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  1.  19
    Ontological Commitment in Gregory of Rimini.Richard Cross - 2023 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 97 (4):463-479.
    This paper discusses two interrelated questions about ontological commitment in the thought of Gregory of Rimini (d. 1358), questions having to do with both hylomorphic composites of matter and substantial form, and with complexe significabilia that typically obtain in cases of substance–accident composition. The first question is that of the existence of real relations: neither hylomorphic composites nor complexe significabilia require real relations tying their various co-located components together. The second is that of the reducibility of such wholes to the (...)
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  2.  12
    Introduction.Russell L. Friedman & Zita V. Toth - 2023 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 97 (4):431-439.
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  3. Durand of St.-Pourçain’s Moderate Reductionism about Hylomorphic Composites.Peter John Hartman - 2023 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 97 (4):441-462.
    According to a standard interpretation of Aristotle, a material substance, like a dog, is a hylomorphic composite of matter and form, its “essential” parts. Is such a composite some thing in addition to its essential parts as united? The moderate reductionist says “no,” whereas the anti-reductionist says “yes.” In this paper, I will clarify and defend Durand of St.-Pourçain’s surprisingly influential version of moderate reductionism, according to which hylomorphic composites are nothing over and above their essential parts and the union (...)
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  4.  20
    Individuation and New Matter Theories in Late Sixteenth- and Early Seventeenth-Century Protestant Scholasticism.Helen N. Hattab - 2023 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 97 (4):603-628.
    It is often thought that Aristotelian hylomorphism was undermined in the early modern era by the external challenges that alternative atomist and corpuscularian matter theories posed. This narrative neglects the fact that hylomorphism was not one homogeneous theory but a fruitful, adaptable framework that enabled scholastic Aristotelianism to continuously transform itself from within and resolve new natural philosophical, metaphysical, and theological problems. I focus on the period of the Counter-Reformation and rise of Protestant scholastic metaphysics. During this time accounting for (...)
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  5.  11
    Paul of Venice and the Plurality of Forms and Souls.Thomas Jeschke - 2023 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 97 (4):555-575.
    In this paper, I focus on Paul of Venice’s plurality of forms and souls, i.e., his “two total souls” theory. I argue that this specific theory is a result of Paul’s reception of various positions originating from fourteenth-century Parisian philosophers like John of Jandun, the Anonymous Patar, Nicole Oresme, John Duns Scotus, and Walter Burley. By receiving these positions and by making use of merely parts of their doctrines, Paul creates a theory of the hylomorphic compound that fits well within (...)
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  6.  18
    Can Something New Be Produced by Moving Things Around?Kamil Majcherek - 2023 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 97 (4):481-503.
    In the late Middle Ages, there was an intense debate about the metaphysical status of artefacts, in particular about whether an artefact is a new thing over and above the natural things that make it up. Realists about artefacts argued for a positive reply. In this paper, I will examine the following objection against artefact realism raised by artefact nominalists: The making of artefacts involves nothing more than local motion of already existing natural things or their parts, and local motion (...)
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  7.  18
    Can Accidents Alone Generate Substantial Forms? Twists and Turns of a Late Medieval Debate.Sylvain Roudaut - 2023 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 97 (4):529-554.
    This paper investigates the late medieval controversy over the causal role of substantial forms in the generation of new substances. At the beginning of the fourteenth century, when there were two basic positions in this debate (section II), an original position was defended by Walter Burley and Peter Auriol, according to which accidents alone—by their own power—can generate substantial forms (section III). The paper presents how this view was received by the next generation of philosophers, i.e., around 1350 (section IV), (...)
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  8.  19
    Faculties of the Soul and Descartes’s Rejection of Substantial Forms.Adam Wood - 2023 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 97 (4):577-601.
    In a 1642 letter to Regius, Descartes elaborates several reasons for rejecting Aristotelian substantial forms including that (1) they are explanatorily impotent, (2) they are explanatorily unnecessary, and (3) they threaten the incorporeality and immortality of the human soul. Various ideas have already been proposed as to why Descartes thought Aristotelian substantial forms are susceptible to these criticisms. Here I suggest one further such idea, centered on the ways Descartes and medieval scholastics thought substantial forms—and souls in particular—are related to (...)
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  9.  20
    Innovative Conceptions of Substantial Change in Early Fourteenth-Century Discussions of Minima Naturalia.Roberto Zambiasi - 2023 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 97 (4):505-528.
    This article contains a case study of some innovative early fourteenth-century conceptions of the temporal structure of substantial change. An important tenet of thirteenth-century scholastic hylomorphism is that substantial change is an instantaneous process. In contrast, three early fourteenth-century Aristotelian commentators, first Walter Burley and then John Buridan and Albert of Saxony, progressively develop a view on which substantial change is linked to temporal duration. This process culminated, in Buridan and Albert of Saxony, with the explicit recognition of the temporally (...)
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  10.  16
    What Happened to Civility: The Promise and Failure of Montaigne's Modern Project.John J. Conley - 2023 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 97 (3):426-427.
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  11.  27
    The Two Greatest Ideas: How Our Grasp of the Universe and of Our Minds Changed Everything.John F. Crosby - 2023 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 97 (3):428-430.
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  12.  10
    The Way of Medicine: Ethics and the Healing Profession.Heidi M. Giebel - 2023 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 97 (3):418-421.
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  13.  25
    Mitigating the Magic.John Jalsevac - 2023 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 97 (3):267-292.
    Aquinas famously argues that there exists a purely active intellective power—i.e., the agent intellect—in each human agent that is capable of “abstracting” universals, including natures, from sensible phantasms. Robert Pasnau has worried, however, that Aquinas’s thin account of how the agent intellect performs abstraction makes abstraction appear to be little short of “magic.” In this paper I reply to Pasnau’s objection by arguing for the necessity of expanding the standard account of Aquinas’s theory to include the oft-neglected role of the (...)
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  14.  15
    Philip of the Blessed Trinity on Mystical Knowledge.Kateřina Kutarňová - 2023 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 97 (3):339-359.
    This study concerns the theory of mystical knowledge advanced by the practically unknown seventeenth-century Carmelite author Philip of the Blessed Trinity in his work Summa Theologiae Mysticae. Philip introduces “a new kind” of spiritual species representing the intellectibilia to describe how individuals are granted mystical knowledge, and in doing so distinguishes between three kinds of species. Philip’s notion of mystical knowledge is closely related to the topic of contemplation and is profoundly influenced by The Interior Castle of St. Teresa of (...)
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  15.  30
    Virtue and the Paradox of Tragedy.Christopher W. Love - 2023 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 97 (3):293-310.
    What accounts for our pleasure in tragic art? In a widely-cited essay, Susan Feagin argues that this pleasure has moral roots; it arises when we discover ourselves to be the sort of people who respond sympathetically to another’s suffering. Although critical of Feagin’s particular solution to the tragedy paradox, I too believe that our pleasure in tragedy often has moral roots. I trace those roots differently, however, by placing the concept of virtue front and center. I argue that a noble (...)
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  16.  12
    Conscience: Four Thomistic Treatments. Osborne Jr - 2023 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 97 (3):415-417.
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  17.  23
    Suárez’s Republic of Demons.Daniel Schwartz - 2023 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 97 (3):387-414.
    Suárez was probably the first theologian to propose a political understanding of the order of subordination among the demons. According to Aquinas, this subordination immediately reflects the natural differences in perfection between the demons. Suárez charged that a natural-based order of demonic subordination could not ground the capacity of the demons’ ruler—Lucifer—to use his power to impose civic obligations on fellow demons so as to pursue their joint evil goals. But can there be obligations ad malum? This paper explores a (...)
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  18.  12
    By Way of Obstacles: A Pathway Through a Work.Anthony J. Scordino - 2023 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 97 (3):422-425.
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  19.  28
    Value Incommensurability in Natural Law Ethics: A Clarification and Critique.Matthew Shea - 2023 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 97 (3):361-386.
    The foundation of natural law ethics is a set of basic human goods, such as life and health, knowledge, work and play, appreciation of beauty, friendship, and religion. A disputed question among natural law theorists is whether the basic goods are “incommensurable.” But there is widespread ambiguity in the natural law literature about what incommensurability means, which makes it unclear how this disagreement should be understood and resolved. First, I clear up this ambiguity by distinguishing between incommensurability and incomparability. I (...)
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  20.  18
    Unde huic fictioni non est respondendum.Michael Szlachta - 2023 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 97 (3):311-337.
    William de la Mare suggests in his Correctorium fratris Thomae that it is possible to read Aquinas as saying that the will is necessitated by the intellect. Early defenders of Aquinas thought that this was nonsense (a fictio). However, I analyze Aquinas’s corpus and show that he has a consistent view of the relationship between the will and the intellect according to which the will is indeed necessitated by the intellect, not absolutely but conditionally: it is necessary that, if the (...)
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  21.  14
    John Buridan.Chiara Beneduce - 2023 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 97 (2):161-182.
    This article considers the relationship between John Buridan’s natural philosophy and medicine. By examining some aspects of Buridan’s description of the human body related to sensation, nutrition, and generation—especially as they were framed in the so-called “controversy between philosophers and physicians”—this article shows that, though mostly faithful to Aristotelian doctrine, Buridan’s theoretical biology relies to a large extent on medical ideas.
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  22.  16
    John Buridan on the Question of the Unity of the Human Being.Joël Biard - 2023 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 97 (2):183-209.
    Is a human being something that is one per se, or are humans composed of two independent substances? Treating the soul as the form of an organic body seems to offer one way of addressing the difficulty. But the debates about the nature of the soul which began to emerge in the 1270s made this question problematic. This article considers Buridan’s solution to the problem of how to unify what is corporeal and divisible on the one hand with what is (...)
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  23. Mirecourt, Mental Modes, and Mental Motions.Peter John Hartman - 2023 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 97 (2):227-248.
    What is an occurrent mental state? According to a common scholastic answer such a state is at least in part a quality of the mind. When I newly think about a machiatto, say, my mind acquires a new quality. However, according to a view discussed by John Buridan (who rejects it) and John of Mirecourt (who is condemned in 1347 for considering it “plausible”), an occurrent mental state is not even in part a quality. After sketching some of the history (...)
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  24.  24
    Buridan’s Radical View of Final Causality and Its Influence.Henrik Lagerlund - 2023 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 97 (2):211-226.
    In his commentary on Aristotle’s Physics, John Buridan (c. 1300–1361) presents his well-known rejection of final causality. The main problem he sees with it is that it requires the cause to exist before the effect. Despite this, he retains the terminology of ends. This has led to some difficulty interpreting Buridan’s view. In this article, I argue that one should not misunderstand Buridan’s terminology and think that he still retains some use or explanatory function for final causality in nature. To (...)
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  25.  14
    The Use of Theological Terms in the De anima.Peter G. Sobol - 2023 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 97 (2):249-265.
    Historian of science Edward Grant believed that, by counting and classifying the uses of theological terms in commentaries on some of Aristotle’s natural books, he could show that medieval natural philosophy had no theological agenda. But his broad-brush approach may not reveal differences in the way individual authors used theological terms. A census of such terms in the De anima commentaries of John Buridan and Nicole Oresme undertaken in this paper suggests that Buridan was more mindful of theological scrutiny of (...)
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  26.  16
    Introduction.Jack Zupko - 2023 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 97 (2):153-160.
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  27.  28
    The Place of Pleasure in Neo-Aristotelian Ethics.Travis Butler - 2023 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 97 (1):101-119.
    Richard Kraut argues that Neo-Aristotelian ethics should include a com­mitment to “diluted hedonism,” according to which the exercise of a developed life-capacity is good for S only if and partly because S enjoys it. I argue that the Neo-Aristotelian should reject diluted hedonism for two reasons: first, it compro­mises the generality and elegance of the initial developmentalist account; second, it leads to mistaken evaluations of some of the most important and ennobling capacities and activities in human life. Finally, I argue (...)
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  28.  27
    A Correction to Dillard’s Reading of Geach’s Temporality Argument for Non-Materialism.Stefaan E. Cuypers - 2023 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 97 (1):69-73.
    In his article “What Do We Think With?” Peter Geach develops an argument for the non-materiality of thinking. Given that basic thinking activity is not clockable in physical time, whereas basic material or bodily activity is so clockable, it follows that basic thinking activity is non-material. Peter Dillard’s attack on this temporality proof takes “thoughts” in the proof to refer to non-occurrent states. The present note shows this reading to be mistaken and so rectifies a misunderstanding of Geach’s argument. It (...)
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  29. Platonism and the Objects of Science. By Scott Berman. [REVIEW]Caleb Estep - 2023 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 97 (1):141-143.
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  30. Newman the Fallibilist.Logan Paul Gage & Frederick D. Aquino - 2023 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 97 (1):29-47.
    The role of certitude in our mental lives is, to put it mildly, controversial. Many current epistemologists (including epistemologists of religion) eschew certitude altogether. Given his emphasis on certitude, some have maintained that John Henry Newman was an infallibilist about knowledge. In this paper, we argue that a careful examination of his thought (especially as seen in the Grammar of Assent) reveals that he was an epistemic fallibilist. We first clarify what we mean by fallibilism and infallibilism. Second, we explain (...)
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  31.  26
    Von Hildebrand, Scheler, and Marcel on Interpreting One’s Friends.Joseph Gamache - 2023 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 97 (1):75-99.
    It is generally accepted that truth is a norm of belief and that, whatever else this might mean, it implies that a person is obligated to believe a proposition only if it is true. Yet this seems to conflict with the norms by which friends form beliefs about each other. For instance, if friends are required to practice interpretive charity in the formation of their beliefs about each other, obligations to believe propositions that are false might arise. In this paper, (...)
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  32.  34
    Is There a God? A Debate. By Graham Oppy and Kenneth L. Pearce. [REVIEW]Gaven Kerr - 2023 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 97 (1):144-146.
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  33. Warranted Catholic Belief.Benjamin Robert Koons - 2023 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 97 (1):1-28.
    Extending Alvin Plantinga’s model of warranted belief to the beliefs of groups as a whole, I argue that if the dogmatic beliefs of the Catholic Church are true, they are also warranted. Catholic dogmas are warranted because they meet the three conditions of my model: they are formed (1) by ministers functioning properly (2) in accordance with a design plan that is oriented towards truth and reliable (3) in a social environment sufficiently similar to that for which they were designed. (...)
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  34.  18
    The Precipice: Existential Risk and the Future of Humanity. By Toby Ord. [REVIEW]Daniel John Sportiello - 2023 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 97 (1):147-150.
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  35.  12
    Cell Lines of Illicit Origins and Vaccines.Christopher Tollefsen - 2023 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 97 (1):121-139.
    A March of 2021 “Statement from Pro-Life Catholic Scholars on the Moral Acceptability of Receiving COVID-19 Vaccines,” released by the Ethics and Public Policy Center argued that in accepting one of the Covid vaccines that had recently become available, one would not be “in any way endorsing or con­tributing to the practice of abortion, or... in any way showing disrespect for the remains of an unborn human being.” That statement received criticism from some opponents of abortion. Here, I raise six (...)
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  36. A Transcategorial Conception of Dynamis and Energeia.Hikmet Unlu - 2023 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 97 (1):49-68.
    On the standard interpretation of Metaphysics IX, Aristotle proceeds from the original sense of δύναμις and ἐνέργεια to an ontological conception of these terms. This should raise the question of what is not ontological about the former and what is ontological about the latter. To address these questions I discuss the commentaries by Heidegger and Menn, which alone come close to addressing these issues. But their readings cannot neatly distinguish between the two senses of δύναμις and ἐνέργεια that we find (...)
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