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  1. Determinism and Divine Blame.John Ross Churchill - 2017 - Faith and Philosophy 34 (4):425-448.
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  2. On Climacus’s “Against Reason” Thesis.Eleanor Helms - 2017 - Faith and Philosophy 34 (4):471-488.
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  3. The Will to Reason: Theodicy and Freedom in Descartes, by C. P. Ragland.Kelahan Emily - 2017 - Faith and Philosophy 34 (4):505-509.
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  4.  1
    God Over All: Divine Aseity and the Challenge of Platonism, by William Lane Craig.Mary Leng - 2017 - Faith and Philosophy 34 (4):497-504.
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  5. Plantinga’s Religious Epistemology, Skeptical Theism, and Debunking Arguments.Andrew Moon - 2017 - Faith and Philosophy 34 (4):449-470.
    Alvin Plantinga’s religious epistemology has been used to respond to many debunking arguments against theistic belief. However, critics have claimed that Plantinga’s religious epistemology conflicts with skeptical theism, a view often used in response to the problem of evil. If they are correct, then a common way of responding to debunking arguments conflicts with a common way of responding to the problem of evil. In this paper, I examine the critics’ claims and argue that they are right. I then present (...)
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  6. Evidentialism and the Will to Believe, by Scott F. Aikin.Pace Michael - 2017 - Faith and Philosophy 34 (4):489-496.
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  7. Humility in the Deficient.Claire Brown Peterson - 2017 - Faith and Philosophy 34 (4):403-424.
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  8. God’s Standing to Forgive.Brandon Warmke - 2017 - Faith and Philosophy 34 (4):381-402.
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  9.  12
    The Eucharistic Conquest of Time.Pavel Butakov - 2017 - Faith and Philosophy 34 (3):247-271.
    Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox theologians claim that the unique event of Christ’s sacrifice on Calvary is present in Eucharistic liturgies. A popular explanatory strategy for this miraculous presence suggests that due to its supernatural character the Eucharist “conquers time,” transcends its boundaries, and allows for temporal coincidence of two chronologically distant events. I discuss the four main approaches within this strategy that can be discovered in contemporary theological writings. The first approach implies a time travel of the Calvary event. (...)
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  10.  6
    Christian Cyborgs.Benedikt Paul Göcke - 2017 - Faith and Philosophy 34 (3):347-364.
    Should or shouldn’t Christians endorse the transhumanist agenda of changing human nature in ways fitting to one’s needs? To answer this question, we first have to be clear on what precisely the thesis of transhumanism entails that we are going to evaluate. Once this point is clarified, I argue that Christians can in principle fully endorse the transhumanist agenda because there is nothing in Christian faith that is in contradiction to it. In fact, given certain plausible moral assumptions, Christians should (...)
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  11.  11
    Idealism and Christian Theology, Edited by Joshua R. Farris and S. Mark Hamilton. [REVIEW]Kenneth L. Pearce - 2017 - Faith and Philosophy 34 (3):365-369.
  12.  5
    Divine Forgiveness and Reconciliation.Jada Twedt Strabbing - 2017 - Faith and Philosophy 34 (3):272-297.
    I argue that divine forgiveness is God’s openness to reconciliation with us, the wrongdoers, with respect to our wrongdoing. The main advantage of this view is that it explains the power of divine forgiveness to reconcile us to God when we repent. As I show, this view also fits well with the parable of the prodigal son, which is commonly taken to illustrate divine forgiveness, and it accounts for the close connection between divine forgiveness and Christ’s atonement. Finally, I demonstrate (...)
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  13.  2
    What is a Merciful Heart?Rico Vitz - 2017 - Faith and Philosophy 34 (3):298-320.
    In this paper, I argue that Christ’s second love command implies not only that people’s volitions and actions be Christ-like, but also that their affective-motivational dispositions be Christ-like. More specifically, I argue that the command implies that people have aretaic obligations to strive to cultivate a merciful heart with the kind of affective depth described by St. Isaac of Syria in his 71st ascetical homily—i.e., one that is disposed to becoming inflamed, such that it is gripped by “strong and vehement (...)
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  14.  2
    The Fall and Hypertime, by Hud Hudson. [REVIEW]Edward Wierenga - 2017 - Faith and Philosophy 34 (3):370-377.
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  15.  5
    Unity of Action in a Latin Social Model of the Trinity.Scott M. Williams - 2017 - Faith and Philosophy 34 (3):321-346.
    I develop a Latin Social model of the Trinity that is an extension of my previous article on indexicals and the Trinity. I focus on the theological desideratum of the necessity of the divine persons’ unity of action. After giving my account of this, I compare it with Swinburne’s and Hasker’s social models and Leftow’s non-social model. I argue that their accounts of the divine persons’ unity of action are theologically unsatisfactory and that this unsatisfactoriness derives from a modern conception (...)
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  16.  22
    How to Tell Whether Christians and Muslims Worship the Same God.Tomas Bogardus & Mallorie Urban - 2017 - Faith and Philosophy 34 (2):176-200.
    Do Muslims and Christians worship the same God? We answer: it depends. To begin, we clear away some specious arguments surrounding this issue, to make room for the central question: What determines the reference of a name, and under what conditions do names shift reference? We’ll introduce Gareth Evans’s theory of reference, on which a name refers to the dominant source of information in that name’s “dossier,” and we then develop the theory’s notion of dominance. We conclude that whether Muslims’ (...)
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  17.  5
    Atheistic Prayer.Shieva Kleinschmidt - 2017 - Faith and Philosophy 34 (2):152-175.
    In this paper I will argue, contrary to common assumptions, that rational atheistic prayer is possible. I will formulate and respond to two powerful arguments against the possibility of atheistic prayer: first, an argument that the act of prayer involves an intention to communicate to God, precluding disbelief in God’s existence; second, an argument claiming that reaching out to God through prayer requires believing God might exist, precluding rational disbelief in God. In showing options for response to these arguments, I (...)
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  18.  6
    Skeptical Theism: New Essays, Ed. Trent Dougherty and Justin P. McBrayer. [REVIEW]Jeff Snapper - 2017 - Faith and Philosophy 34 (2):235-243.
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  19. Reconciliation, Incarnation, and Headless Hegelianism.Dennis Vanden Auweele - 2017 - Faith and Philosophy 34 (2):201-222.
    A number of contemporary authors claim that Hegel’s Religionsphilosophie provides important insights for contemporary philosophy of religion. John Caputo argues that Hegel’s notion of incarnation as radical kenosis is a powerful tool for postmodern Radical Theology. In this essay, I scrutinize this claim by balancing Hegel’s notion of incarnation with his notion of recognition—the latter of which Caputo removes from a “headless Hegelianism.” I argue that a non-Hegelian, non-dialectic sense of recognition ought to be introduced in contemporary philosophy of religion (...)
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  20.  2
    Anselm on Free Choice and Character Formation.Thomas Williams - 2017 - Faith and Philosophy 34 (2):223-234.
    Character formation is a central theme in Katherin Rogers’s Freedom and Self-Creation: Anselmian Libertarianism. According to Rogers, Anselm holds that the purpose of free choice is to afford creatures the possibility of creating their own characters through their free choices. I argue that Anselm has no doctrine of character formation. Accordingly, he does not hold the view of the purpose of free choice that Rogers attributes to him. Creatures cannot bring about justice in themselves, let alone increase it by their (...)
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  21.  42
    Commonsense, Skeptical Theism, and Different Sorts of Closure of Inquiry Defeat.Curtis Rutledge Jonathan - 2017 - Faith and Philosophy 34 (1):17-32.
    Trent Dougherty argues (contra Jonathan Matheson) that when taking into consideration the probabilities involving skeptical theism (ST) and gratuitous evils, an agent may reasonably affirm both ST and that gratuitous evils exist. In other words, Dougherty thinks that assigning a greater than .5 probability to ST is insufficient to defeat the commonsense problem of evil. I argue that Dougherty’s response assumes, incorrectly, that ST functions solely as an evidential defeater, and that, when understood as a closure of inquiry defeater, ST (...)
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  22.  6
    A Surviving Version of the Common Sense Problem of Evil.Jerome Gellman - 2017 - Faith and Philosophy 34 (1):82-92.
    Chris Tweedt has offered a solution to the “common sense problem of evil,” on which that there is gratuitous evil is justified non-inferentially as a trivial inference from non-inferentially justified premises by invoking versions of CORNEA. Tweedt claims his solution applies not only to the versions of the common sense problem of evil offered by Paul Draper and Trent Dougherty, but also to that offered by me in this journal in 1992. Here I argue that Tweedt fails to defeat this (...)
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  23.  6
    Analogy in Aquinas.Joshua Lee Harris - 2017 - Faith and Philosophy 34 (1):33-56.
    In the last decade there arose a debate between William P. Alston and Nicholas Wolterstorff on the subject of Thomas Aquinas’s doctrine of analogia—that is, the position that perfection terms, when properly predicated of God and of creatures, are distinct, yet related in meaning. Whereas Alston interprets Aquinas to hold this well-known position before criticizing it, Wolterstorff argues that Aquinas actually did not hold the position as it is usually presented. In this paper, I show why Alston’s “orthodox” interpretation is (...)
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  24.  4
    Molinism’s Freedom Problem.William Hasker - 2017 - Faith and Philosophy 34 (1):93-106.
    Arthur Cunningham has asserted that my argument targeting the “freedom problem” for Molinism is unsuccessful. I show that while he has correctly identified two minor problems with the argument, Cunningham’s main criticisms are ineffective. This is mainly because he has failed to appreciate the complex dialectical situation created by the use of a reductio ad absurdum argument. The result is to underscore the difficulty for Molinism of the freedom problem.
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  25.  3
    In Defense of Conciliar Christology: A Philosophical Essay, by Timothy Pawl. [REVIEW]Andrew Ter Ern Loke - 2017 - Faith and Philosophy 34 (1):114-119.
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  26.  50
    Counterpossible Dependence and the Efficacy of the Divine Will.Kenneth L. Pearce - 2017 - Faith and Philosophy 34 (1):3-16.
    The will of an omnipotent being would be perfectly efficacious. Alexander Pruss and I have provided an analysis of perfect efficacy that relies on non-trivial counterpossible conditionals. Scott Hill has objected that not all of the required counterpossibles are true of God. Sarah Adams has objected that perfect efficacy of will (on any analysis) would be an extrinsic property and so is not suitable as a divine attribute. I argue that both of these objections can be answered if the divine (...)
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  27.  8
    Anger and Forgiveness: Resentment, Generosity, Justice, by Martha Nussbaum. [REVIEW]Glen Pettigrove - 2017 - Faith and Philosophy 34 (1):110-114.
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  28.  17
    Kant’s Highest Good: The 'Beck-Silber Controversy' in the Spanish-Speaking World.Alonso Villarán - 2017 - Faith and Philosophy 34 (1):57-81.
    In the 1960s Lewis White Beck criticized Kant’s highest good as a moral concept. In 1963 John Silber responded. Thus, the “Beck-Silber controversy.” This paper explores such controversy in the Spanish literature. It begins identifying four criticisms: the problems of heteronomy, derivation, impossibility, and irrelevance. It then identifies a new problem rescued from the Spanish literature: dualism. After categorizing, following Matthew Caswell, the Spanish defenses into revisionists, secularizers, and maximalists, this paper assesses these defenses. The paper also translates sections of (...)
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  29.  3
    Vainglory: The Forgotten Vice, by Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung. [REVIEW]W. Jay Wood - 2017 - Faith and Philosophy 34 (1):107-110.
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