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  1.  4
    Catholic Theology After Kierkegaard. By Joshua Furnal.John R. Betz - 2020 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 94 (2):347-350.
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  2.  5
    European Sources of Human Dignity: A Commented Anthology. By Mette Lebech.Sarah Borden Sharkey - 2020 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 94 (2):353-355.
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  3.  2
    Sin: A Thomistic Psychology. By Steven J. Jensen.Andrew Jaspers - 2020 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 94 (2):350-353.
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  4.  7
    Willing Evil.Henrik Lagerlund - 2020 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 94 (2):305-322.
    In this article, I present two virtually unknown sixteenth-century views of human freedom, that is, the views of Bartolomaeus de Usingen and Jodocus Trutfetter on the one hand and John Mair on the other. Their views serve as a natural context and partial background to the more famous debate on human freedom between Martin Luther and Erasmus of Rotterdam from 1524–1526. Usingen and Trutfetter were Luther’s philosophy teachers in Erfurt. In a passage from Book III of John Mair’s commentary on (...)
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  5.  3
    Thomas Aquinas on Natural Inclinations and the Practical Cognition of Human Goods.Justin Matchulat - 2020 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 94 (2):239-271.
    Thomas Aquinas’s thought on how human natural inclinations relate to the cognition of basic human goods has been and continues to be highly disputed. Pointing out the weaknesses of both old and new natural law interpretations, I offer an interpretation that is highly sensitive to Aquinas’s language in key texts on this issue and in addition draws upon texts where Aquinas explicates the relationship between inclination and selective attention. I argue that the natural inclinations primarily play a directive role in (...)
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  6.  2
    The Concept of Christian Philosophy in Edith Stein.Robert McNamara - 2020 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 94 (2):323-346.
    In her mature thought, Edith Stein presents a philosophy that is positively Christian and specifically Catholic. The rationale behind her presentation rests upon three interplaying factors: the nature of philosophy; the nature and state of finite creatures in relation to God; and the meaning of being a Christian. Stein maintains that given the essential imperfection and natural limitation of philosophy as a human science, philosophy lies interiorly open for its elevation and completion through its supplementation by the supernatural contents of (...)
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  7.  4
    The Medieval Reception of Aristotle’s Passage on Natural Justice.José A. Poblete - 2020 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 94 (2):211-238.
    This essay argues that Robert Grosseteste’s Latin translation of Aristotle’s passage on natural justice was philosophically determinant for its medieval reception. By altering the passage, Grosseteste allowed for a reconciliation of prima facie opposing views on natural law, namely: On one hand, the Ciceronian-Stoic and Augustinian-Neoplatonic idea that natural law is primarily immutable; and on the other, Aristotle’s claim that all things that are naturally just are subject to change. Focusing on Albert the Great’s first commentary on the Nicomachean Ethics, (...)
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  8.  4
    Is There a Punishment for Violating the Natural Law?Scott J. Roniger - 2020 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 94 (2):273-304.
    Is there a punishment for violating the natural law? This important question has been neglected in the scholarship on Thomistic natural law theory. I show that there is a three-fold punishment proper to the natural law; the remorse of conscience, the inability to be a friend to oneself, and the inability to be a friend to another work in concert to provide a natural penalty for moral wrongdoing. In order to establish these points, I first analyze sources of St. Thomas (...)
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  9.  3
    Aristotle on the Proper Attitude Toward True Divinity.Mor Segev - 2020 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 94 (2):187-209.
    Aristotle does not explicitly state how it is that one should ideally relate to the true gods of his metaphysics, like the prime mover. He does, however, speak of an unreciprocated relationship of friendship between humans and such gods. I argue that Aristotle’s conception of the magnanimous person sheds light on that relationship. The magnanimous person, who is a philosopher, devalues humanity and devotes her life and efforts to the divine. Thus, contrary to some scholars, Aristotle’s conception of magnanimity resembles (...)
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  10.  6
    Towards a Broader Construal of Evidence.Frederick D. Aquino - 2020 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 94 (1):125-139.
    John Henry Newman’s philosophical reflection on the nature of faith and its relation to evidence is fascinating, complex, and slightly misleading; yet it shows constructive promise. In particular, I argue that his broader construal of reason should concomitantly play out in a broader construal of evidence. Accordingly, I show how Newman’s distinction between different modes of reasoning informs his understanding of the relationship between faith and evidence. I conclude with three areas that deserve further epistemological attention and development: namely, a (...)
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  11.  11
    “Real” and “Notional” in Newman’s Thought.Keith Beaumont - 2020 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 94 (1):27-56.
    Newman’s constant preoccupation with “connectedness” leads him to explore and to insist upon the importance of the relationship between the “notional” and the “real,” and therefore of that between theology and philosophy, on the one hand, and spirituality and morality or ethics, on the other. This paper explores Newman’s expression of these ideas, firstly in his sermons and theological writings, and finally in the more philosophical context of the Grammar of Assent.
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  12.  11
    What Newman Can Give Catholic Philosophers Today.John F. Crosby - 2020 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 94 (1):5-26.
    In this article I explain various points of contact between Newman and the Catholic philosophical tradition. I begin with Newman’s personalism as it is found in the Grammar of Assent, especially in the distinction between notional and real assent, and in the distinction between formal and informal inference. Then I proceed to Newman’s personalism as it is found in his teaching on conscience and on doctrinal development. I then consider Newman as proto-phenomenologist and also as an Augustinian thinker. Finally, I (...)
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  13.  4
    Preface to Special Issue: The Philosophical Legacy of John Henry Newman.John F. Crosby - 2020 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 94 (1):1-3.
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  14.  3
    Aesthetic Rationality.William A. Frank - 2020 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 94 (1):91-103.
    Despite Newman’s negligible direct familiarity with the works and thought of John Duns Scotus, there has been recent discussion of affinities between the two along a range of philosophical approaches and sensibilities. These notes introduce the thesis that both Scotus and Newman share a disposition to appeal to aesthetic rationality when it comes to asserting certain basic truths critical to Christian understanding. Recent Scotus studies have demonstrated the deep and pervasive presence of the aesthetic dimension in Duns Scotus’s thought. In (...)
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  15.  34
    Newman’s Argument From Conscience.Logan Paul Gage - 2020 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 94 (1):141-157.
    Recent authors, emphasizing Newman’s distaste for natural theology—especially William Paley’s design argument—have urged us to follow Newman’s lead and reject design arguments. But I argue that Newman’s own argument for God’s existence (his argument from conscience) fails without a supplementary design argument or similar reason to think our faculties are truth-oriented. In other words, Newman appears to need the kind of argument he explicitly rejects. Finding Newman’s rejection of natural theology to stem primarily from factors other than worries about cogency, (...)
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  16.  2
    Newman’s Skeptical Paradox.Joe Milburn - 2020 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 94 (1):105-123.
    John Henry Newman starts the second half of the Grammar of Assent by laying out a “paradox,” and he announces that the purpose of the following chapters of the book is to resolve it. Surprisingly, recent scholarship has tended not to question the nature of this paradox. In this paper, I argue that we should understand Newman’s paradox to be a kind of skeptical paradox that arises when we accept “Lockean rationalism.” I then show how Newman deals with the paradox. (...)
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  17.  7
    St. John Henry Newman, Cardinal Matthew of Aquasparta, and Bl. John Duns Scotus on Knowledge, Assent, Faith, and Non-Evident Truths.Timothy B. Noone - 2020 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 94 (1):73-89.
    While working on various medieval philosophers, I have noticed an affinity between their remarks on the reasonableness of accepting propositions that are not matters of proof and strict deduction and St. John Henry Newman’s remarks that we accept unconditionally and rightly everyday ordinary propositions without calibrating them to demonstrable arguments. In particular, Cardinal Matthew of Aquasparta and Blessed John Duns Scotus both claim there is a sense in which assent to everyday propositions is tantamount to knowledge, even though there is (...)
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  18. Newman on Natural and Revealed Religion.Cyril O’Regan - 2020 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 94 (1):159-186.
    This essay reflects on Newman’s famous analyses of natural and revealed religion and their relation in the tenth and final chapter of the Grammar of Assent. There are two lines of reflection, the first internalist, the second externalist. On the first front, the essay draws attention to how conscience plays a foundational role in Newman’s discussion of natural religion and how it helps to distinguish it from the “religion of civilization,” which Newman considers to be a rationalist substitute for the (...)
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  19.  8
    The Heart in Newman’s Thought.Robert E. Wood - 2020 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 94 (1):57-72.
    Newman’s view of the heart corresponds with the recent Catechism of the Catholic Church. His motto, Cor ad cor loquitur, exhibits his central religious preoccupation. There are three factors involved in religious existence: intellectual apprehension, emotional realization, and moral action. The center, located in the heart, is typically considered secondary: clear conception and moral action are all that is required. For Newman, this is truncated religion, for religion has its deepest root in the heart. Here is where he considers conscience. (...)
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