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  1.  1
    The Posthumanist Child: Pharmakon and Collodi's Pinocchio.Lindsay Burton - 2019 - Oxford Literary Review 41 (2):202-218.
    The childlike elements of deconstruction—deconstruction's suggestion of play—require an interdisciplinary attention that they have previously not been afforded in scholarly discourse on Derrida. The power of the child in children's literature scholarship has similarly been immune to binary-disrupting forces common in adjacent literary fields; such immunity has been granted under the banner of ‘aetonormativity,’ which norms adult power while subverting that of the child. In light of the posthumanist turn in critical thinking, which demands a dissolution of binaries in favour (...)
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  2.  3
    On Deconstruction and Childhood.Hélène Cixous & Jacques Derrida - 2019 - Oxford Literary Review 41 (2):149-159.
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  3. Thinking with Deconstruction: Book-Adult-Child Events in Children's Literature Research.Justyna Deszcz-Tryhubczak - 2019 - Oxford Literary Review 41 (2):185-201.
    As Nathalie op de Beeck has recently pointed out, children's literature scholars need to forge more meaningful connexions between ecoliteracy and environmental action to create possibilities for achieving environmental justice. I propose that we achieve this goal by deconstructing our research practices and subjectivities through promoting the participation of children as active contributors to all elements of the research process. Such approaches enable young decision-makers to engage with one another, with books and with the world through ethics of interconnectivity. I (...)
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  4. Taking Age Out of Play: Children's Animistic Philosophising Through a Picturebook.Joanna Haynes & Karin Murris - 2019 - Oxford Literary Review 41 (2):290-309.
    This paper emerges from experiences of putting picturebooks, philosophy with children and posthumanism into play. Responding to Derrida's notion of a ‘return to childhood’, we propose a different move of ‘re-turning to child/ren’, drawing from various entangled sources. First, the figuration of posthuman child disrupts the conception of temporality that takes development and progress as inevitable. The posthuman child expresses the idea of the knowing subject as an unbounded sympoietic system. We put to work Miranda Fricker's notion of epistemic injustice (...)
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  5.  1
    Beatrix Potter's Mycological Aesthetics.Erica Kanesaka Kalnay - 2019 - Oxford Literary Review 41 (2):160-184.
    This essay argues that Beatrix Potter's work on mushrooms reveals the ways in which the Western ecological imaginary has responded to Victorian and Edwardian notions of childhood animism. It finds Potter's ‘mycological aesthetics’, or the interplay between attention and imagination that characterises her work, lingering in present-day ecocritical thinking that aims to dismantle the binary constructs underwriting human exceptionalism.
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  6.  1
    The Case of The Case of Peter Pan or the Impossibility of Children's Fiction: Deconstruction, Psychoanalysis, Childhood, Animality.Karín Lesnik-Oberstein - 2019 - Oxford Literary Review 41 (2):238-257.
    This article argues a different understanding to that in children's literature studies more widely of the implications of the work of Jacqueline Rose in The Case of Peter Pan or: The Impossibility of Children's Fiction for thinking about childhood, animality and children's literature and links these implications to the similar implications of Jacques Derrida's thinking about the child and animality. In both cases, the child and the animal are seen not as psycho-biological entities nor as products of social constructivism nor (...)
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  7.  1
    Four-Footed Weakness: Childhood and Neoteny in Oedipus Rex.Rodolfo Piskorski - 2019 - Oxford Literary Review 41 (2):258-273.
    That Sophocles’ Oedipus Rex is concerned with childhood is something of a truism, but there are ways in which this holds true that go beyond its contribution to the Freudian theory of infantile sexuality. The riddle posed by the sphinx, whose solving cements Oedipus’ incestuous marriage, foregrounds infancy and its similarities to and differences from other life stages. More than that, it illustrates a difference between humans and other animals via a recapitulationist perspective that summarises the evolution of the human (...)
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  8.  1
    Deconstruction, Birth and the Child to Come.Adam R. Rosenthal - 2019 - Oxford Literary Review 41 (2):274-289.
    This essay examines Derrida's discussion, alongside Elisabeth Roudinesco, of the stability of the family unit in For What Tomorrow… By following Derrida's serial revisions of Roudinesco's claim that ‘the family is eternal’, it shows how the questions of the child and child-birth come front and centre for Derrida in theorizing the family unit. As Derrida points out, to be a ‘mother’ or a ‘father’ is ultimately less a question of genetic, or blood relation, than it is one of a role (...)
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  9.  13
    Atomic Afrofuturism and Amiri Baraka's Compulsive Futures.Kristin George Bagdanov - 2019 - Oxford Literary Review 41 (1):51-67.
    In 1984, the same year that scholars were gathering at Cornell University to theorise ‘Nuclear Criticism,’ Amiri Baraka was formulating his own version of nuclear futurity in Primitive World: An An...
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  10.  10
    Puss in Boots Goes to Pleistocene Park.Vincent Bruyère - 2019 - Oxford Literary Review 41 (1):127-140.
    In this essay, EXT marks the spot where extinction leaves us grieving without grieving protocols—as if there was indeed a time that, paradoxically, only species extinction itself could afford. EXT...
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  11.  20
    Slavery and the Trumpocene: It's Not the End of the World.Claire Colebrook - 2019 - Oxford Literary Review 41 (1):40-50.
    There is something more catastrophic than the end of the world, especially when ‘world’ is understood as the horizon of meaning and expectation that has composed the West. If the Anthropocene is th...
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  12.  18
    Quenched: Five Fires for Thinking Extinction.Jemma Deer - 2019 - Oxford Literary Review 41 (1):1-17.
    By the light or remains of five fires, this paper considers how the current extinction crisis might be thought in relation to the future and the past, to speed and acceleration, to ir/reversibility...
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  13.  13
    & Co-Graphy.Thomas Dutoit - 2019 - Oxford Literary Review 41 (1):68-87.
    & co-graphy names here writing experienced as differance of ‘now’ and ‘then’, of memory and erasure called here ‘saw’ and ‘was’ and the rupture that const...
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  14.  7
    Extinction and Thalassal Regression.Philippe Lynes - 2019 - Oxford Literary Review 41 (1):107-126.
    This essay examines certain intersections between writing and extinction through an eco-deconstructive account of the psychoanalysis of water. Jacques Derrida has often drawn attention to the inter...
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  15.  8
    Ghosts of Extinction: An Essay in Spectral Ecopolitics.Frédéric Neyrat - 2019 - Oxford Literary Review 41 (1):88-106.
    We are not only threatened by the Sixth Extinction, but also haunted. Coming back from the future, the Ghosts of History — some para-Benjaminian creatures—try to tell us how serious the threat is....
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  16.  11
    Psychic Extinctness.Jonty Tiplady - 2019 - Oxford Literary Review 41 (1):18-39.
    What we write about, calling it ext for short if we like, when we write about extinction, and what we mean when we refer by choice or otherwise to an extinction drive that is not coterminous with d...
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