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  1.  4
    Animal Welfare and Environmental Ethics: It's Complicated.Ian J. Campbell - 2018 - Ethics and the Environment 23 (1):49.
    Consider Dave, an altruistic software developer whose monthly charitable contributions include Oxfam, Friends of Animals, and the Sierra Club. Dave's contributions to Oxfam suggest that he values human life and welfare. His support for Friends of Animals, moreover, indicates that he does not restrict his welfare concerns to humans—Dave is no anthropocentrist. Finally, his contributions to the Sierra Club show that he values nature and wants to see it preserved, untrammeled by human beings. At first glance, Dave's support for Friends (...)
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  2.  1
    Mourning Nature: Hope at the Heart of Ecological Grief and Loss Ed. By Ashlee Cunsolo and Karen Landman.Alan E. Stewart - 2018 - Ethics and the Environment 23 (1):79-86.
    If C.S. Lewis' A Grief Observed can be considered an account of a lost human relationship, then Cunsolo and Landman's Mourning Nature forms a posthuman, but nonetheless personal, examination of the losses of relationships with plants, animals, and even entire ecosystems—an ecological grief observed. In this regard, one of the motivations for this book was Cunsolo's interviews with Inuit residents who experienced profound sadness and despair at the changes in the landscape brought by climate change. Beyond this, each of the (...)
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  3. Replacement and Irreversibility: The Problem with Ecological Restoration as Moral Repair.Eric Katz - 2018 - Ethics and the Environment 23 (1):17.
    Should the process of ecological restoration be considered a type of moral reparation? Defenders of the restoration process have recently proposed an affirmative answer to this question. The idea itself is not new. Paul Taylor considered the possibility of reparations to the natural world in his seminal work in environmental ethics, Respect for Nature, although Taylor was not directly considering the process of ecological restoration as the means to secure the reparations. In a recent issue of this journal, Ben Almassi (...)
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  4.  1
    Ecological Crisis and the Problem of How to Inhabit a Norm.Simon Lumsden - 2018 - Ethics and the Environment 23 (1):29.
    Dale Jamieson's recent work, Reason in a Dark Time: Why the Struggle Against Climate Change Failed and What it Means for our Future, explores the reasons why attempts to develop a global response to anthropogenic climate change have been unsuccessful.1 One contribution to this failure is the inability of moral philosophy to redefine the actions and behaviors of individuals that are currently considered relatively unremarkable practices of western life as immoral. Arguments attempting to establish grounds for moral judgment that would (...)
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  5.  6
    Debating Climate Ethics by Stephen M. Gardiner and David A. Weisbach.Joshua D. McBee - 2018 - Ethics and the Environment 23 (1):71-77.
    Stephen Gardiner and David Weisbach's recent Debating Climate Ethics takes up an urgent and important question: is ethics relevant to climate policy? Or rather, the book takes up several, closely related versions of that question we do well to distinguish clearly: 1 Are ethical considerations relevant to climate policy? 2 Do ethical theories philosophers defend have implications regarding climate policy? 3 Does climate ethics provide policy analysts any useful guidance? Or, in other words, should climate policy analysts pay any attention (...)
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  6.  3
    Loving an Unfamiliar World: Dementia, Mental Illness, and Climate Change.Katie McShane - 2018 - Ethics and the Environment 23 (1):1.
    As the pace of climate change accelerates, the world around us is becoming increasingly inhospitable, unpredictable, and unfamiliar. Our future looks as though it will be one of even more drastic environmental change. It is worth thinking about what it will be like to live in such a world: how will creatures like us, with psychologies that are perhaps better suited to more predictability, cope? How might we need to change in order to adjust to a rapidly changing environment? One (...)
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