Monash Bioethics Review

ISSNs: 1321-2753, 1836-6716

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  1.  13
    Health professionals’ knowledge about ethical criteria in the allocation of resources in the COVID-19 pandemic.Priscila Kelly da Silva Neto, Marcela Tavares de Souza, Aline Russomano de Gouvêa, Luciana Regina Ferreira da Mata, Bruna Moretti Luchesi & Juliana Dias Reis Pessalacia - 2023 - Monash Bioethics Review 41 (2):181-197.
    Due to the rapid advance of the pandemic caused by COVID-19, several countries perceived that human and material resources would be insufficient to meet the demand of infected patients. The aim of this study is to analyze the knowledge of health professionals working in the pandemic about the application of ethical criteria in decision-making in situations of resource scarcity. This is a cross-sectional, descriptive, and quantitative survey study, conducted from June to December 2020, with health professionals working in the COVID-19 (...)
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  2.  15
    Protecting civil Liberties in a cognitively enhanced future: the role of classical liberalism.Michael Gentzel - 2023 - Monash Bioethics Review 41 (2):103-123.
    A prominent concern in the literature on the ethics of human enhancement is that unequal access to future technology will exacerbate existing societal inequalities. The philosopher Daniel Wikler has argued that a futuristic cognitively enhanced majority would be justified in restricting the civil liberties of the unenhanced minority population for their own good in the same way that, mutatis mutandis, the cognitively normal majority are now justified in restricting the civil liberties of those deemed to be cognitively incompetent. Contrary to (...)
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  3. Defending the de dicto approach to the non-identity problem.Joona Räsänen - 2023 - Monash Bioethics Review 41 (2):124-135.
    Is it wrong to create a blind child, for example by in vitro fertilization, if you could create a sighted child instead? Intuitively many people believe it is wrong, but this belief is difficult to justify. When there is a possibility to create and select either ‘blind’ or ‘sighted’ embryos choosing a set of ‘blind’ embryos seems to harm no-one since choosing ‘sighted’ embryos would create a different child altogether. So when the parents choose ‘blind’ embryos, they give some specific (...)
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  4.  32
    Is a deaf future an “Open” future? Reconsidering the open future argument against deaf embryo selection.Paul A. Tubig - 2023 - Monash Bioethics Review 41 (2):136-155.
    One prominent argument against the use of preimplantation genetic diagnosis to select a deaf embryo with the aim of creating a deaf child is that it violates the child’s right to an open future. This paper challenges the open future argument against deaf embryo selection, criticizing its major premise that deafness limits a child’s opportunity range in ways that compromise their future autonomy. I argue that this premise is not justified and is supported by negative presumptions about deaf embodiments that (...)
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  5.  28
    Efficiency and the futures market in organs.Andreas Albertsen - 2023 - Monash Bioethics Review 41 (1):66-81.
    There has been considerable debate over regulated organ markets. Especially current markets, where people sell one of their kidneys while still alive, have received increased attention. Futures markets remain an interesting and under-discussed alternative specification of a market-based solution to the organ shortage. Futures markets pertain to the sale of the right to procure people’s organs after they die. There is a wide range of possible specifications of the futures market. There are, however, some major unaddressed efficiency concerns. This article (...)
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  6.  15
    How did organ donation in Israel become a club membership model? From civic to communal solidarity in organ sharing.Hagai Boas - 2023 - Monash Bioethics Review 41 (1):49-65.
    Figuring out what pushes individuals to become organ donors has become the holy grail of social scientists interested in transplantations. In this paper I concentrate on solidarity as a determinant of organ donation and examine it through the history of organ donation in Israel. By following the history of transplantation policies since 1968 and examining them in relation to different types of solidarities, this paper leads to a nuanced understanding of the ties between solidarity and health policy. Attempts to foster (...)
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  7.  10
    Pharmacological Prophylaxes against Moral Injury.Ned Dobos - 2023 - Monash Bioethics Review 41 (1):37-48.
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  8.  9
    Resistance and the delivery of healthcare in Australian immigration detention centres.Ryan Essex & Michael Dudley - 2023 - Monash Bioethics Review 41 (1):82-95.
    There are few issues that have been as vexing for the Australian healthcare community as the Australian governments policy of mandatory, indefinite, immigration detention. While many concepts have been used to begin to describe the many dilemmas faced by healthcare professionals and their resolution, they are limited, perhaps most fundamentally by the fact that immigration detention is antithetical to health and wellbeing. Furthermore, and while most advice recognises that the abolition of detention is the only option in overcoming these issues, (...)
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  9.  20
    The relationship between speculation and translation in Bioethics: methods and methodologies.Tess Johnson & Elizabeth Chloe Romanis - 2023 - Monash Bioethics Review 41 (1):1-19.
    There are increasing pressures for bioethics to emphasise ‘translation’. Against this backdrop, we defend ‘speculative bioethics’. We explore speculation as an important tool and line of bioethical inquiry. Further, we examine the relationship between speculation and translational bioethics and posit that speculation can support translational work. First, speculative research might be conducted as ethical analysis of contemporary issues through a new lens, in which case it supports translational work. Second, speculation might be a first step prior to translational work on (...)
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  10.  11
    Ethical issues in military bioscience.Rain Liivoja & Ned Dobos - 2023 - Monash Bioethics Review 41 (1):1-5.
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  11.  9
    Whose side are you on? Complexities arising from the non-combatant status of military medical personnel.Michael C. Reade - 2023 - Monash Bioethics Review 41 (1):67-86.
    Since the mid-1800s, clergy, doctors, other clinicians, and military personnel who specifically facilitate their work have been designated “non-combatants”, protected from being targeted in return for providing care on the basis of clinical need alone. While permitted to use weapons to protect themselves and their patients, they may not attempt to gain military advantage over an adversary. The rationale for these regulations is based on sound arguments aimed both at reducing human suffering, but also the ultimate advantage of the nation-state (...)
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  12.  7
    Taking embodiment seriously in public policy and practice: adopting a procedural approach to health and welfare.Joseph T. F. Roberts - 2023 - Monash Bioethics Review 41 (1):20-48.
    It is a common refrain amongst phenomenologists, disability theorists, and feminist legal theorists that medical practice pays insufficient attention to people’s embodiment. The complaint that we take insufficient account of people’s embodiment isn’t limited to the clinical interaction. It has also been directed at healthcare regulation and welfare policy. In this paper, I examine the arguments for taking embodiment seriously in both medical practice and welfare policy, concluding we have good reasons to take better account of people’s embodiment. I then (...)
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  13.  10
    A review of G. R. McLean, ethical basics for the caring professions: knowledge and skills for thoughtful practice (1st ed. Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2022. 240 p.). [REVIEW]Michael Shepanski - 2023 - Monash Bioethics Review 41 (1):96-98.
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  14.  4
    How to love animals: and protect our planet Henry Mance New York: Vintage Books, 2022; paperback, 400 pp., £9.99, ISBN: 9781529112146. [REVIEW]B. V. E. Hyde - 2023 - Monash Bioethics Review 41 (S1):99-101.
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  15.  19
    The relationship between speculation and translation in bioethics: methods and methodologies.Tess Johnson & Elizabeth Chloe Romanis - 2023 - Monash Bioethics Review 1:doi: 10.1007/s40592-023-00181-z.
    There are increasing pressures for bioethics research to have translational purposes. Against this backdrop, we argue in defense of speculative bioethics. We explore methods of speculation and their importance. Further, we examine the relationship between speculative bioethics and translational bioethics and posit that they are not dimorphous enterprises, but often support each other. First, speculative research might be conducted as ethical analysis of contemporary issues through a new lens, in which case it is a means of conducting translational work. Second, (...)
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