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  1.  5
    No Morality, No Self: Anscombe's Radical Skepticism, by James Doyle. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2018, 238 P., ISBN 13: 978-0-674-97650-4, Hbk $41. [REVIEW]Valérie Aucouturier - 2021 - European Journal of Philosophy 29 (1):266-269.
  2.  21
    Ryle on Knowing How: Some Clarifications and Corrections.Stefan Brandt - 2021 - European Journal of Philosophy 29 (1):152-167.
    European Journal of Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  3.  35
    P. F. Strawson Was Neither an Externalist nor an Internalist About Moral Responsibility.Benjamin De Mesel - 2021 - European Journal of Philosophy 29 (1):199-214.
    Internalism about moral responsibility is the view that moral responsibility is determined primarily by an agent's mental states; externalism is the view that moral responsibility is determined primarily by an agent's overt behaviour and by circumstances external to the agent. In a series of papers, Michelle Ciurria has argued that most if not all current accounts of moral responsibility, including Strawsonian ones, are internalist. Ciurria defends externalism against these accounts, and she argues that, in contrast to his contemporary followers, P.F. (...)
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  4.  2
    Schelling's Philosophy: Freedom, Nature and Systematicity, Edited by G. Anthony Bruno. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2020, Xii + 252 Pp., ISBN 978-0-19-881281-4, Hb £55.00. [REVIEW]Peter Dews - 2021 - European Journal of Philosophy 29 (1):274-278.
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  5.  78
    The Gender Puzzles.Iskra Fileva - 2021 - European Journal of Philosophy 29 (1):182-198.
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  6.  4
    Civilization and the Culture of Science: Science and the Shaping of Modernity, 1795–1935, by Stephen Gaukroger. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 2020, 544 Pp., ISBN: 978-0-19-884907-0, $50.00. [REVIEW]Gabriel Finkelstein - 2021 - European Journal of Philosophy 29 (1):256-259.
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  7.  13
    The Habermas‐Rawls Debate, by James Gordon Finlayson. New York, NY: Columbia University Press, 2019, Xi + 294pp., ISBN 13: 978‐0‐231‐16410‐8 Hb, ISBN 13: 978‐0‐231‐16411‐5 Pb, $105.00 Hb/$35.00 Pb. [REVIEW]Jeffrey Flynn - 2021 - European Journal of Philosophy 29 (1):270-273.
    European Journal of Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  8.  29
    A New Theory of Absence Experience.Laura Gow - 2021 - European Journal of Philosophy 29 (1):168-181.
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  9.  12
    Climate Change, Distributive Justice, and “Pre‐Institutional” Limits on Resource Appropriation.Colin Hickey - 2021 - European Journal of Philosophy 29 (1):215-235.
    In this paper I argue that individuals are, prior to the existence of just institutions requiring that they do so, bound as a matter of global distributive justice to restrict their use, or share the benefits fairly of any use beyond their entitlements, of the Earth’s capacity to absorb greenhouse gases (EAC) to within a specified justifiable range. As part of the search for an adequate account of climate morality, I approach the task by revisiting, and drawing inspiration from, two (...)
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  10.  7
    Merleau-Ponty on Painting and the Problem of Reflection.Emma C. Jerndal - 2021 - European Journal of Philosophy 29 (1):74-89.
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  11.  70
    Nature, Corruption, and Freedom: Stoic Ethics in Kant's Religion.Melissa Merritt - 2021 - European Journal of Philosophy 29 (1):3-24.
    Kant’s account of “the radical evil in human nature” in the 1793 Religion within the Bounds of Reason Alone is typically interpreted as a reworking of the Augustinian doctrine of original sin. But Kant doesn’t talk about Augustine explicitly there, and if he is rehabilitating the doctrine of original sin, the result is not obviously Augustinian. Instead Kant talks about Stoic ethics in a pair of passages on either end of his account of radical evil, and leaves other clues that (...)
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  12. Is Identity Illusory?Andreas L. Mogensen - 2021 - European Journal of Philosophy 29 (1):55-73.
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  13.  9
    Spinoza on Learning to Live Together, by Susan James. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2020, Pp. Viii + 228, ISBN: 9780198713074, $70.00 Hbk. [REVIEW]Steven Nadler - 2021 - European Journal of Philosophy 29 (1):252-255.
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  14.  17
    Moral Psychology with Nietzsche, by Brian Leiter. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019, 224 Pp., ISBN: 9780199696505, Hardcover $65.00. [REVIEW]Alexander Prescott-Couch - 2021 - European Journal of Philosophy 29 (1):260-265.
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  15.  19
    The Normative Bond Between Kantian Autonomy and Sartrean Authenticity: A Critical Existentialist Perspective.Maria Russo - 2021 - European Journal of Philosophy 29 (1):43-54.
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  16.  71
    A Thousand Pleasures Are Not Worth a Single Pain: The Compensation Argument for Schopenhauer's Pessimism.Byron Simmons - 2021 - European Journal of Philosophy 29 (1):120-136.
    Pessimism is, roughly, the view that life is not worth living. In chapter 46 of the second volume of The World as Will and Representation, Arthur Schopenhauer provides an oft-neglected argument for this view. The argument is that a life is worth living only if it does not contain any uncompensated evils; but since all our lives happen to contain such evils, none of them are worth living. The now standard interpretation of this argument (endorsed by Kuno Fischer and Christopher (...)
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  17. Idealism and Illusions.Robert Smithson - 2021 - European Journal of Philosophy 29 (1):137-151.
    According to the idealist, facts about phenomenal experience determine facts about the physical world. Any such view must account for illusions: cases where there is a discrepancy between the physical world and our experiences of it. In this paper, I critique some recent idealist treatments of illusions before presenting my own preferred account. I then argue that, initial impressions notwithstanding, it is actually the realist who has difficulties properly accounting for illusions.
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  18.  12
    On Religious and Cultural Objects: Articulate and Inarticulate Bodies in Spinoza's Philosophy of Nature.Christopher Thomas - 2021 - European Journal of Philosophy 29 (1):90-104.
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  19.  68
    Dynamis and Energeia in Aristotle's Metaphysics.Hikmet Unlu - 2021 - European Journal of Philosophy 29 (1):1-15.
    This paper offers an interpretation of Aristotle’s concepts of dynamis and energeia (commonly translated as potentiality and actuality), and of the thematic progression of Metaphysics IX. I first raise the question of where motion fits in Aristotle’s categories and argue that the locus of motion in the system of categories are the categories of doing and suffering, in which case dynamis and energeia in respect of motion can also be understood as the dynamis and energeia of doing and suffering. Next, (...)
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  20.  53
    Ought Implies Can, Asymmetrical Freedom, and the Practical Irrelevance of Transcendental Freedom.Matthé Scholten - 2021 - European Journal of Philosophy 1 (1):1-18.
    In this paper, I demonstrate that Kant's commitment to an asymmetry between the control conditions for praise and blame is explained by his endorsement of the principle Ought Implies Can (OIC). I argue that Kant accepts only a relatively weak version of OIC and that he is hence committed only to a relatively weak requirement of alternate possibilities for moral blame. This suggests that whether we are transcendentally free is irrelevant to questions about moral permissibility and moral blameworthiness.
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