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  1.  2
    Ecological Restorations as Practices of Moral Repair.Almassi Ben - 2017 - Ethics and the Environment 22 (1):19-40.
    The value of ecological restoration has seen considerable criticism and defense in environmental ethics over the past thirty years. Proponents stress the human and ecological benefits of restoration projects at their best; critics characterize restoration as impossible, arbitrary, domination or delusional. As ethical debates on ecological restoration developed and sometimes threatened to devolve into scholastic quibbling, pragmatists contributed a welcome perspective, as Light and others urged that those investigating restoration attend to its publicly relevant aspects. Most recently...
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  2.  3
    Intersectionality and the Changing Face of Ecofeminism.A. E. Kings - 2017 - Ethics and the Environment 22 (1):63-87.
    The term intersectionality, which is generally attributed to Kimberlé Crenshaw, began as a metaphorical and conceptual tool used to highlight the inability of a single-axis framework to capture the lived experiences of black women. Whilst many disciplines have used the ‘tools’ of intersectionality before 1989, modern day usage of the term is usually associated with Crenshaw’s specific approach. The development of Crenshaw’s intersectionality, originated from the failure of both feminist and anti-racist discourse; to represent and capture the specificity of the (...)
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  3.  1
    Lyric Details and Ecological Integrity.Heiti Warren - 2017 - Ethics and the Environment 22 (1):89-109.
    1. My topic is integrity, and the relation between an integrated structure and its component details. Let me begin with an image. The jazz trumpeter and composer Wynton Marsalis says: In American life, you have all of these different agendas, you have conflict all the time, and we’re attempting to achieve harmony through conflict. Which seems strange to say that, but it’s like an argument that you have with the intent to work something out, not an argument that you have (...)
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  4.  3
    Technology and/or Nature: Denatured/Renatured/Engineered/Artifacted Life?Holmes Rolston Iii - 2017 - Ethics and the Environment 22 (1):41-62.
    Technology involves artifacts, both in its etymology, from the Greek tekhne, “art” or “skill,” and in its central idea, the body of knowledge available to a culture for fashioning and using implements. This has so dramatically escalated in modern times, with the coupling of science and industry, that we have entered the first century in the 45 million centuries of life on Earth in which one species can aspire to manage the planet’s future. Since Galileo, Earth seemed a minor planet, (...)
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  5.  5
    Autonomous Pigs.David Judd & James Rocha - 2017 - Ethics and the Environment 22 (1):1-18.
    It is well established that nonhuman animals are sentient, have feelings, have desires, and are conscious. For many of us, some set of those points is sufficient to ground moral duties to nonhuman animals. Yet, others retain doubts about whether humans have such duties. Perhaps these doubters set even higher standards—standards that they believe nonhuman animals are incapable of meeting. The task of this paper is to consider how nonhuman animals fare against an incredibly high standard for moral duties: autonomy. (...)
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  6.  1
    Alienation and Nature in Environmental Philosophy by Simon Hailwood.Piers H. G. Stephens - 2017 - Ethics and the Environment 22 (1):111-118.
    Aldo Leopold once declared that there were two “spiritual dangers” in not owning a farm, with one being “the danger of supposing that breakfast comes from the grocery, and the other that heat comes from the furnace”. The dangers that Leopold was signaling were various, of course, but in that essay they primarily gathered around the problems caused by human distance from nature’s operations, the manners in which we can become divorced from the roots of life by a failure to (...)
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