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  1.  3
    ‘I Have an Empty Head on Love’: The Theme of Love in Derrida, or Derrida and the Literary Space.Michal Ben-Naftali - 2018 - Oxford Literary Review 40 (2):221-237.
    The essay examines several scenes of love in deconstruction, in an attempt to understand why Derrida claims to have ‘an empty head on love in general’, as he says in a film dedicated to his work. Beginning with ‘Romeo and Juliet’ up to Abraham's sacrificial responsibility, the essay aims to interpret Derrida's withdrawal to silence about love as enacting the erotic literary space of his own writing.
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  2.  1
    Editors’ Introduction.Luke Donahue & Adam R. Rosenthal - 2018 - Oxford Literary Review 40 (2):143-146.
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  3.  1
    Force of Love.Elissa Marder - 2018 - Oxford Literary Review 40 (2):206-220.
    Despite the enormous changes in feminism, philosophy and literary theory since 1975, the year in which Hélène Cixous first wrote the small manifesto by which she remains best known, ‘The Laugh of the Medusa’ continues to find generations of new readers who, upon discovering it, often declare their passionate love for it. This essay explores the relation between the enduring love that this text continues to inspire and the deconstruction of love that is inscribed within it. Irreverently and playfully drawing (...)
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  4.  2
    The Death Penalty Within the Bounds of Life/Death Alone: From the Deconstruction of Life to the Possibility of a Future Abolition.Armando Mastrogiovanni - 2018 - Oxford Literary Review 40 (2):181-205.
    This paper situates Derrida's two-year seminar on The Death Penalty within the new thinking of life he often insists lies at the heart of deconstruction. Derrida argues that the philosophical tradition is fundamentally unable to conceive of a principled opposition to the death penalty because within its system, the latter is both the quasi-transcendental condition of possibility of law in general and the very ‘proper of man’—the sacrificial machinery that makes human life inviolable. Against this tradition, Derrida advances the love (...)
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  5. Love of Life: Deconstruction, Biotech & the Survival of Indefinite Life.Adam R. Rosenthal - 2018 - Oxford Literary Review 40 (2):156-180.
    Derrida's concept of survival, born out of Benjamin's work on translation in The Task of the Translator, has become a fixed element of readings of his work in recent years. Of particular interest in his final seminars on The Beast and the Sovereign and The Death Penalty, survival might be said to do to the concept of life what writing had done to that of speech. In this essay, I explore how the Derridean concept of survival, far from excluding dreams (...)
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  6.  1
    Loving the Other Beyond Death.Kas Saghafi - 2018 - Oxford Literary Review 40 (2):147-155.
    Turning to an example provided by Aristotle and taken up by Derrida in Politics of Friendship, which functions as a limit case—loving the other beyond death—I argue that Derrida's short-lived term, aimance, gently and lovingly contests the primacy given either to love or to friendship in the Western tradition, but also to the living act of loving and the figure of the lover, putting pressure on the very conceptual differences between these terms.
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  7. Barry Sheils and Julie Walsh, Eds., Narcissism, Melancholia and the Subject of Community.Joseph R. Shafer - 2018 - Oxford Literary Review 40 (2):266-271.
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  8. When Silence Strikes: Derrida, Heidegger, Mallarmé.Rodrigo Therezo - 2018 - Oxford Literary Review 40 (2):238-262.
    This paper attempts to rethink difference and divisibility as conditions of possibility for love and survival in the wake of Derrida's newly discovered—and just recently published—Geschlecht III. I argue that Derrida's deconstruction of what he calls ‘the grand logic of philosophy’ allows us to think love and survival without positing unicity as a sine qua non. This hypothesis is tested in and through a deconstructive reading of Heidegger's second essay on Trakl in On the Way to Language, where Heidegger's phonocentrism (...)
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  9.  2
    Ariane Mildenberg, Modernism and Phenomenology: Literature, Philosophy, Art.Eoghan Walls - 2018 - Oxford Literary Review 40 (2):263-266.
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  10.  7
    Misreading Generalised Writing: From Foucault to Speculative Realism and New Materialism.Jonathan Basile - 2018 - Oxford Literary Review 40 (1):20-37.
    Misreadings of Derrida's Of Grammatology were prevalent from the time of its debut, up to the present day. For fifty years, Derrida's generalised textuality has been misread as though he meant there was nothing outside text in the traditional sense. This misreading always serves to re-institute notions of linear temporal progress, either among self-styled avant-garde authors who would like to break with past traditions, or among self-styled conservatives who hope to repeat them. If the binaries that divide these works from (...)
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  11.  1
    Garden Grammatology.Camilla Bostock - 2018 - Oxford Literary Review 40 (1):38-54.
    As I move through the garden, something, a strange species of writing, hovers before me like the perfume of a wild rose. I read the words: Metaphor is a plant. That is to say, plants are metaphors for metaphor. This message, then, this vegetal missive, appears to be constituted by a kind of phyto- or antho-morphism, reading by way of a metaphorical vegetal life. But as I continue to write, as I ‘extend’ myself, as Derrida does, ‘by force of play’, (...)
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  12.  2
    Affirming a Weak Force: The Pious Vow of an Animal to Come?Giustino De Michele - 2018 - Oxford Literary Review 40 (1):55-75.
    The appearance, in 1967, of the name of Jacques Derrida on the scene of contemporary thought was indeed plural; given the number of books published under his signature in that year, but also, more intrinsically, because this appearance was declined under a contradictory aegis: since the beginning, the problem of writing had to struggle between ‘two interpretations of interpretation’, one affirmative, the other nostalgic, between a Nietzschean affirmation and a Rousseauist reverie. This internal debate carried on its labour, remarking itself (...)
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  13. Dmitris Vardoulakis, Freedom From the Free Will.Dylan Fagan - 2018 - Oxford Literary Review 40 (1):132-136.
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  14.  2
    Andrew Benjamin, Virtue in Being: Towards an Ethics of the Unconditioned.Gene Flenady - 2018 - Oxford Literary Review 40 (1):124-132.
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  15. Derrida's Matrix: The Births of Deconstruction.Elissa Marder - 2018 - Oxford Literary Review 40 (1):1-19.
    Many of Derrida's formative texts from 1967 about writing, the trace, supplementarity, death, and différance feature striking liminal references to the figure of the mother and are implicitly haunted by the question of birth. In a pivotal passage of De la grammatologie, Derrida links the very futurity of deconstruction to the emergence of ‘a reading discipline to be born’. In this essay, I show that through his readings of the ‘birth of language’ in Lévi-Strauss and Rousseau, Derrida implicitly invites us (...)
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  16.  4
    We Have Tasted the Powers of the Age to Come: Thinking the Force of the Event—From Dynamis to Puissance.Thomas Clément Mercier - 2018 - Oxford Literary Review 40 (1):76-94.
    Responding to the provocative phrase ‘The Age of Grammatology’, I propose to question the notion of ‘age’, and to interrogate the powers or forces, the dynameis or dynasties attached to the interpretative model of historical periodisation. How may we think the undeniable actuality of the event beyond the sempiternal history of ages, and beyond the traditional, onto-teleological chain of power, possibility, force or dynamis that undergirds such history?
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  17.  3
    Chinoiseries : Hallucinating Derrida Hallucinating China.Laurent Milesi - 2018 - Oxford Literary Review 40 (1):95-107.
    Derrida's treatment of Chinese script as essentially non-phonetic in Of Grammatology has been a recurrent leitmotif among several sinologists and scholars of Chinese origin, particularly in Rey Chow's famous 2001 essay ‘How Inscrutable Chinese Led to Globalized Theory’. Despite forceful refutations of this misconception, the accusation of a fantasizing ‘ethnocentrism thinking itself as anti-ethnocentrism’ has endured and could still be found in a recent 2015 article suggestively titled ‘A Sort of European Hallucination: On Derrida's “Chinese Prejudice”’. This essay will probe (...)
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  18.  3
    Logonomocentrism in Of Grammatology's ‘Exergue’.Gabriel Rezende - 2018 - Oxford Literary Review 40 (1):108-123.
    Of Grammatology's ‘Exergue’ contemplates the closure of an historico-metaphysical epoch, that of logocentrism. The notion of ‘epochality’ cannot be reduced to the idea of a ‘period of time’ or a ‘system of chronology’. Reading Martin Heidegger's ‘epochs of Being’ and Carl Schmitt's ‘nomos of the Earth’, I argue that logocentrism has a fundamental colonial character. Derrida is concerned with a space ordering, a land-appropriation process on the verge of becoming global. Logocentrism is always a logonomocentrism.
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