16 found

Year:

  1.  25
    Demoralizing Trust.Matthew Bennett - 2021 - Ethics 131 (3):511-538.
    What do we expect of those whom we trust? Some argue that when we trust we are confident the trusted will act on moral motivations. But often we trust without appraising the trusted’s moral qualiti...
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  2.  18
    Fischer, Bob. The Ethics of Eating Animals: Usually Bad, Sometimes Wrong, Often Permissible. New York: Routledge, 2019. Pp. 204. $160.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW]Justin Bernstein & Anne Barnhill - 2021 - Ethics 131 (3):605-610.
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  3.  7
    Quong, Jonathan. The Morality of Defensive Force. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2020. Pp. 240. $70.00 (Cloth).Joseph Bowen - 2021 - Ethics 131 (3):625-630.
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  4.  42
    Norcross, Alastair. Morality by Degrees: Reasons Without Demands. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2020. Pp. 176. $50.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW]Richard Yetter Chappell - 2021 - Ethics 131 (3):620-624.
  5.  35
    Epistemic Coercion.Sophia Dandelet - 2021 - Ethics 131 (3):489-510.
    In cases of self-gaslighting, the subject worries that other people will be skeptical of one of her beliefs—for instance, the belief that she has been sexually harassed. Prompted by this worry, she...
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  6. Racism as Civic Vice.Jeremy Fischer - 2021 - Ethics 131 (3):539-570.
    I argue that racism is essentially a civic character trait: to be a racist is to have a character that rationally reflects racial supremacist sociopolitical values. As with moral vice accounts of racism, character is my account’s primary evaluative focus: character is directly evaluated as racist, and all other racist things are racist insofar as, and because, they cause, are caused by, express or are otherwise suitably related to racist character. Yet as with political accounts of racism, sociopolitical considerations provide (...)
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  7. The Best Available Parent.Anca Gheaus - 2021 - Ethics 131 (3):431-459.
    There is a broad philosophical consensus that both children’s and prospective parents’ interests are relevant to the justification of a right to parent. Against this view, I argue that it is impermissible to sacrifice children’s interests for the sake of advancing adults’ interest in childrearing. Therefore, the allocation of the moral right to parent should track the child’s, and not the potential parent’s, interest. This revisionary thesis is moderated by two additional qualifications. First, parents lack the moral right to exclude (...)
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  8.  7
    Blake, Michael. Justice, Migration, and Mercy. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019. Pp. 280. $35.00 (Cloth).Matthew Lister - 2021 - Ethics 131 (3):600-605.
    For several years Michael Blake has been among the most important contributors to the philosophical literature on immigration. This book is therefore greatly anticipated, and develops a number of fruitful arguments. Although I will argue that the account is unsuccessful or incomplete at key points, it’s clearly an important work of relevance to those working on immigration, as well as to political philosophers more generally. In particular, Blake provides powerful arguments against the claim that “open borders” are required by liberal (...)
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  9.  47
    Review of Blake, Michael. Justice, Migration, and Mercy. [REVIEW]Matthew Lister - 2021 - Ethics 131 (3):600-605.
    The following is an unedited/copy edited version of a review to appear in Ethics. if citation is desired, please cite to the published version when it appears (April 2021). -/- For several years Michael Blake has been among the most important contributors to the philosophical literature on immigration. This book is therefore greatly anticipated, and develops a number of fruitful arguments. Although I will argue that the account is unsuccessful or incomplete at key points, it’s clearly an important work of (...)
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  10.  6
    Hunt, Lester H. The Philosophy of Henry Thoreau: Ethics, Politics, and Nature. New York: Bloomsbury, 2019. Pp. 184. $115.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW]Paul Muench - 2021 - Ethics 131 (3):615-620.
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  11. Utils and Shmutils.Jacob M. Nebel - 2021 - Ethics 131 (3):571-599.
    Matthew Adler's Measuring Social Welfare is an introduction to the social welfare function (SWF) methodology. This essay questions some ideas at the core of the SWF methodology having to do with the relation between the SWF and the measure of well-being. The facts about individual well-being do not single out a particular scale on which well-being must be measured. As with physical quantities, there are multiple scales that can be used to represent the same information about well-being; no one scale (...)
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  12.  7
    Goldberg, John C. P., and Zipursky, Benjamin C. Recognizing Wrongs. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2020. Pp. 392. $45.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW]Linda Radzik - 2021 - Ethics 131 (3):610-614.
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  13.  13
    Tiberius, Valerie. Well-Being as Value Fulfillment: How We Can Help Each Other to Live Well. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018. Pp. 240. $35.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW]Jason R. Raibley - 2021 - Ethics 131 (3):635-641.
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  14. Essentializing Language and the Prospects for Ameliorative Projects.Katherine Ritchie - 2021 - Ethics 131 (3):460-488.
    Some language encourages essentialist thinking. While philosophers have largely focused on generics and essentialism, I argue that nouns as a category are poised to refer to kinds and to promote representational essentializing. Our psychological propensity to essentialize when nouns are used reveals a limitation for anti-essentialist ameliorative projects. Even ameliorated nouns can continue to underpin essentialist thinking. I conclude by arguing that representational essentialism does not doom anti-essentialist ameliorative projects. Rather it reveals that would-be ameliorators ought to attend to the (...)
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  15.  24
    Schwenkler, John. Anscombe’s “Intention”: A Guide. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019. Pp. 272. $24.95 (Paper).Keshav Singh - 2021 - Ethics 131 (3):631-635.
  16.  11
    Coercion, Consent, and Time.Michelle Madden Dempsey - 2021 - Ethics 131 (2):345-368.
    This article sets out a framework for distinguishing three kinds of norms governing past sexual conduct and our responses to it: wrongfulness norms, excusability norms, and accountability norm...
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