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  1. Identity and Shared Humanity: Reflections on Amartya Sen's Memoir.Deen Chatterjee - 2022 - Ethics and International Affairs 36 (1):91-108.
    Amartya Sen's memoir, Home in the World, is a compelling read, giving a fascinating view of the making of the mind of one of the foremost public intellectuals of our time. In reflections on the first three decades of his life—all filled with an amazing range of experiences, encounters, and intellectual explorations that span Asia, Europe, and North America—Sen weaves a comprehensive and interlocking narrative that brings together a unitary worldview where two multi-dimensional themes are juxtaposed throughout the book: the (...)
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    Humane: How the United States Abandoned Peace and Reinvented War, Samuel Moyn (New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2021), 416 Pp., Cloth $30, Paperback $20, eBook $14.99. [REVIEW]Mary L. Dudziak - 2022 - Ethics and International Affairs 36 (1):109-111.
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  3.  1
    Should German Courts Prosecute Syrian International Crimes? Revisiting the “Dual Foundation” Thesis.Yuna Han - 2022 - Ethics and International Affairs 36 (1):37-63.
    Should Germany be prosecuting crimes committed in Syria pursuant to universal jurisdiction? This article revisits the normative questions raised by UJ—the principle that a state can prosecute serious international crimes such as genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes committed by foreigners outside of its territories—against the backdrop of increasing European UJ proceedings regarding Syrian conflict–related crimes, focusing on Germany as an illustrative example. While existing literature justifies UJ on the basis of universal prohibition of certain atrocities, this creates residual (...)
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  4. Delta Democracy: Pathways to Incremental Civic Revolution in Egypt and Beyond, Catherine E. Herrold (New York: Oxford University Press, 2020), 224 Pp., Cloth $105, Paperback $31.95, eBook $21.99. [REVIEW]James Ketterer - 2022 - Ethics and International Affairs 36 (1):114-117.
  5.  2
    Moral Injury and Revisionist Just War Theory.Jesse Kirkpatrick - 2022 - Ethics and International Affairs 36 (1):27-35.
    As part of the roundtable, “Moral Injury, Trauma, and War,” this essay explores the relationship between revisionist just war theory and moral injury. It proceeds in four sections. First, it offers a brief overview of the just war tradition, focusing on traditionalist and revisionist accounts, respectively. Next, it explores the relationship between moral injury and armed conflict. Then, it explores the links between moral injury and revisionist accounts of just war theory. Finally, by way of conclusion, the essay signals two (...)
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  6. The End Days of the Fourth Eelam War: Sri Lanka's Denialist Challenge to the Laws of War.Megan Price - 2022 - Ethics and International Affairs 36 (1):65-89.
    During the final months of Sri Lanka's 2006–2009 civil war, Sri Lankan armed forces engaged in a disproportionate and indiscriminate shelling campaign against the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam, which culminated in the deaths of tens of thousands of civilians. Conventional wisdom suggests that Sri Lanka undermined international humanitarian law. Significantly, however, the Sri Lankan government did not directly challenge such law or attempt to justify its departure from it. Rather, it invented a new set of facts about its conduct (...)
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  7.  1
    Moral Injury and the Lived Experience of Political Violence.Daniel Rothenberg - 2022 - Ethics and International Affairs 36 (1):15-25.
    Moral injury names how the lived experience of armed conflict can damage an individual's ethical foundations, often with serious consequences. While the term has gained increasing acceptance for the clinical treatment of veterans and as a means of better understanding the impact of war, it is generally applied to individualized trauma. As part of the roundtable, “Moral Injury, Trauma, and War,” this essay argues that moral injury is also a useful means of addressing political violence at a societal level. It (...)
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  8. The “Third” United Nations: How a Knowledge Ecology Helps the UN Think, Tatiana Carayannis and Thomas G. Weiss (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2021), 224 Pp., Cloth $85, eBook $84.99. [REVIEW]Michael J. Struett - 2022 - Ethics and International Affairs 36 (1):111-114.
  9. The War Is Over but the Moral Pain Continues.David Wood - 2022 - Ethics and International Affairs 36 (1):7-13.
    Almost five million Americans volunteered to serve in the U.S. armed forces between 2001 and 2021 and returned home as discharged veterans. Among them, 30,177 men and women have taken their own lives, an awful toll that is more than five times the number of Americans killed in combat in our twenty-first century wars. As part of the roundtable, “Moral Injury, Trauma, and War,” this essay argues that the reasons are many, but one major factor may be the moral pain (...)
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