Year:

  1.  1
    The Island Community of Spinalonga Seen in the Light of Dietrich von Hildebrand’s Phenomenology of Community.Michał Bardel - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (4):655-669.
    The paper aims at a phenomenological clarification of the “island community” category in the light of Dietrich von Hildebrand’s metaphysics of community. I begin with presenting a brief social history of the Spinalonga leprosarium as a model of an island community; then follows a sketch of some of the main findings made by the German philosopher concerning community per se, and finally an attempt is made to explain the place of island communities in Hildebrand’s hierarchy of communities. I aim to (...)
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  2.  1
    Reflections on Dietrich von Hildebrand’s My Battle Against Hitler.Buttiglione Rocco - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (4):747-750.
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  3.  1
    Von Hildebrand on Acting Against One’s Better Knowledge.Martin Cajthaml - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (4):637-653.
    In this article, I present and analyze Dietrich von Hildebrand’s explanation of how acting against one’s better knowledge is possible. I do so by comparing it to Plato’s analysis of the same problem. By this comparison, I seek to show the specificity of von Hildebrand’s approach to the phenomenon which, since Aristotle’s time, has been known as “akrasia.”.
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  4.  1
    The Husserlian Sources of Emotive Consciousness in Dietrich von Hildebrand’s Moral Philosophy.Mariano Crespo - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (4):671-686.
    In this paper, I would like to show, in general terms, the Husserlian sources of the way in which von Hildebrand understands emotive consciousness, while still recognizing important differences beween the two authors. To carry out this task I will develop four points of contact between the two thinkers: the idea of the existence of a priori laws in the emotional sphere, the defense of spiritual forms of affectivity, the idea that affective responses to value can be correct or incorrect, (...)
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  5.  2
    Developing Dietrich von Hildebrand’s Personalism.John F. Crosby - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (4):687-702.
    I explore the personalism embedded in von Hildebrand’s moral philosophy, and then I explore the personalism in his later account of love. I claim that his personalism was significantly developed in his later work, and that it can be still further developed by us. I begin by explaining what Hildebrandian value-response is, and then I proceed to show how he subsequently qualified this foundational concept, first in his Ethics but especially in his late work, The Nature of Love, and here (...)
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  6.  1
    Editor's Introduction.John F. Crosby - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (4):507-516.
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  7.  1
    A New Look at A Priori Knowledge and Hildebrand’s Discovery of Different Kinds of Unities.Juan J. García-Norro & Rogelio Rovira - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (4):567-588.
    The main thesis defended in this paper is that Hildebrand’s distinction between what we could call quiddities—or “quasi-essences,” endowed with chaotic and accidental unity—and genuine essences possessing an intrinsically necessary unity, grounds the radical distinction between analytic and synthetic a priori knowledge. This thesis has not been expressly emphasized by Hildebrand himself. In order to prove it, we: relate the three types of unities distinguished by Hildebrand with the three kinds of judgments discriminated by Kant; outline what we can call (...)
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  8.  1
    Evaluation of Dietrich von Hildebrand’s Doctoral Dissertation, “Die Idee der Sittlichen Handlung”.Edmund Husserl - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (4):517-518.
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  9.  1
    Hildebrand’s Platonic Ontology of Value.Andreas A. M. Kinneging - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (4):623-636.
    In this paper Hildebrand’s moral ontology is discussed. It is shown that his moral ontology is, in essence, Platonic rather than Aristotelian. Although Hildebrand’s language differs from that of Plato, the ideas are very similar, given that both are moral absolutists who think that moral eidê are ante rem rather than in re. They agree on the structure of the moral realm and have identical views on participation of the ideal in the real. They also have similar ideas on man’s (...)
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  10.  1
    Love, Freedom, and Morality in Kant and Dietrich von Hildebrand.M. T. Lu - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (4):703-717.
    Modern commentators like Allen Wood have noted that for Kant there “is a basic tension in human nature between loving people and respecting them.” Love is a threat to pure morality insofar as love is an empirical inclination and any will determined by such an inclination is unfree. In this paper, I begin by exploring why Kant thinks that love is a threat to moral freedom. Drawing on the insights of Dietrich von Hildebrand, I propose instead an analysis of love (...)
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  11.  1
    The Religious Significance of von Hildebrand’s Notion of Second Order Beauty.Robert Lee Miller - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (4):589-605.
    In his Aesthetics, Dietrich von Hildebrand analyzes an interesting form of beauty adhering to audible and visible things that he calls second order beauty. In this paper, I will attempt to develop something which von Hildebrand recognizes, but which he himself does not fully develop: the religious significance of second order beauty. In particular, I wish to show that an aesthetic experience of this second order beauty can engender an encounter with God not in the “abstract,” but rather as a (...)
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  12.  2
    Human Action and the Human Heart.Josef Seifert - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (4):737-745.
    Hildebrand oftentimes said that his disciples—even when they believed they were deeply indebted to him for knowledge, wisdom, and truth—had a duty to criticize and overcome any error they would find in his philosophy, because the sole purpose of his writings was to state the truth. He himself gave some extraordinary examples of self-critique. In the following, I wish to treat such an example: a significant error about the nature of the free volitional response, which Stephen Schwarz was the first (...)
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  13.  3
    The Many Powers of the Human Soul.Mark K. Spencer - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (4):719-753.
    Dietrich von Hildebrand is often seen as being at odds with the scholastics in his anthropology. I argue that he in fact uses scholastic principles when distinguishing the powers of the human soul, but he uses these principles to distinguish many more powers in our souls than the scholastics do. His expansion of the list of human powers both is supported by and safeguards his expanded metaphysics of given reality. I first consider the principles that the scholastics use in reasoning (...)
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  14.  1
    Survey of My Philosophy.Dietrich von Hildebrand & John F. Crosby - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (4):519-552.
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  15.  1
    Phenomenological Realism, Pre-Theoretical Awareness of Philosophical Objects, and Theoretical Views About Them.Fritz Wenisch - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (4):607-621.
    First, the chief method and object of philosophy as phenomenological realism understands it will be explained. Second, I turn to Dietrich von Hildebrand’s distinction between a person’s awareness of philosophical objects based on that person’s lived contact with the world and his or her theories about these objects. I emphasize that there is to be an organic transition between these two levels of awareness but that this organic transition is often missing, as in the case of non-philosophers who uncritically adopt (...)
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  16.  2
    An Ontology of Love.John Zizioulas - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (4):553-566.
    Dietrich von Hildebrand’s treatise The Nature of Love is set in relation to the theological personalism of the Cappadocian fathers of the Church, and to my own earlier work done in this tradition. Several points of divergence are explored, especially points concerning von Hildebrand’s claim that love exists as a response to the beauty of the beloved person. God’s love for human beings does not always seem to fit the paradigm of value-response; His love seems to be creative of beauty (...)
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  17.  3
    Scotus and God’s Arbitrary Will.Tully Borland & T. Allan Hillman - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (3):399-429.
    Most agree that Scotus is a voluntarist of some kind. In this paper we argue against recent interpretations of Scotus’s ethics according to which the norms concerning human actions are largely, if not wholly, the arbitrary products of God’s will. On our reading, the Scotistic variety of voluntarism on offer is much more nuanced. Key to our interpretation is keeping distinct what is too often conflated: the reasons why Scotus maintains that the laws of the Second Table of the Decalogue (...)
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  18.  1
    In Defense of Conciliar Christology: A Philosophical Essay. By Timothy Pawl. [REVIEW]Kenneth Boyce - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (3):495-497.
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  19.  3
    Knowing as Being? A Metaphysical Reading of the Identity of Intellect and Intelligibles in Aquinas.Therese Scarpelli Cory - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (3):333-351.
    I argue that Thomas Aquinas’s Identity Formula—the statement that the “intellect in act is the intelligible in act”—does not, as is usually supposed, express his position on how the intellect accesses extramental realities. Instead, it should be understood as a claim about the metaphysics of intellection, according to which the perfection requisite for performing the act of understanding is what could be called “intellectual-intelligible being.” In reinterpreting Aquinas’s Identity Formula, I explore the notion of being “in act” as an intellect (...)
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  20.  1
    Prima Secundae, Q. 18 and De Malo, Q. 2.Diem William Matthew - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (3):447-471.
    This essay examines the role that circumstances play in determining the morality of moral acts as presented in ST I-II, q. 18 and argues that q. 18 uses two different sets of principles that are left unreconciled in the text. The paper argues that consequently the text is not coherent but is radically divided; specifically, q. 18 holds both that a circumstance—by virtue of being a true circumstance and accident of the act—can make a good act evil but also that (...)
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  21.  3
    Structure and the Metaphysics of Mind: How Hylomorphism Solves the Mind-Body Problem. By William Jaworski. [REVIEW]Kelly Gallagher - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (3):491-494.
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  22.  1
    Cultivating Virtue: Perspectives From Philosophy, Theology, and Psychology. Edited by Nancy E. Snow. [REVIEW]Giebel Heidi - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (3):500-506.
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  23.  1
    Beyond Non-Being.Matthew K. Minerd - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (3):353-379.
    In Thomistic metaphysics, the domain of ens rationis pertains to a hazy region of “non-real” being, laying outside of the proper scientific subject of metaphysics. In addition to negations and privations, a very important domain of entia rationis pertains to that of relationes rationis, especially such relationes as play a role in human reasoning. Logic, studying these “non-real” relations, thus focuses on a unique, if hazy, realm of “non-being.” While this particular type of ens rationis receives the lion’s share of (...)
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  24.  1
    Aquinas on the Nature of the Human Soul.Soerensen Jennifer - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (3):381-398.
    While examining how Aquinas defends his account of the human soul in Article 2 of On Spiritual Creatures, I will point out the difficulties that arise in determining the nature of the human soul when the very starting question is formulated in the manner of Article 2’s question: “Can a spiritual substance be united to a body?” This way of examining the human soul—beginning by considering pure spiritual substantiality and then considering whether it is possible that spiritual substance can relate (...)
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  25.  1
    Finding Collective Sin and Recompense in Anselm’s Cur Deus Homo.C. Thurow Joshua - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (3):431-446.
    Anselm’s argument in Cur Deus Homo commits him to the existence of collective sin and to Jesus’s offering recompense for the human race’s collective sin. By “collective sin” I mean sin of a collective entity—in this case, the human race. In the bulk of this paper I argue that one of Anselm’s defenses of a crucial assumption of his argument—what I call Anselm’s Principle—can succeed only on the assumption that Jesus offers recompense for the collective sin of the human race. (...)
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  26.  2
    The Divine Energies and the “End of Human Life”.Rico Vitz & Marissa Espinoza - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (3):473-489.
    In this paper, we elucidate an alternative conception of the “end of human life” that Germain Grisez considers but never develops. We then defend this conception against two key objections. We conclude by explaining a few ways that this alternative conception of the “end of human life” is particularly important both theologically and philosophically.
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  27.  1
    The Myth of Liberalism. By John P. Safranek. [REVIEW]Peter J. Younger - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (3):497-500.
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  28.  2
    Socratic Agapē Without Irony in the Euthydemus.Adams Don - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (2):273-298.
    Many scholars find Socratic irony so obvious in the Euthydemus that they don’t bother to cite any textual support when they claim that Socrates does not sincerely mean something he says, e.g., when he praises Euthydemus and his brother. What these scholars overlook is the role of agapē in shaping Socrates’s view of other intellectuals. If we take his agapē into account, it is easy to see that while there is some irony in the Euthydemus, none of it is Socratic.
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  29.  4
    Art Via Theology.Sixto J. Castro - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (2):299-316.
    In this paper I interpret Arthur Danto’s thesis on “the end of art” in eschatological terms. He allows for this by having chosen Joachim of Fiore’s theological theory of the three ages to illuminate his own understanding of art history. I offer some ideas on how this post-history might be understood by means of theological method. I also explore the relationship between the concept of “tradition” and Danto’s concept of “transfiguration.” By means of these analyses I bring out the tendency (...)
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  30.  4
    The Everlasting Check: Hume on Miracles. By Alexander George. [REVIEW]Cobb Ryan - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (2):317-319.
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  31.  2
    Philippa Foot’s So-Called Achilles’ Heel.Jessy Jordan - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (2):251-271.
    Philippa Foot’s attempt in Natural Goodness to defend the claim that moral goodness is a form of species-specific natural goodness and that immorality is a natural defect has elicited a number of challenges. For instance, Scott Woodcock presents the following dilemma: Foot’s account of natural normativity either yields morally objectionable results, or there exists an appeal to a normative standard not grounded in natural norms. I contend that the Footian Neo-Aristotelian approach possesses the resources necessary for an adequate answer to (...)
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  32.  3
    Socrates Among Strangers. By Joseph P. Lawrence. [REVIEW]Timothy Jussaume - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (2):320-323.
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  33.  3
    Essentially Ordered Series Reconsidered Once Again.Gaven Kerr - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (2):155-174.
    Many discussions of per se and per accidens series focus on efficient causality and how a consideration of the metaphysics of the matter can deliver us a primary efficient cause of all that is. Drawing on my own previous work on causal series, I offer in this article a model for the understanding of per se causal series wherein the causality involved is that of finality. I then consider whether or not such per se final causal series are infinite. Finally, (...)
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  34.  8
    Taking Pascal’s Wager: Faith, Evidence and the Abundant Life. By Michael Rota. [REVIEW]Robert C. Koons - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (2):328-331.
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  35.  4
    Feeling and Its Theological Relevance in the Formation of the Human Person According to Edith Stein.Meis Anneliese - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (2):175-198.
    The present study clarifies the theological importance of feeling in the formation of a person, as Edith Stein understands it. Feeling constitutes the originating dimension of the finite spirit, disclosing the dynamic pair of thinking and willing while being capable of anticipating infinite Spirit. A finite spirit is a most real and authentic incarnate spirit when it comprehends itself as stemming from God. The foundations of this formation are to be found in the ontic, historical, dynamic relationship between finite spirit (...)
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  36.  3
    The Cambridge Descartes Lexicon. Edited by Lawrence Nolan. [REVIEW]Andreea Mihali - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (2):324-327.
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  37.  2
    Sebastian Izquierdo on Universals.Daniel D. Novotný - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (2):227-249.
    The paper deals with the theory of universals of Sebastian Izquierdo, a Spanish Jesuit author working in Rome, as he formulated and defended it in Disputation 17 of his major philosophical work The Lighthouse of Sciences, published in Lyon in 1659. Izquierdo’s discussion centers around three questions: What is universality? Is there some intellect-independent universality? What is the nature of the intellect-dependent universality? Izquierdo’s approach may be seen as a search for the third way between the realism of the Thomists (...)
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  38.  2
    Contemplation, Intellectus, and Simplex Intuitus in Aquinas.Van Nieuwenhove Rik - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (2):199-225.
    This contribution examines two related points in relation to Aquinas’s understanding of contemplation, which is a sorely neglected topic in scholarship. First, after having outlined that the final act of contemplation culminates in an intellective, simple apprehension of the truth, I will examine how this act relates to the three operations of the intellect Aquinas identifies in a number of places. Second, I argue that his view of contemplation as simple insight is significantly indebted to Neoplatonic sources; therefore, we must (...)
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  39.  5
    Political Perfectionism and the Moral Acceptability of Pure Paternalism.Adam D. Bailey - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (1):95-112.
    In this essay, I argue against an important position in contemporary perfectionist political philosophy, which holds both that the state is instrumental in nature and that there are principled, rather than merely prudential, limits on the scope of state authority such that pure paternalism is not morally acceptable. By so doing, I provide a conditional defense of the moral acceptability of pure paternalism.
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  40.  12
    Divine Simplicity and Creation of Man.Miguel Brugarolas - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (1):29-51.
    The immense distance between God and creatures is a core statement of Gregory of Nyssa’s thought, which makes it distinctive not only in theology, but also in cosmology, anthropology, and spiritual doctrine. For him, the main distinction between beings that articulates all reality is not that of intelligible and sensible, but the one between infinite God and creatures. This paper, dealing with some selected texts regarding the creation of man, points out the main roots of Gregory’s theism: a high comprehension (...)
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  41.  3
    Analogia Entis: Metaphyiscs: Original Structure and Universal Rhythm. By Erich Przywara.Philip Gonzales - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (1):145-149.
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  42.  4
    Politics as Secondary Belonging.James Greenaway - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (1):73-94.
    Belonging presents a range of problems that have been treated thematically in the social sciences. However, belonging has rarely been explored as an explicit theme in philosophy. That said, many philosophers have implicitly considered the problem of belonging in their own way. In this paper, the work of Emmanuel Levinas is presented and considered, especially where it relates to the political. In outlining Levinas’s thought on fraternity, we are presented with a belonging that is not yet political. It is in (...)
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  43.  1
    Traversing Forgiveness.Jonathan R. Heaps - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (1):53-72.
    In the epilogue to Memory, History, Forgetting, Paul Ricoeur introduces an overlooked “vertical” axis into the problem of forgiveness. This verticality runs from the “depth” of fault to the “height” of forgiveness. For Ricoeur, forgiveness only appears an impossible “exchange” if one excludes this verticality from the question. Instead, he calls forgiveness “difficult” because it traverses from height to depth. This article argues that Ricoeur’s notion of the horizontal and the vertical in Memory, History, Forgetting is best understood as an (...)
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  44.  10
    Before Virtue: Assessing Contemporary Virtue Ethics. By Jonathan J. Sanford.Angela Knobel - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (1):149-152.
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  45.  18
    Is a Thomistic Theory of Intentionality Consistent with Physicalism?James D. Madden - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (1):1-28.
    I argue that a Thomistic theory of intentionality is both philosophically plausible and inconsistent with physicalism. I begin by distinguishing two types of intentionality and two senses in which something can be said to be non-physical. After sketching the relevant background hylomorphic philosophy of nature, I develop a Thomistic theory of intentionality that supports a certain kind of anti-physicalism. I then consider criticisms of the Thomistic theory of intentionality raised by Peter King and Robert Pasnau. In reply I argue that (...)
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  46.  6
    Søren Kierkegaard: Subjectivity, Irony, and the Crisis of Modernity. By Jon Stewart. Mulder Jr - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (1):152-154.
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  47.  5
    Aquinas on Will, Happiness, and God.Daniel Shields - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (1):113-142.
    Aquinas holds that by its nature the human will has happiness as its ultimate end in every choice, and yet he holds that one can and ought to love God more than oneself or one’s own happiness. This generates the so-called “problem of love”: how can an eudaimonist like Aquinas account for non-selfish love? I argue that Aquinas’s doctrine of goodness as the will’s object and his distinction between the love of desire and the love of friendship solve this problem (...)
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  48.  1
    Authenticity as Self-Transcendence: The Enduring Insights of Bernard Lonergan. By Michael H. McCarthy.R. J. Snell - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (1):143-145.
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