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  1.  27
    Making Ecological Values Make Sense: Toward More Operationalizable Ecological Legislation.Justin Donhauser - 2016 - Ethics and the Environment 21 (2):1-25.
    Value claims about ecological entities, their functionality, and properties take center stage in so-called “ecological” ethical and aesthetic theories. For example, the claim that the biodiversity in an old-growth forest imbues it with “value in and for itself” is an explicit value claim about an ecological property. And the claim that one can study “the aesthetics of nature, including natural objects...such as ecosystems” presupposes that natural instances of a type of ecological entity exist and can be regarded as more or (...)
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  2.  6
    Dignity and Its Violation Examined Within the Context of Animal Ethics.Humphreys Rebekah - 2016 - Ethics and the Environment 21 (2):143-162.
    The word ‘dignity’ may be used in a presentational sense, for example, one might say “she presents herself with dignity”, or in a social sense, for example, one might say “she fulfilled her duty with dignity, or honour.” However, in this paper I will not be using ‘dignity’ in either of these senses. Rather, the sense of dignity I will be concerned with is one that is related to ideas about the value or worth of a being. This latter sense (...)
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  3.  2
    Don't Organize, Mourn: Environmental Loss and Musicking.Mark Andrew - 2016 - Ethics and the Environment 21 (2):51-77.
    The environmentalist’s condition can be one of loss, the perception of a depleted and polluted environment as a product of modern consumption. Compounding this grief, some environmental losses loom as unrecognizable or beyond our immediate perception. Capitalism responds to this obscure loss by offering consumption and development, perhaps of a green variety, as a panacea for pain. This paper concerns the capacities of making music, as an activity and process, to help recognize and respond to present environmentally destructive patterns of (...)
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  4. A Defense of Integrity as a Conservation Concept.J. Michael Scoville - 2016 - Ethics and the Environment 21 (2):79-117.
    An environmental ethic needs to have an answer to two basic questions: what nature should we care about, and why? A number of proposals have been made about how to answer these questions. In this paper, I consider in detail one such proposal, namely, biological or ecological integrity. Different characterizations of integrity can be found in the literature, but I will treat the following one as paradigmatic. Integrity refers to a property of landscapes that are relatively unmodified by human activity (...)
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  5.  1
    Farming Dwelling Thinking.Strong David - 2016 - Ethics and the Environment 21 (2):27-50.
    In his writings, McKibben confronts us with a fundamental choice. The choice is not whether to drill ever deeper, deep-water oil wells or invest in further exploration for new oil fields because we will be running out of fossil fuel, as he argues. Nor is the choice whether to burn cleaner coal. The choice is not even whether to develop more efficient and less polluting technologies, more fuel-efficient and cleaner-burning automobiles, for instance, or whether to recycle or develop wind and (...)
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  6. Generous Being: The Environmental-Ethical Relevance of Ontological Gratitude.Francis van den Noortgaete - 2016 - Ethics and the Environment 21 (2):119-142.
    Despite substantial effort, environmental ethics and policy find their aspirations curtailed by what has been denoted as the value-action gap, the discrepancy between values held, and actual behavior. This gap represents a major challenge to adequately address the environmental changes currently confronting us, including a high rate of biodiversity loss, verging on major extinction.1 Yet current policy and educational efforts worldwide appear insufficient to alter individual behavior to a degree that could slow down, let alone reverse, worrying trends registered and (...)
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  7. Engaging Nature: Environmentalism and the Canon Ed. By Peter Cannavò and Joseph Lane Jr.Ashley Dodsworth - 2016 - Ethics and the Environment 21 (1):119-137.
    In his review of the field of environmental political theory in The Politics of Nature, Andrew Dobson suggested that one way for the discipline to develop was through an engagement with the history of political thought, through “bringing previously buried political theorists to our attention… forcing us to reassess the work of canonical theorists”. Over ten years after Dobson’s initial suggestion, John Meyer notes that this approach had flourished as “a new generation of political theorists” engaged in this project and (...)
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  8.  22
    Ecological Nature: A Non-Dualistic Concept for Rethinking Humankind's Place in the World.Antoine C. Dussault - 2016 - Ethics and the Environment 21 (1):1-37.
    In a series of papers, J. Baird Callicott criticizes the wilderness concept of nature and the associated approach to environmentalism which focuses on the preservation of areas of land free of human intervention. As he notes, this concept rests on a human/nature dualism which defines the natural in opposition to the cultural and the artefactual, and thus in principle places humans outside the natural realm. This makes it conceptually impossible for humans to intervene in nature without denaturing it. Callicott rejects (...)
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  9.  1
    Is Broad the New Deep in Environmental Ethics?: A Comparison of Broad Ecological Justice and Deep Ecology.Teea Kortetmäki - 2016 - Ethics and the Environment 21 (1):89-108.
    There are different views on which issues can be considered as questions of justice. Until rather recently, the distributive paradigm, or the view that justice is primarily and mostly an issue of distributing certain goods, has dominated the discussion in social justice. Today, distributive paradigm has been challenged by the idea that justice also has other important dimensions such as recognition—the ‘cultural’ dimension of justice that concerns respect and social relations—and participation, the ‘political’ dimension. I propose that this multidimensional approach (...)
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  10.  2
    Environmental Skill: Motivation, Knowledge, and the Possibility of a Non-Romantic Environmental Ethics by Mark Coeckelbergh.Lisa Kretz - 2016 - Ethics and the Environment 21 (1):109-118.
    In Environmental Skill: Motivation, Knowledge, and the Possibility of a Non-Romantic Environmental Ethics, Mark Coeckelbergh presents an expansive approach to rethinking the ontological, epistemic, and ethical relationships humans have with the environment. It is a book with a wide historical scope rooted in the Western tradition, and it seeks to address the gap between humans’ ecological ideals and environmental practices.The text begins with an exploration of the psychological conditions for environmental change. Coeckelbergh seeks to bridge the gap between what we (...)
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  11.  34
    Environmental Philosophy as A Way of Life.Toby Svoboda - 2016 - Ethics and the Environment 21 (1):39-60.
    Environmental philosophy is particularly well-suited to facilitate a revival of a philosophical art of living, or the practice of philosophy as a way of life. The notion that philosophy involves the practice of living well is most often associated with Hellenistic figures, but it is also present in some modern philosophical writers. However, despite interest in this tradition of philosophy from the likes of Michel Foucault, Martha Nussbaum, and Pierre Hadot, the practice of philosophy as a way of life is (...)
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  12.  2
    The Republican Zoopolis: Towards A New Legitimation Framework for Relational Animal Ethics.Erica von Essen & Michael P. Allen - 2016 - Ethics and the Environment 21 (1):61-88.
    An alternative to the negative rights slant in animal rights, focusing on abolition and hands-off approaches, has now surfaced within critical animal studies. Indeed, Relational Animal Rights Theory lays a foundation for positive relations of care, mutuality and dependence between species. In so doing, the theory is sensitive to the multitude of ways in which human and non-human animals interact across shared territories. Perhaps the most fruitful development with RART is offered by Donaldson and Kymlicka, insofar as it extends a (...)
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