Year:

  1.  7
    What is It to Depsychologize Psychology?Stina Bäckström - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (2):358-375.
    In this essay, I distinguish two ways of depsychologizing psychology: ‘anti-psychologism’ and ‘non-psychologism’. Both positions are responses to the Fregean sharp distinction between the logical and the psychological. But where anti-psychologism, which I find in John McDowell, attempts to overcome the sharp distinction by arguing that psychological states and their expressions are apt to be articulated into judgments, Stanley Cavell's non-psychologism, a powerful and neglected alternative, wants to overcome the sharp distinction by abandoning judgment as the paradigm expression of thought (...)
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  2.  2
    Hegel's Theory of Responsibility, by MarkAlznauer. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015, X + 218 Pp. ISBN: 978-1-10-707812-3 Hb £60.00. [REVIEW]Barba-Kay Antón - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (2):554-559.
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  3.  2
    Hegel's Theory of Responsibility, by Mark Alznauer. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015, X + 218 Pp. ISBN: 978‐1‐10‐707812‐3 Hb £60.00. [REVIEW]Barba‐Kay Antón - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (2):554-559.
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  4.  2
    Motivational Indeterminacy.Avner Baz - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (2):336-357.
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  5.  2
    Joint Action and the Expression of Shared Intentions: An Expanded Taylorian Account.Bowden Sean - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (2):440-462.
    After having identified several shortcomings of the so-called ‘standard accounts’ of shared intentions, this paper will develop a novel framework for understanding such intentions. The framework to be advanced hinges on a notion of ‘expression’, as well as on the claim that shared intentions are expressed—that is, manifested, grasped, shaped and clarified—throughout the unfolding of the joint actions they animate, as well as in the various expressive activities and behaviours that accompany joint action. This claim will be defended with particular (...)
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  6.  3
    Wittgenstein, Theories of Meaning, and Linguistic Disjunctivism.Silver Bronzo - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (2).
    This paper argues that Wittgenstein opposed theories of meaning, and did so for good reasons. Theories of meaning, in the sense discussed here, are attempts to explain what makes it the case that certain sounds, shapes, or movements are meaningful linguistic expressions. It is widely believed that Wittgenstein made fundamental contributions to this explanatory project. I argue, by contrast, that in both his early and later works, Wittgenstein endorsed a disjunctivist conception of language which rejects the assumption underlying the question (...)
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  7.  2
    The Double Intentionality of Emotional Experience.Tom Cochrane - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (2).
    I argue that while the feeling of bodily responses is not necessary to emotion, these feelings contribute significant meaningful content to everyday emotional experience. Emotional bodily feelings represent a ‘state of self’, analysed as a sense of one's body affording certain patterns of interaction with the environment. Recognising that there are two sources of intentional content in everyday emotional experience allows us to reconcile the diverging intuitions that people have about emotional states, and to understand better the long-standing debate between (...)
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  8.  1
    Heidegger, Art, and the Overcoming of Metaphysics.Matt Dill - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (2):294-311.
    In this paper, I advance a new interpretation of Heidegger's reflections on art as we find them in his essay, ‘The Origin of the Work of Art’. I begin, in Section 1, by uncovering the fundamental concern that motivates Heidegger's essay. I show that Heidegger's reflections on art are part of his attempt to uncover a path beyond the history of metaphysics. I then suggest, in Section 2, that while Heidegger does think that art may allow for the overcoming of (...)
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  9.  3
    The View From Here: On Affirmation, Attachment, and the Limits of Regret, by R. Jay Wallace. Oxford University Press, 2013, 288 Pp. ISBN: 978‐0‐19‐994135‐3 Hb £30.49. [REVIEW]Elianna Fetterolf - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (2):559-564.
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  10.  2
    A Whole Lot of Misery: Adorno's Negative Aristotelianism.Freyenhagen Fabian - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (2).
    To read Adorno as a negativist Aristotelian was always going to be controversial. It is, thus, unsurprising that the common critical concern running through the three reviews assembled here is the Aristotelianism I ascribe to Adorno. I am immensely grateful for these generous and thoughtful contributions, and in what follows I will try to do justice to the concerns they raise. I focus on the ascription of Aristotelianism as the major concern, but I also discuss related and wider comments, regarding (...)
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  11.  3
    Realizing the Good: Hegel's Critique of Kantian Morality.Nicolás García Mills - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (2).
    Although the best-known Hegelian objection against Kant's moral philosophy is the charge that the categorical imperative is an ‘empty formalism’, Hegel's criticisms also include what we might call the realizability objection. Tentatively stated, the realizability objection says that within the sphere of Kantian morality, the good remains an unrealizable ‘ought’ – in other words, the Kantian moral ‘ought’ can never become an ‘is’. In this paper, I attempt to come to grips with this objection in two steps. In the first (...)
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  12.  2
    Theorising From the Global Standpoint: Kant and Grotius on Original Common Possession of the Earth.Jakob Huber - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (2):231-249.
    The paper contrasts Kant's conception of original common possession of the earth with Hugo Grotius's superficially similar notion. The aim is not only to elucidate how much Kant departs from his natural law predecessors—given that Grotius's needs-based framework very much lines in with contemporary theorists’ tendency to reduce issues of global concern to questions of how to divide the world up, it also seeks to advocate Kant's global thinking as an alternative for current debates. Crucially, it is Kant's radical shift (...)
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  13.  1
    Reading Rousseau's Second Discourse in the Light of the Question: What is the Source of Social Inequality?James David - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (2).
    Rousseau has been cast as someone who is primarily interested in developing a normative social and political philosophy based on the idea of a non-inflamed form of amour-propre, which consists in a desire for equal, as opposed to superior, social standing. On this basis it has been argued that inflamed amour-propre is the principal source of social inequality in his Second Discourse and that the normative aspects of this text can be largely isolated from its descriptive ones. I argue against (...)
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  14.  3
    The Compatibility of Freedom and Necessity in Marx's Idea of Communist Society.David James - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (2):270-293.
    Taking a well-known passage from the third volume of Capital as my starting point, I explain on what grounds Marx thinks that freedom and necessity will be compatible in a communist society. The necessity in question concerns having to produce to satisfy material needs. Unlike some accounts of this issue, I argue that the compatibility of freedom and necessity in communist society has more to do with how production is organized than with the direct relation of the worker to the (...)
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  15. Believing In Twin Earth: New Evidence for the Normativity of Belief.Seyed Ali Kalantari & Alexander Miller - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (2).
    According to many philosophers, the notion of belief is constitutively normative ; Shah ; Shah and Velleman (); Gibbard (); Wedgwood ). In a series of widely discussed papers, Terence Horgan and Mark Timmons have developed an ingenious ‘Moral Twin Earth’ argument against ‘Cornell Realist’ metaethical views which hold that moral terms have synthetic natural definitions in the manner of natural kind terms. In this paper we shall suggest that an adaptation of the Moral Twin Earth argument to the doxastic (...)
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  16.  57
    Nietzsche and Murdoch on the Moral Significance of Perceptual Experience.Paul Katsafanas - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (2).
    : This paper examines a claim defended by an unlikely pair: Friedrich Nietzsche and Iris Murdoch. The claim is that perceptual experience itself—as distinct from perceptually based judgments and beliefs—can be morally significant. In particular, Nietzsche and Murdoch hold that two agents in the same circumstances attending to the same objects can have experiences with different contents, depending on the concepts that they possess and employ. Moreover, they maintain that this renders perception an object of moral concern. This paper explicates (...)
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  17.  5
    Kant and the Normativity of Logic.Huaping Lu‐Adler - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (2):207-230.
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  18.  6
    Kant on Impenetrability, Touch, and the Causal Content of Perception.Colin Marshall - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (2).
    It is well known that Kant claims that causal judgments, including judgments about forces, must have an a priori basis. It is less well known that Kant claims that we can perceive the repulsive force of bodies through the sense of touch. Together, these claims present an interpretive puzzle, since they appear to commit Kant to both affirming and denying that we can have perceptions of force. My first aim is to show that both sides of the puzzle have deep (...)
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  19. Kant's Transcendental Deduction: An Analytical‐Historical Commentary, by Henry Allison. Oxford University Press, 2015, 496 Pp. ISBN 13: 978‐0‐19‐872485‐8 Hb £75.00. [REVIEW]Colin McLear - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (2):546-554.
  20.  4
    Beholdenness to Entities and the Concept of ‘Dasein’: Phenomenology, Ontology and Idealism in the Early Heidegger.Denis McManus - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (2):512-534.
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  21.  5
    In Defense of a Democratic Productivist Welfare State.Michael Moehler - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (2):416-439.
    In this article, I defend a democratic form of the productivist welfare state. I argue that this form of the state can best cope, theoretically and practically, with the diversity of deeply morally pluralistic democratic societies for two reasons. First, the justification of this form of the state rests solely on general facts about human nature, basic human needs, and efficiency considerations in a world of moderately scarce resources. Second, this state does not aim to promote a specific view of (...)
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  22. Action as the Conclusion of Practical Reasoning; The Critique of a Rödlian Account.Mylonaki Evgenia - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (2).
    In this paper I take up the question of whether and in what sense action might be the conclusion of practical reasoning and argue against the answer provided by Sebastian Rödl's account of practical reasoning. Rödl's account aspires to steer a middle ground between the attitudinal and the neo-Aristotelian accounts of practical reasoning, by proposing that its conclusion is at once a thought and a movement. This account is worth considering for it promises to explain both practical reasoning's practicality and (...)
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  23.  2
    Autonomy and Mental Disorder, Edited by Lubomira Radoilska. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012, Xli + 285 Pp. ISBN 978‐0‐19‐959542‐6 Pb £41.99. [REVIEW]Tom O'Shea - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (2):564-569.
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  24. Cornell Realism, Explanation, and Natural Properties.Luis R. G. Oliveira & Timothy Perrine - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (2).
    The claim that ordinary ethical discourse is typically true and that ethical facts are typically knowable seems in tension with the claim that ordinary ethical discourse is about features of reality friendly to a scientific worldview. Cornell Realism attempts to dispel this tension by claiming that ordinary ethical discourse is, in fact, discourse about the same kinds of things that scientific discourse is about: natural properties. We offer two novel arguments in reply. First, we identify a key assumption that we (...)
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  25.  3
    What Do We See When We See Total Darkness?Emmanuel Ordóñez Angulo - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (2).
    Seeing total darkness is a peculiar perceptual state: in it, the subject is visually aware of something while seeming to fail to be aware of anything. Recent treatments of the topic leave this particular puzzle unsolved. Here, I attempt a solution. Following Dretske, I begin by suggesting that the perceptual report ‘S sees darkness’ is ambiguous between two distinct kinds of perceptual states: epistemic and non-epistemic. This will lead to an examination of the metaphysics of what is supposed to be (...)
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  26.  1
    Kritik von Lebensformen, by Rahel Jaeggi. Frankfurt A.M.: Suhrkamp Verlag, 2014, 451 Pp. ISBN 978‐3‐518‐29587‐8 €20.00. [REVIEW]Terry Pinkard - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (2):540-546.
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  27. Schopenhauer on the Rights of Animals.Stephen Puryear - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (2):250-269.
    I argue that Schopenhauer’s ascription of (moral) rights to animals flows naturally from his distinctive analysis of the concept of a right. In contrast to those who regard rights as fundamental and then cast wrongdoing as a matter of violating rights, he takes wrong (Unrecht) to be the more fundamental notion and defines the concept of a right (Recht) in its terms. He then offers an account of wrongdoing which makes it plausible to suppose that at least many animals can (...)
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  28.  2
    Defending Nietzsche's Constructivism About Objects.Justin Remhof - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (2).
    Nietzsche appears to adopt a radical Kantian view of objects called constructivism, which holds that the existence of all objects depends essentially on our practices. This essay provides a new reconstruction of Nietzsche's argument for constructivism and responds to five pressing objections to reading Nietzsche as a constructivist that have not been addressed by commentators defending constructivist interpretations of Nietzsche.
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  29. Hegel on Beauty, by Julia Peters. New York, NY: Routledge, 2015, 161 Pp. ISBN 978‐1‐138‐79595‐2 Hb $145.00. [REVIEW]Fred Rush - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (2):535-540.
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  30.  14
    The Moral Insignificance of Self‐Consciousness.Joshua Shepherd - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (2):398-415.
    In this paper, I examine the claim that self-consciousness is highly morally significant, such that the fact that an entity is self-conscious generates strong moral reasons against harming or killing that entity. This claim is apparently very intuitive, but I argue it is false. I consider two ways to defend this claim: one indirect, the other direct. The best-known arguments relevant to self-consciousness's significance take the indirect route. I examine them and argue that in various ways they depend on unwarranted (...)
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  31.  13
    Forms Not Norms! On Haugeland on Heidegger on Being.R. Matthew Shockey - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (2):485-511.
  32.  4
    Conceptual Role Semantics and the Reference of Moral Concepts.Neil Sinclair - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (2).
    This paper examines the prospects for a conceptual or functional role theory of moral concepts. It is argued that such an account is well-placed to explain both the irreducibility and practicality of moral concepts. Several versions of conceptual role semantics for moral concepts are distinguished, depending on whether the concept-constitutive conceptual roles are wide or narrow normative or non-normative and purely doxastic or conative. It is argued that the most plausible version of conceptual role semantics for moral concepts involves only (...)
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  33. Aims and Exclusivity.Ema Sullivan‐Bissett - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (2).
    If belief has an aim by being a intentional activity, then it ought to be the case that the aim of belief can be weighed against other aims one might have. However, this is not so with the putative truth aim of belief: from the first-person perspective, one can only be motivated by truth considerations in deliberation over what to believe. From this perspective then, the aim cannot be weighed. This problem is captured by David Owens's Exclusivity Objection to belief (...)
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  34.  2
    Perceptual Experience and Cognitive Penetrability.Somogy Varga - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (2):376-397.
    This paper starts by distinguishing three views about the phenomenal character of perceptual experience. ‘Low-level theorists’ argue that perceptual experience is reducible to the experience of low-level properties, ‘high-level theorists’ argue that we have perceptual experiences of high-level properties, while ‘disunified view theorists’ argue that perceptual seemings can present high-level properties. The paper explores how cognitive states can penetrate perceptual experience and provides an interpretation of cognitive penetration that offers some support for the high-level view.
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  35.  4
    Rule‐Following and Rule‐Breaking: Kierkegaard and Wittgenstein.Watts Daniel - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (2).
    My aim in this paper is twofold: to establish that Kierkegaard's so-called theory of the leap strongly anticipates a line of argument that is central to Wittgenstein's so-called rule-following considerations; and to begin to show how Kierkegaard's work has fruitful contributions of its own to make to on-going discussions about rules and rule-following. The paper focuses throughout on the question of how, if at all, human rule-following can be distinguished from behaviour that is merely mechanical or instinctual. I identify a (...)
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  36.  3
    Adorno's Aristotle Critique and Ethical Naturalism.Tom Whyman - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (2).
    In this paper, I do three things. First, I unpack and outline an intriguing but neglected aspect of the thought of the Frankfurt School critical theorist Theodor W. Adorno—namely, his critique of Aristotle, which can be found in two of his lecture series: the unpublished 1956 lectures on moral philosophy and the 1965 lectures published as Metaphysics: Concept and Problems. Second, I demonstrate how Adorno's Aristotle critique constitutes a powerful critique of contemporary neo-Aristotelian ethical naturalism, of the sort advocated by (...)
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  37.  4
    Concealing and Concealment in Heidegger.Katherine Withy - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (2).
    The self-concealing of being is a primary preoccupation of Heidegger's later thought, but neither Heidegger nor his interpreters have made clear precisely what it is. In this paper, I identify the self-concealing of being as the concealing of the worlding of the world, which is essential to and simultaneous with that worlding. In order to establish this, I sketch a taxonomy of the various phenomena of concealing and concealment in Heidegger's work by building on Mark Wrathall's four ‘planks’ of unconcealing (...)
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  38.  6
    Haugeland's Heidegger and the Metaphysics of Normativity.Katherine Withy - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (2):463-484.
    : John Haugeland's distinctive approach to Heidegger's ontology rests on taking scientific explanation to be a paradigmatic case of understanding the being of entities. I argue that this paradigm, and the more general account that Haugeland develops from it, misses a crucial component of Heidegger's picture: the dynamic character of being. While this dimension of being first comes to the fore after Being and Time, it should have been present all along. Its absence grounds Heidegger's persistent confusion about whether world (...)
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  39.  5
    Object‐Dependent Thought Without Illusion.Solveig Aasen - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (1):68-84.
    When unknowingly experiencing a perceptual hallucination, a subject can attempt to think specifically about what is, as far as he or she can tell, the perceived object. Is the subject then deceived about his or her cognitive situation? I answer negatively. Moreover, I argue that this answer is compatible with holding that thought specifically about a certain object – singular thought – is object-dependent. By contrast, both critics and advocates of the view that singular thought is object-dependent have assumed this (...)
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  40.  8
    From Empiricism to Expressivism, by Robert Brandom. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2015, 289pp. ISBN 978‐0‐67‐418728‐3 Hb £25.95. [REVIEW]Simon Blackburn - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (1):195-199.
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  41.  1
    Propositional Content, by Peter Hanks. Oxford University Press, 2015, X + 227 Pp. ISBN 978‐0‐19‐968489‐2 Hb £30.00. [REVIEW]Daniel Brigham - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (1):184-189.
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  42. Weltschmerz: Pessimism in German Philosophy, 1860–1900, by Frederick C. Beiser. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016, Ix+301 Pp. ISBN 10/13:978-0-19-876871-5 Hb £40.00. [REVIEW]Joshua Foa Dienstag - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (1):199-203.
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  43.  8
    What It's Like To Have a Cognitive Home.Matt Duncan - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (1).
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  44. Nietzsche on Mind and Nature, Edited by Manuel Dries and P. J. E. Kail. Oxford University Press, 2015, 256 Pp. ISBN 13: 978‐0‐19‐872223‐6 Hb £40.00. [REVIEW]Forster Jeremy - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (1):189-195.
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  45.  3
    Evidence and Religious Belief, Edited by Kelly James Clark and Raymond J. VanArragon. Oxford: Oxford University Press, Ix + 214 Pp. ISBN 13: 978‐0‐19‐960371‐8 Hb £36; Also Available as eBook. [REVIEW]Amber L. Griffioen - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (1):178-184.
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  46.  1
    A Comedy We Believe In: A Further Look at Sartre's Theory of Emotions.Martin Hartmann - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (1):144-172.
    This paper discusses recent interpretations of Jean-Paul Sartre's early theory of emotions, in particular his Sketch for a Theory of the Emotions. Despite the great interest that Sartre's approach has generated, most interpretations assume that his approach fails because it appears to be focussed on ‘malformed’, ‘irrational’ or ‘distorted’ emotions. I argue that these criticisms adopt a rationalistic or epistemically biassed perspective on emotions that is wrongly applied to Sartre's text. In my defence of Sartre I show that the directional (...)
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  47.  4
    Enkratic Agency.David Horst - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (1):47-67.
    An enkratic agent is someone who intends to do A because she believes she should do A. Being enkratic is usually understood as something rationality requires of you. However, we must distinguish between different conceptions of enkratic rationality. According to a fairly common view, enkratic rationality is solely a normative requirement on agency: it tells us how agents should think and act. However, I shall argue that this normativist conception of enkratic rationality faces serious difficulties: it makes it a mystery (...)
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  48.  4
    A Capacity to Get Things Right: Gilbert Ryle on Knowledge.Michael Kremer - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (1):25-46.
    Gilbert Ryle's distinction between knowledge-how and knowledge-that faces a significant challenge: accounting for the unity of knowledge. Jason Stanley, an ‘intellectualist’ opponent of Ryle's, brings out this problem by arguing that Ryleans must treat ‘know’ as an ambiguous word and must distinguish knowledge proper from knowledge-how, which is ‘knowledge’ only so-called. I develop the challenge and show that underlying Ryle's distinction is a unified vision of knowledge as ‘a capacity to get things right’, covering both knowledge-how and knowledge-that. I show (...)
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  49.  4
    Kierkegaard on Impartiality and Love.Sharon Krishek - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (1):109-128.
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  50.  6
    Recent Scholarship on Hume's Theory of Mental Representation.David Landy - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (1).
    In a recent paper, Karl Schafer argues that Hume's theory of mental representation has two distinct components, unified by their shared feature of having accuracy conditions. As Schafer sees it, simple and complex ideas represent the intrinsic imagistic features of their objects whereas abstract ideas represent the relations or structures in which multiple objects stand. This distinction, however, is untenable for at least two related reasons. Firstly, complex ideas represent the relations or structures in which the impressions that are the (...)
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  51.  6
    Action, Knowledge, and Will, by John Hyman. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2015, Xi + 255 Pp. ISBN 13:978‐0‐19‐873577‐9 Hb £35.00. [REVIEW]Errol Lord - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (1):173-178.
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  52. Nietzsche, Nature, Nurture.Aaron Ridley - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (1):129-143.
    Nietzsche claims that we are fated to be as we are. He also claims, however, that we can create ourselves. To many commentators these twin commitments have seemed self-contradictory or paradoxical. The argument of this paper, by contrast, is that, despite appearances, there is no paradox here, nor even a tension between Nietzsche's two claims. Instead, when properly interpreted these claims turn out to be intimately related to one another, so that our fatedness emerges as integral to our capacity to (...)
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  53.  6
    Kant's Criticism of Common Moral Rational Cognition.Martin Sticker - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (1):85-108.
    There is a consensus that Kant's aim in the Groundwork is to clarify, systematize and vindicate the common conception of morality. Philosophical theory hence serves a restorative function. It can strengthen agents' motivation, protect against self-deception and correct misunderstandings produced by uncritical moral theory. In this paper, I argue that Kant also corrects the common perspective and that Kant's Groundwork shows in which senses the common perspective, even considered apart from its propensity to self-deception and without being influenced by misleading (...)
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  54.  2
    Science, Realism and Correlationism. A Phenomenological Critique of Meillassoux' Argument From Ancestrality.Harald A. Wiltsche - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (1).
    Quentin Meillassoux has recently launched a sweeping attack against ‘correlationism’. Correlationism is an umbrella term for any philosophical system that is based on ‘the idea [that] we only ever have access to the correlation between thinking and being, and never to either term considered apart from the other’. Thus construed, Meillassoux' critique is indeed a sweeping one: It comprises major parts of the philosophical tradition since Kant, both in its more continental and in its more analytical outlooks. In light of (...)
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  55. Cryptonormative Judgments.Alex Worsnip - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (1):3-24.
    A cryptonormative judgment, roughly speaking, is a judgment that is presented by the agent who makes it as non-normative, but that is in fact normative. The idea of cryptonormativity is familiar from debates in social theory, social psychology, and continental political philosophy, but has to my knowledge never been treated in analytic metaethics, moral psychology or epistemology except in passing. In this paper, I argue, first, that cryptonormative judgments are pervasive: familiar cases from everyday life are most naturally diagnosed as (...)
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  56.  6
    Aims and Exclusivity.Ema Sullivan-Bissett - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25.
    If belief has an aim by being a intentional activity, then it ought to be the case that the aim of belief can be weighed against other aims one might have. However, this is not so with the putative truth aim of belief: from the first-person perspective, one can only be motivated by truth considerations in deliberation over what to believe. From this perspective then, the aim cannot be weighed. This problem is captured by David Owens's Exclusivity Objection to belief (...)
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  57. Kant on Impenetrability, Touch, and the Causal Content of Perception.Colin Marshall - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy (4).
    It is well known that Kant claims that causal judgments, including judgments about forces, must have an a priori basis. It is less well known that Kant claims that we can perceive the repulsive force of bodies through the sense of touch. Together, these claims present an interpretive puzzle, since they appear to commit Kant to both affirming and denying that we can have perceptions of force. My first aim is to show that both sides of the puzzle have deep (...)
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  58.  5
    What Do We See When We See Total Darkness?Emmanuel Ordóñez Angulo - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy (4).
    Seeing total darkness is a peculiar perceptual state: in it, the subject is visually aware of something while seeming to fail to be aware of anything. Recent treatments of the topic leave this particular puzzle unsolved. Here, I attempt a solution. Following Dretske, I begin by suggesting that the perceptual report ‘S sees darkness’ is ambiguous between two distinct kinds of perceptual states: epistemic and non-epistemic. This will lead to an examination of the metaphysics of what is supposed to be (...)
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  59.  16
    Rule‐Following and Rule‐Breaking: Kierkegaard and Wittgenstein.Watts Daniel - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy (4).
    My aim in this paper is twofold: to establish that Kierkegaard's so-called theory of the leap strongly anticipates a line of argument that is central to Wittgenstein's so-called rule-following considerations; and to begin to show how Kierkegaard's work has fruitful contributions of its own to make to on-going discussions about rules and rule-following. The paper focuses throughout on the question of how, if at all, human rule-following can be distinguished from behaviour that is merely mechanical or instinctual. I identify a (...)
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  60.  5
    What is It to Depsychologize Psychology?Stina Bäckström - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy (2):358-375.
    In this essay, I distinguish two ways of depsychologizing psychology: ‘anti-psychologism’ and ‘non-psychologism’. Both positions are responses to the Fregean sharp distinction between the logical and the psychological. But where anti-psychologism, which I find in John McDowell, attempts to overcome the sharp distinction by arguing that psychological states and their expressions are apt to be articulated into judgments, Stanley Cavell's non-psychologism, a powerful and neglected alternative, wants to overcome the sharp distinction by abandoning judgment as the paradigm expression of thought (...)
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  61.  8
    Wittgenstein, Theories of Meaning, and Linguistic Disjunctivism.Silver Bronzo - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy (2).
    This paper argues that Wittgenstein opposed theories of meaning, and did so for good reasons. Theories of meaning, in the sense discussed here, are attempts to explain what makes it the case that certain sounds, shapes, or movements are meaningful linguistic expressions. It is widely believed that Wittgenstein made fundamental contributions to this explanatory project. I argue, by contrast, that in both his early and later works, Wittgenstein endorsed a disjunctivist conception of language which rejects the assumption underlying the question (...)
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  62.  11
    The Double Intentionality of Emotional Experience.Tom Cochrane - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy (2).
    I argue that while the feeling of bodily responses is not necessary to emotion, these feelings contribute significant meaningful content to everyday emotional experience. Emotional bodily feelings represent a ‘state of self’, analysed as a sense of one's body affording certain patterns of interaction with the environment. Recognising that there are two sources of intentional content in everyday emotional experience allows us to reconcile the diverging intuitions that people have about emotional states, and to understand better the long-standing debate between (...)
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  63.  4
    Heidegger, Art, and the Overcoming of Metaphysics.Matt Dill - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy (2):294-311.
    In this paper, I advance a new interpretation of Heidegger's reflections on art as we find them in his essay, ‘The Origin of the Work of Art’. I begin, in Section 1, by uncovering the fundamental concern that motivates Heidegger's essay. I show that Heidegger's reflections on art are part of his attempt to uncover a path beyond the history of metaphysics. I then suggest, in Section 2, that while Heidegger does think that art may allow for the overcoming of (...)
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  64.  12
    Action as the Conclusion of Practical Reasoning; The Critique of a Rödlian Account.Evgenia Mylonaki - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy (2).
    In this paper I take up the question of whether and in what sense action might be the conclusion of practical reasoning and argue against the answer provided by Sebastian Rödl's account of practical reasoning. Rödl's account aspires to steer a middle ground between the attitudinal and the neo-Aristotelian accounts of practical reasoning, by proposing that its conclusion is at once a thought and a movement. This account is worth considering for it promises to explain both practical reasoning's practicality and (...)
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  65.  10
    Realizing the Good: Hegel's Critique of Kantian Morality.Nicolás García Mills - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy (2).
    Although the best-known Hegelian objection against Kant's moral philosophy is the charge that the categorical imperative is an ‘empty formalism’, Hegel's criticisms also include what we might call the realizability objection. Tentatively stated, the realizability objection says that within the sphere of Kantian morality, the good remains an unrealizable ‘ought’ – in other words, the Kantian moral ‘ought’ can never become an ‘is’. In this paper, I attempt to come to grips with this objection in two steps. In the first (...)
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  66.  2
    Reading Rousseau's Second Discourse in the Light of the Question: What is the Source of Social Inequality?James David - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy (2).
    Rousseau has been cast as someone who is primarily interested in developing a normative social and political philosophy based on the idea of a non-inflamed form of amour-propre, which consists in a desire for equal, as opposed to superior, social standing. On this basis it has been argued that inflamed amour-propre is the principal source of social inequality in his Second Discourse and that the normative aspects of this text can be largely isolated from its descriptive ones. I argue against (...)
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  67.  3
    The Compatibility of Freedom and Necessity in Marx's Idea of Communist Society.David James - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy (2):270-293.
    Taking a well-known passage from the third volume of Capital as my starting point, I explain on what grounds Marx thinks that freedom and necessity will be compatible in a communist society. The necessity in question concerns having to produce to satisfy material needs. Unlike some accounts of this issue, I argue that the compatibility of freedom and necessity in communist society has more to do with how production is organized than with the direct relation of the worker to the (...)
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  68.  15
    Believing In Twin Earth: New Evidence for the Normativity of Belief.Seyed Ali Kalantari & Alexander Miller - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy (2).
    According to many philosophers, the notion of belief is constitutively normative ; Shah ; Shah and Velleman (); Gibbard (); Wedgwood ). In a series of widely discussed papers, Terence Horgan and Mark Timmons have developed an ingenious ‘Moral Twin Earth’ argument against ‘Cornell Realist’ metaethical views which hold that moral terms have synthetic natural definitions in the manner of natural kind terms. In this paper we shall suggest that an adaptation of the Moral Twin Earth argument to the doxastic (...)
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  69.  69
    Conceptual Role Semantics and the Reference of Moral Concepts.Neil Sinclair - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy (2).
    This paper examines the prospects for a conceptual or functional role theory of moral concepts. It is argued that such an account is well-placed to explain both the irreducibility and practicality of moral concepts. Several versions of conceptual role semantics for moral concepts are distinguished, depending on whether the concept-constitutive conceptual roles are wide or narrow normative or non-normative and purely doxastic or conative. It is argued that the most plausible version of conceptual role semantics for moral concepts involves only (...)
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  70.  14
    Perceptual Experience and Cognitive Penetrability.Somogy Varga - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy (2):376-397.
    This paper starts by distinguishing three views about the phenomenal character of perceptual experience. ‘Low-level theorists’ argue that perceptual experience is reducible to the experience of low-level properties, ‘high-level theorists’ argue that we have perceptual experiences of high-level properties, while ‘disunified view theorists’ argue that perceptual seemings can present high-level properties. The paper explores how cognitive states can penetrate perceptual experience and provides an interpretation of cognitive penetration that offers some support for the high-level view.
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  71.  3
    Adorno's Aristotle Critique and Ethical Naturalism.Tom Whyman - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy (2).
    In this paper, I do three things. First, I unpack and outline an intriguing but neglected aspect of the thought of the Frankfurt School critical theorist Theodor W. Adorno—namely, his critique of Aristotle, which can be found in two of his lecture series: the unpublished 1956 lectures on moral philosophy and the 1965 lectures published as Metaphysics: Concept and Problems. Second, I demonstrate how Adorno's Aristotle critique constitutes a powerful critique of contemporary neo-Aristotelian ethical naturalism, of the sort advocated by (...)
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  72.  18
    From Empiricism to Expressivism, by Robert Brandom. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2015, 289pp. ISBN 978‐0‐67‐418728‐3 Hb £25.95. [REVIEW]Simon Blackburn - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy (1):195-199.
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  73.  2
    Weltschmerz: Pessimism in German Philosophy, 1860–1900, by Frederick C. Beiser. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016, Ix+301 Pp. ISBN 10/13:978-0-19-876871-5 Hb £40.00. [REVIEW]Joshua Foa Dienstag - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy (1):199-203.
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  74. Nietzsche on Mind and Nature, Edited by Manuel Dries and P. J. E. Kail. Oxford University Press, 2015, 256 Pp. ISBN 13: 978‐0‐19‐872223‐6 Hb £40.00. [REVIEW]Forster Jeremy - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy (1):189-195.
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  75.  9
    Evidence and Religious Belief, Edited by Kelly James Clark and Raymond J. VanArragon. Oxford: Oxford University Press, Ix + 214 Pp. ISBN 13: 978‐0‐19‐960371‐8 Hb £36; Also Available as eBook. [REVIEW]Amber L. Griffioen - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy (1):178-184.
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  76.  7
    Action and Variation in Perception.Kristjan Laasik - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy (published online).
    In her paper, ‘Action and Self-location in Perception’, Susanna Schellenberg argues that perceptual experience of an object's intrinsic spatial properties, such as its size and shape, requires a capacity to act. More specifically, Schellenberg argues that, to have a perceptual experience of an object's intrinsic spatial properties, a subject needs to have a certain practical conception of space, or a spatial know-how. That, in turn, requires self-locating representations, which locate the subject, relative to the perceptual object, as a perceiver and (...)
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