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  1.  2
    The Importance of Nature, Green Spaces, and Gardens in Human Well-Being.Isis Brook - 2010 - Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (3):295-312.
    Comparing the nature encounters of Gerald Durrell with our current climate of 'stranger danger', health and safety neurosis, and the beguilement and blunting of the senses by technological advances presents a worrying picture of a new era of nature and culture deprivation. However, even in the most unlikely places, a rich engagement with nature can be rekindled. Central to such recovery is access to nearby nature that allows practical engagement rather than merely detached on-looking. In my conclusion I outline examples (...)
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  2.  1
    NIMBY Claims, Free Riders and Universalisability.G. K. D. Crozier & Christopher Hajzler - 2010 - Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (3):317-320.
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  3.  5
    NIMBY and the Ethics of the Particular.Martin Drenthen - 2010 - Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (3):321-323.
    In “Why Not NIMBY?” Derek Turner and Simon Feldman fail to address that many NIMBY protesters are not just concerned with concrete decision making, but also introduce a ‘metaphysical’ issue that liberal-democracy considers an inappropriate subject for the political debate. The type of rationality dominating political discourse requires one to reason in terms of 'common good' or personal preferences that can be weighted against other preferences. NIMBY’s do neither; rather they reframe the debate, starting from a radically different approach to (...)
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  4.  3
    Why Not NIMBY?Simon Feldman & Derek Turner - 2010 - Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (3):251-266.
    This paper examines a particularly egregious example of a NIMBY claim and considers three proposals for explaining what about that claim might be ethically problematic: The NIMBY claimant is being selfish or self-serving; The NIMBY claim cannot be morally justified, because respecting everyone's NIMBY claims leaves communities worse off; and if policymakers were to defer to people's NIMBY claims, they would end up perpetuating environmental injustices. We argue that these proposals fail to explain why there is anything wrong with the (...)
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  5. Why Not NIMBY? A Response, Reviewing the Empirical Evidence.C. Haggett - 2010 - Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (3):313-316.
     
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  6.  1
    A Call for Clarity and a Review of the Empirical Evidence: Comment on Felman and Turner's ‘Why Not NIMBY?’.Claire Haggett - 2010 - Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (3):313-316.
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  7.  3
    Anne Frank's Tree: Thoughts on Domination and the Paradox of Progress.Eric Katz - 2010 - Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (3):283-293.
    Consider the significance of Anne Frank's horse chestnut tree. During her years of hiding in the secret annex, Anne thought of the tree as a symbol of freedom, happiness, and peace. As a stand-in for all of Nature, Anne saw the tree as that part of the universe that could not be destroyed by human evil. In this essay, I use Anne's tree as a starting point for a discussion of the domination of both nature and humanity. I connect the (...)
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  8.  1
    Hypocrisy, NIMBY, and the Politics ofEverybody'sBackyard.John M. Meyer - 2010 - Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (3):325-327.
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  9.  2
    Defending Place in the Google Earth Age.Roopali Phadke - 2010 - Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (3):267-281.
    Virtual globes, like Google Earth, are increasingly being used by experts and lay publics in the process of 'defending place' against rapidly shifting energy geographies. Drawing upon the fields of visual studies, landscape architecture and geography, this article examines the use of geospatial tools by conservation campaigns challenging new developments. With a focus on wind energy, the article describes the strategic advantages and risks associated with using virtual globes in campaign work. The article suggests that conservation campaigns need to make (...)
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  10.  1
    NIMBY, Agent-Relative Reasons and Public Reason: An Open Peer Commentary on Simon Feldman and Derek Turner's ‘Why Not NIMBY?’.Kenneth Shockley - 2010 - Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (3):329-332.
    NIMBY claims have certainly been vilified. But, as Feldman and Turner point out, one cannot condemn all NIMBY claims without condemning all appeals to partiality. This suggests that any moral problem with NIMBY claims stems not from their status as NIMBY claims but from an underlying illegitimate appeal to partiality. I suggest that if we are to distinguish illegitimate from legitimate appeals to partiality we should look to what might morally justify the sort of agent-relative reasons that can be expressed (...)
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  11.  1
    Humans in the Land. The Ethics and Aesthetics of the Cultural Landscape ISBN 978-82-7477-343-1.Stephen Trudgill - 2010 - Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (3):337-339.
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  12.  1
    Why Not Environmental Injustice?Kyle Powys Whyte - 2010 - Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (3):333-336.
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  13.  2
    The Situation of the Most Vulnerable Countries After Copenhagen.Paul Baer - 2010 - Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (2):223-228.
  14.  1
    Ethical Limitations of the Copenhagen Accord: A Response to Development Ethics and the Copenhagen Accord: How Important Are the Global Poor? By Allen Thompson.Donald A. Brown - 2010 - Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (2):197-206.
  15.  2
    Some Problems and Possibilities of Caring.Rosie Cox - 2010 - Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (2):113-130.
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  16. Ethical Doings in Naturecultures.de la Bellacasa Maria Puig - 2010 - Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (2):151-169.
    What new forms of ethical engagement are emerging in naturecultural worlds? In this paper I explore the example of the practical ethics of the permaculture movement. I put these in dialogue first with new approaches to ethics in biopolitics and naturecultures and second with a reading of feminist care ethics. Across this discussion I focus on the potential of ethos transformations experienced through everyday doings to promote ethical obligations of care. If we are living in a naturecultural world where politics (...)
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  17. Ethical Doings in Naturecultures.de la Bellacasa MaríA. Puig - 2010 - Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (2):151-169.
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  18.  2
    Home, Work and the Shifting Geographies of Care.Kim England - 2010 - Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (2):131-150.
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  19.  1
    Climate Policy is Dead, Long Live Climate Politics!Gert Goeminne - 2010 - Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (2):207-214.
    In this commentary, the author argues that the alleged failure of the Copenhagen climate summit in December 2009, and in particular the role played by the developing countries, should be embraced as a political accomplishment opening up a moment of political opportunity. Admittedly Copenhagen was a political failure, albeit of a populist consensual policy practice that invokes the semi-scientific threat of an apocalyptic doomsday scenario to make everybody toe the line of the neo-liberal market economy. Now that we are at (...)
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  20.  1
    Misplaced Ethics of Climate Change: Political Vs. Environmental Geography.Paul G. Harris - 2010 - Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (2):215-222.
  21.  21
    Place Geography and the Ethics of Care: Introductory Remarks on the Geographies of Ethics, Responsibility and Care.Cheryl McEwan & Michael K. Goodman - 2010 - Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (2):103-112.
    In a recent review article, Jeff Popke (2006, p. 510) calls for a ?more direct engagement with theories of ethics and responsibility? on the part of human geographers, and for a reinscription of the social as a site of ethics and responsibility. This requires that we also continue to develop ways of thinking through our responsibilities toward unseen others?both unseen neighbours and distant others?and to cultivate a renewed sense of social interconnectedness. Popke suggests that a feminist-inspired ethic of care might (...)
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  22.  1
    When Foods Become Animals: Ruminations on Ethics and Responsibility in Care-Fullpractices of Consumption.Mara Miele & Adrian Evans - 2010 - Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (2):171-190.
    Providing information to consumers in the form of food labels about modern systems of animal farming is believed to be crucial for increasing their awareness of animal suffering and for promoting technological change towards more welfare-friendly forms of husbandry. In this paper we want to explore whether and how food labels carrying information about the lives of animals are used by consumers while shopping for meat and other animal foods. In order to achieve this, we draw upon a series of (...)
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  23.  3
    Otto Wagner's Modern Architecture.Roger Paden - 2010 - Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (2):229-246.
    Wagner is thought to be one of the first Modern Architects, yet a number of writers have argued that his most famous Modern building, the “Postsparkasse,” violates the most basic principles of Modern Architecture; principles that Wagner himself helped develop. This essay develops a new interpretation of this building by placing it in the context of fin de sicle Viennese culture. This interpretation shows that the “Postsparkasse” is a Modern building, but it also shows that the common understanding of “Modern (...)
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  24.  1
    Ethical Doings in Naturecultures.María Puig de la Bellacasa - 2010 - Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (2):151-169.
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  25.  1
    Development Ethics and the Copenhagen Accord: How Important Are the Global Poor?Allen Thompson - 2010 - Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (2):191-196.
  26.  25
    Exemplars in Environmental Ethics: Taking Seriously the Lives of Thoreau, Leopold, Dillard and Abbey.Nathan Andersen - 2010 - Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (1):43 – 55.
    It is argued that certain individuals can and should be considered 'morally exemplary' with respect to the environment. This can be so even where there is no universally applicable ethical principle they employ, and no canonical set of virtues they exhibit. The author identifies Henry David Thoreau, Aldo Leopold, Annie Dillard and Edward Abbey as potential 'environmental exemplars,' focusing for the purposes of the essay on individuals who have written compelling autobiographical works in defense of a way of life that (...)
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  27.  62
    A Shallow Route to Environmentally Friendly Happiness: Why Evidence That We Are Shallow Materialists Need Not Be Bad News for the Environment(Alist).Chrisoula Andreou - 2010 - Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (1):1 – 10.
    It is natural to assume that we would not be willing to compromise the environment if the conveniences and luxuries thereby gained did not have a substantial positive impact on our happiness. But there is room for skepticism and, in particular, for the thesis that we are compromising the environment to no avail in that our conveniences and luxuries are not having a significant impact on our happiness, making the costs incurred for them a waste. One way of defending the (...)
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  28.  14
    Getting to Less.Philip Cafaro - 2010 - Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (1):11 – 14.
    Chrisoula Andreou's “No Avail Thesis” states that many environmentally-harmful conveniences and luxuries do not significantly contribute to human happiness, making the costs they incur largely a waste. The first half of this short paper affirms the ethical importance of this thesis, with special reference to global climate change. Growing evidence suggests that implementing efficiency measures will not be sufficient to allow humanity to avoid catastrophic climate change and that such measures will have to be supplemented by reductions in consumption itself. (...)
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  29.  24
    Classical Liberalism and American Landscape Representation: The Imperial Self in Nature.Frank M. Coleman - 2010 - Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (1):75 – 96.
    Here it is shown that 'vacant nature' is deployed as sign in Anglo-American landscape representation of the seventeenth to nineteenth centuries to support a Cartesian imaginary of spatial extension. The referent of this imaginary is variously denoted as 'America' (John Locke), the 'north west' (Jefferson), the 'wilderness' (Ralph Waldo Emerson), and the 'frontier' (Frederick Jackson Turner) but throughout it is essentially the same 'vacant' landscape; its function is to produce a site and space of appearance for an imperial self, an (...)
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  30.  8
    Social Insecurity and the No-Avail Thesis: Insights From Philosophy and Economic History on Consumerist Behavior.David K. Goodin - 2010 - Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (1):15 – 18.
    Chrisoula Andreou argues that the predominant factor in the exalted and worldly views of human thriving involves a psychological measure of relative deprivation or advantage in relation to social competitors. This is the 'no avail' thesis: promoting self-sacrifice for the sake of conservation, in-and-of-itself, will remain ineffective as environmental policy. However, Andreou sets aside, to some extent, the applicability of philosophical discourse on happiness and human thriving, which is where this commentary is directed. Specifically, Aristotle's insights on social prestige (exousia) (...)
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  31.  15
    The Habitual Route to Environmentally Friendly (or Unfriendly) Happiness.Cheryl Hall - 2010 - Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (1):19 – 22.
    I agree with Andreou that people are 'highly adaptable when it comes to material goods.' But I would supplement her point about the influence of social comparisons on experiences of happiness with a point about the influence of habit. Andreou does briefly mention habituation, arguing that 'a good will give one less happiness once one has gotten used to having it.' While this may be true, though, it is also true that one's sense of how necessary a good is to (...)
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  32.  10
    Comment on Andreou.Joseph Heath - 2010 - Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (1):23 – 26.
    This comment takes issue with the opposition that Andreou draws between the “exalted” and the “worldly” view. It argues instead for a distinction between “miswanting” and “competitive consumption” as rival explanations for the failure of economic growth to increase average levels of subjectively reported happiness in developed nations. It ends with a caution against over-reliance upon happiness research as an argument for environmentally-motivated constraints on growth.
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  33.  72
    Environmental Ethics From the Japanese Perspective.Midori Kagawa-Fox - 2010 - Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (1):57 – 73.
    The subject of Western environmental ethics has been widely written about and discussed but the same can not be said of 'Japanese' environmental ethics. This discipline has not been covered in any branch of Japanese philosophy nor has there been sufficient pressure exerted by ecologists on Japanese thinkers and writers to explain how the Japanese code addresses environmental concerns. Although some Japanese scholars have in the past articulated their ideas on working with the natural world, the field covering the spirit (...)
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  34.  16
    Materialism and Economics.Christopher Morgan-Knapp - 2010 - Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (1):27 – 30.
    Chrisoula Andreou argues that even if our happiness is determined by our material standard of living, our standard of living could be lowered without lowering our happiness. In this response, I show how this claim can be challenged on both conceptual and empirical grounds. Conceptually, how justified we are in believing her claim depends on how we conceive of the 'we' it refers to. Empirically, there is economic evidence in tension with each of the several interpretations her position admits of. (...)
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  35.  13
    Apotheosis of the Hungry God: Nihilism and the Contours of Scholarship.Jonathan M. Smith - 2010 - Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (1):31 – 41.
    The modern university is a demoralizing institution, largely devoted to the propagation of nihilism and liberation of desire. The apotheosis of this hungry god of the untrammeled will has taken more than 200 years, but the slow ascent has given humanistic scholarship its basic shape. The ascent of 'reason' over tradition and religion, at the end of the eighteenth century, caused conservative thought to emerge, reluctantly, and frame rational defenses of natural (i.e. spontaneously evolved) social institutions and belief systems. This (...)
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