphorical exploitation of psychosis; and feminists, “rape metaphors.” I develop a novel model for making sense of such critiques of metaphor.
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  31.  37
    Neil Sinhababu, Humean Nature: How Desire Explains Action, Thought, and Feeling.Zoë Annis Johnson King - 2018 - Ethics 128 (4):836-840.
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  32.  5
    Sinhababu, Neil. Humean Nature: How Desire Explains Action, Thought, and Feeling. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017. Pp. 224. $70.00. [REVIEW]Zoë Annis Johnson King - 2018 - Ethics 128 (4):836-840.
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  33.  1
    Christopher McMahon, Reasonableness and Fairness: A Historical Theory.Anthony Simon Laden - 2018 - Ethics 128 (4):823-827.
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  34.  3
    McMahon, Christopher. Reasonableness and Fairness: A Historical Theory. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2016. Pp. 264. $99.99. [REVIEW]Anthony Simon Laden - 2018 - Ethics 128 (4):823-827.
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  35.  6
    Susan P. Murphy, Responsibility in an Interconnected World: International Assistance, Duty, and Action.Sylvie Loriaux - 2018 - Ethics 128 (4):827-831.
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  36.  1
    Murphy, Susan P.. Responsibility in an Interconnected World: International Assistance, Duty, and Action. Basel, Switzerland: Springer, 2016. Pp. 173. $99.99 ; $29.99. [REVIEW]Sylvie Loriaux - 2018 - Ethics 128 (4):827-831.
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  37. Is There a Distinctively Political Normativity?Jonathan Leader Maynard & Alex Worsnip - 2018 - Ethics 128 (4):756-787.
    A slew of recent political theorists—many taking their cue from the political writings of Bernard Williams—have recently contended that political normativity is its own kind of normativity, distinct from moral normativity. In this article, we first attempt to clarify what this claim amounts to and then reconstruct and interrogate five major arguments for it. We contend that all these arguments are unconvincing and fail to establish a sense in which political normativity is genuinely separate from morality.
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  38.  7
    Jeremy Waldron, One Another’s Equals: The Basis of Human Equality.Rekha Nath - 2018 - Ethics 128 (4):840-845.
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  39.  6
    Waldron, Jeremy. One Another’s Equals: The Basis of Human Equality. Cambridge, MA: Belknap, 2017. Pp. 280. $29.95.Rekha Nath - 2018 - Ethics 128 (4):840-845.
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  40.  5
    Hanno Sauer, Moral Judgments as Educated Intuitions.Regina Rini - 2018 - Ethics 128 (4):831-835.
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  41.  4
    Sauer, Hanno. Moral Judgments as Educated Intuitions. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2017. Pp. 328. $50.00.Regina Rini - 2018 - Ethics 128 (4):831-835.
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  42.  28
    Is Agent-Regret Rational?David Sussman - 2018 - Ethics 128 (4):788-808.
    Bernard Williams claims that we should feel “agent-regret” for bad events we cause but for which we are not blameworthy. Such agent-regret involves no presupposition of fault, yet it also involves a need to personally make amends. This combination suggests that agent-regret, even if virtuous, is inherently irrational. In this paper, I defend agent-regret from attempts to explain it away as a confusion of other attitudes. I argue that the rationality of agent-regret is found in how it makes sense as (...)
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  43.  19
    Snedegar, Justin. Contrastive Reasons. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017. Pp. 160. $55.00.Chrisoula Andreou - 2018 - Ethics 128 (3):666-672.
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  44.  11
    Linda Trinkaus Zagzebski, Exemplarist Moral Theory. [REVIEW]Alfred Archer - 2018 - Ethics 128 (3):682-686.
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  45.  6
    Zagzebski, Linda Trinkaus. Exemplarist Moral Theory. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017. Pp. 288. $69.00. [REVIEW]Alfred Archer - 2018 - Ethics 128 (3):682-686.
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  46.  44
    Responsibility, Libertarians, and the “Facts as We Know Them”: A Concern-Based Construal of Strawson’s Reversal.David Beglin - 2018 - Ethics 128 (3):612-625.
    Here, I put forth a construal of P. F. Strawson’s so-called reversal, his view that what it means to be morally responsible is determined by our practices of holding responsible. The “concern-based” construal that I defend holds that what it means to be morally responsible is determined by the basic social concerns of which our practices are an expression. This construal, I argue, avoids a dilemma that Patrick Todd has recently raised for the reversal.
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  47. Black Lives Matter and the Call for Death Penalty Abolition.Michael Cholbi & Alex Madva - 2018 - Ethics 128 (3):517-544.
    The Black Lives Matter movement has called for the abolition of capital punishment in response to what it calls “the war against Black people” and “Black communities.” This article defends the two central contentions in the movement’s abolitionist stance: first, that US capital punishment practices represent a wrong to black communities rather than simply a wrong to particular black capital defendants or particular black victims of murder, and second, that the most defensible remedy for this wrong is the abolition of (...)
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  48.  27
    A Perfectionist Humean Constructivism.Dale Dorsey - 2018 - Ethics 128 (3):574-602.
    In this article, I articulate and explore a novel constructivist approach to metanormativity that is inspired by David Hume’s metaesthetics. This view, which I call perfectionist Humean constructivism, rejects the claim that practical reasons are constructed by each individual’s valuing attitudes, holding instead that they are constructed by humanity’s shared evaluative nature. I hold that this approach can plausibly respond to a persistent worry for extant versions of Humean constructivism without embracing the commitments of either a Kantian constructivism or a (...)
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  49.  12
    Iyiola Solanke, Discrimination as Stigma: A Theory of Anti-Discrimination Law.Benjamin Eidelson - 2018 - Ethics 128 (3):678-682.
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  50.  4
    Solanke, Iyiola. Discrimination as Stigma: A Theory of Anti-Discrimination Law. Oxford: Hart, 2017. Pp. 256. $94.00.Benjamin Eidelson - 2018 - Ethics 128 (3):678-682.
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  51.  35
    David Sobel, From Valuing to Value: A Defense of Subjectivism.David Enoch - 2018 - Ethics 128 (3):672-677.
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  52.  12
    Sobel, David. From Valuing to Value: A Defense of Subjectivism. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017. Pp. 352. $85.00. [REVIEW]David Enoch - 2018 - Ethics 128 (3):672-677.
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  53. Coercion: The Wrong and the Bad.Michael Garnett - 2018 - Ethics 128 (3):545-573.
    The idea of coercion is one that has played, and continues to play, at least two importantly distinct moral-theoretic roles in our thinking. One, which has been the focus of a number of recent influential treatments, is a primarily deontic role in which claims of coercion serve to indicate relatively weighty prima facie wrongs and excuses. The other, by contrast, is a primarily axiological or eudaimonic role in which claims of coercion serve to pick out instances of some distinctive kind (...)
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  54.  10
    Elizabeth Anderson, Private Government: How Employers Rule Our Lives.Iñigo González-Ricoy - 2018 - Ethics 128 (3):642-646.
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  55.  3
    Anderson, Elizabeth. Private Government: How Employers Rule Our Lives . Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2017. Pp. Xxiii+224. $27.95. [REVIEW]Iñigo González-Ricoy - 2018 - Ethics 128 (3):642-646.
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  56.  7
    Egalitarianism About Expected Utility.Toby Handfield - 2018 - Ethics 128 (3):603-611.
    Alex Voorhoeve and Marc Fleurbaey have developed a novel theory of distributive ethics, which incorporates a concern for inequality in both outcomes and life chances. This article demonstrates that their attempt to measure life chances is problematic for two reasons. First, it cannot be generalized to variable population cases without inheriting the problems of average utilitarianism. Second, it does not consistently respect the very ideas that were used to motivate the proposal.
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  57.  87
    Rik Peels, Responsible Belief: A Theory in Ethics and Epistemology. [REVIEW]Robert J. Hartman - 2018 - Ethics 128 (3):646-651.
  58.  10
    Liam Shields, Just Enough: Sufficiency as a Demand of Justice.Zi Lin - 2018 - Ethics 128 (3):662-666.
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  59.  1
    Shields, Liam. Just Enough: Sufficiency as a Demand of Justice. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2016. Pp. 224. $105.00 ; $29.95. [REVIEW]Zi Lin - 2018 - Ethics 128 (3):662-666.
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  60.  7
    Rose, Julie L. Free Time. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2016. Pp. 184. $35.00.Alex Sager - 2018 - Ethics 128 (3):657-662.
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  61. Two Problems for Accepting as Intending.Nathaniel Sharadin - 2018 - Ethics 128 (3):626-641.
    It’s possible to accept or to reject a promise. According to a new proposal by Abraham Roth, accepting a promise involves intending that the promisee perform the promised action. According to Roth, this view is supported by rational symmetries between promissory acceptance and intention. Here, I show how these symmetries actually generate two problems for the view.
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  62.  15
    Berislav Marušić, Evidence and Agency: Norms of Belief for Promising and Resolving.Katia Vavova - 2018 - Ethics 128 (3):687-695.
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  63.  8
    Marušić, Berislav. Evidence and Agency: Norms of Belief for Promising and Resolving. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015. Pp. 256. $65.00. [REVIEW]Katia Vavova - 2018 - Ethics 128 (3):687-695.
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  64.  15
    Ingmar Persson, Inclusive Ethics: Extending Beneficence and Egalitarian Justice.David Wasserman - 2018 - Ethics 128 (3):651-657.
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  65.  2
    Persson, Ingmar. Inclusive Ethics: Extending Beneficence and Egalitarian Justice. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017. Pp. 288. $70.00. [REVIEW]David Wasserman - 2018 - Ethics 128 (3):651-657.
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  66.  22
    Melissa Moschella, To Whom Do Children Belong? Parental Rights, Civic Education, and Children’s Autonomy.Samantha Brennan - 2018 - Ethics 128 (2):487-491.
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  67.  14
    Moschella, Melissa. To Whom Do Children Belong? Parental Rights, Civic Education, and Children’s Autonomy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2016. Pp. 212. $110.00 ; $32.99. [REVIEW]Samantha Brennan - 2018 - Ethics 128 (2):487-491.
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  68. Lies, Control, and Consent: A Response to Dougherty and Manson.Danielle Bromwich & Joseph Millum - 2018 - Ethics 128 (2):446-461.
    Tom Dougherty argues that culpably deceiving another person into sex is seriously wrong no matter what the content about which she is deceived. We argue that his explanation of why deception invalidates consent has extremely implausible implications. Though we reject Dougherty’s explanation, we defend his verdict about deception and consent to sex. We argue that he goes awry by conflating the disclosure requirement for consent and the understanding requirement. When these are distinguished, we can identify how deceptive disclosure invalidates consent. (...)
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  69.  18
    Prospective Duties and the Demands of Beneficence.Chiara Cordelli - 2018 - Ethics 128 (2):373-401.
    I argue that an agent can be appropriately blamed for failing to assist someone in need, even if her failure to assist is not wrong, and that an agent can be morally required to assist even if assisting is overly costly for her—more costly than what the relevant moral baseline is ordinarily taken to allow. Whether this is the case depends on whether the agent has previously failed to discharge her “prospective duties.” Once these duties are taken into consideration, even (...)
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  70.  3
    Cécile Fabre, Cosmopolitan Peace.Christopher J. Finlay - 2018 - Ethics 128 (2):467-473.
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  71.  5
    Fabre, Cécile. Cosmopolitan Peace. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016. Pp. 368. $70.00.Christopher J. Finlay - 2018 - Ethics 128 (2):467-473.
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  72.  21
    Elizabeth Barnes, The Minority Body: A Theory of Disability.Jennifer Hawkins - 2018 - Ethics 128 (2):462-467.
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  73.  8
    Barnes, Elizabeth. The Minority Body: A Theory of Disability. New York: Oxford University Press, 2016. Pp. 160. $45.00. [REVIEW]Jennifer Hawkins - 2018 - Ethics 128 (2):462-467.
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  74.  3
    Tarunabh Khaitan, A Theory of Discrimination Law.Deborah Hellman - 2018 - Ethics 128 (2):473-478.
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  75.  4
    Khaitan, Tarunabh. A Theory of Discrimination Law. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015. Pp. 288. $115.00 ; $42.50.Deborah Hellman - 2018 - Ethics 128 (2):473-478.
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  76.  24
    Parfit, Derek. On What Matters. Vol. 3. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017. Pp. 488. $45.00 .Singer, Peter, Ed. Does Anything Really Matter? Essays on Parfit on Objectivity. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017. Pp. 288. $45.00. [REVIEW]Nicholas Laskowski - 2018 - Ethics 128 (2):496-505.
    Over the course of summarizing Volume Three and Does Anything Really Matter?, I argue that Parfit does not give us strong reason to think that Naturalists, Expressivists, and Non-Realist Cognitivists agree.
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  77.  28
    Welfare Invariabilism.Eden Lin - 2018 - Ethics 128 (2):320-345.
    Invariabilism is the view that the same theory of welfare is true of every welfare subject. Variabilism is the view that invariabilism is false. In light of how many welfare subjects there are and how greatly they differ in their natures and capacities, it is natural to suppose that variabilism is true. I argue that these considerations do not support variabilism and, indeed, that we should accept invariabilism. This has important implications: it eliminates many of the going theories of welfare (...)
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  78.  10
    On Darwall’s Case Against the Normal Justification Thesis.Ezequiel Horacio Monti - 2018 - Ethics 128 (2):432-445.
    In a series of recent papers, Darwall has argued that Raz’s Normal Justification Thesis ought to be rejected. Here I shall argue that Darwall’s criticisms are unsuccessful. First, I argue that, contrary to what Darwall suggests, the NJT does not rely on an inference from the fact that B has a reason to treat A’s directives as protected reasons to the conclusion that A’s directives are protected reasons for B. Second, I argue that Darwall’s arguments to the effect that the (...)
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  79.  14
    Serena Parekh, Refugees and the Ethics of Forced Displacement. [REVIEW]Cara Nine - 2018 - Ethics 128 (2):491-495.
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  80.  7
    Ron Mallon, The Construction of Human Kinds.Katherine Ritchie - 2018 - Ethics 128 (2):478-482.
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  81.  17
    Mallon, Ron. The Construction of Human Kinds. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016. Pp. 272. $50.00.Katherine Ritchie - 2018 - Ethics 128 (2):478-482.
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  82.  42
    Getting Perspective on Objective Reasons.Mark Schroeder - 2018 - Ethics 128 (2):289-319.
    This article considers two important problems for the idea that what we ought to do is determined by the balance of competing reasons. The problems are distinct, but the object of the article is to explore how they admit of a single solution. It is a consequence of this solution that objective reasons—facts that count in favor—are in an important sense less objective than they have consistently been assumed to be. This raises but does not answer the question as to (...)
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  83.  18
    Mari Mikkola, The Wrong of Injustice: Dehumanization and Its Role in Feminist Philosophy.Natalie Stoljar - 2018 - Ethics 128 (2):483-487.
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  84.  6
    Mikkola, Mari. The Wrong of Injustice: Dehumanization and Its Role in Feminist Philosophy. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016. Pp. 298. $99.00 ; $35.00. [REVIEW]Natalie Stoljar - 2018 - Ethics 128 (2):483-487.
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  85.  18
    Causal Contributions and Liability.Victor Tadros - 2018 - Ethics 128 (2):402-431.
    This article explores the extent to which the magnitude of harm that a person is liable to suffer to avert a threat depends on the magnitude of her causal contribution to the threat. Several different versions of this view are considered. The conclusions are mostly skeptical—facts that may determine how large of a causal contribution a person makes to a threat are not morally significant, or not sufficiently significant to make an important difference to liability. However, understanding ways in which (...)
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  86.  12
    Must We Be Just Plain Good? On Regress Arguments for the Value of Humanity.L. Nandi Theunissen - 2018 - Ethics 128 (2):346-372.
    There is an argument according to which there must be something nonrelationally valuable for anything to be of value. The chains of dependence between values must come to an end, and humanity meets the specifications. I explore alternatives to terminating a regress in nonrelational value and give reason to reject the “borrowing” conception of relational value that drives the argument. I doubt that the nonrelational value of humanity can be secured by an argument from the structure of value, but I (...)
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  87.  7
    Tommie Shelby, Dark Ghettos: Injustice, Dissent, and Reform.Jonathan Wolff - 2018 - Ethics 128 (2):510-515.
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  88.  9
    Shelby, Tommie. Dark Ghettos: Injustice, Dissent, and Reform. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2016. Pp. 352. $29.95. [REVIEW]Jonathan Wolff - 2018 - Ethics 128 (2):510-515.
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