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  1. Marks, Nicola J., Mackie, Vera., Ferber, Sarah. IVF and Assisted Reproduction: A Global History. Singapore: Springer Singapore, 2020, Pp. 361. [REVIEW]Andrea Boggio - 2021 - Monash Bioethics Review 39 (2):177-179.
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  2.  2
    The Practitioner as Endangered Citizen: A Genealogy.Tom Koch - 2021 - Monash Bioethics Review 39 (2):157-168.
    Medical practice has always involved at least three roles, three complimentary identities. Practitioners have been at once clinicians dedicated to a patient’s care, members of a professional organization promoting medicine, and informed citizens engaged in public debates on health issues. Beginning in the 1970s, a series of social and technological changes affected, and in many cases restricted, the practitioner’s ability to function equally in these three identities. While others have discussed the changing realities of medical practice in recent decades, none (...)
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  3. Annette Leibing and Silke Schicktanz (Eds): Preventing Dementia?: Critical Perspectives on a New Paradigm of Preparing for Old Age: Berghahn Books, New York / Oxford, 2020. [REVIEW]Julia Perry & Niklas Petersen - 2021 - Monash Bioethics Review 39 (2):180-183.
    Given the lack of effective curative treatment options and in light of a significant reconceptualization of Alzheimer’s disease, the focus of dementia research has shifted towards prevention, risk prediction, and detection in very early disease stages. In the context of these shifts, the edited volume Preventing Dementia?: Critical Perspectives on a New Paradigm of Preparing for Old Age collects critical and insightful positions on the new paradigm of dementia prevention from an interdisciplinary and international perspective. The editors introduce the overarching (...)
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  4.  1
    Friendship as a Framework for Resolving Dilemmas in Clinical Ethics.Michal Pruski - 2021 - Monash Bioethics Review 39 (2):143-156.
    Healthcare professionals often need to make clinical decisions that carry profound ethical implications. As such, they require a tool that will make decision-making intuitive. While the discussion about the principles that should guide clinical ethics has been going on for over two thousand years, it does not seem that making such decisions is becoming any more straight forward. With an abundance of competing ethical systems and frameworks for their application in real life, the clinician is still often not sure how (...)
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  5.  78
    Eugenics Offended.Robert A. Wilson - 2021 - Monash Bioethics Review 39 (2):169-176.
    This commentary continues an exchange on eugenics in Monash Bioethics Review between Anomaly (2018), Wilson (2019), and Veit, Anomaly, Agar, Singer, Fleischman, and Minerva (2021). The eponymous question, “Can ‘Eugenics’ be Defended?”, is multiply ambiguous and does not receive a clear answer from Veit et al.. Despite their stated desire to move beyond mere semantics to matters of substance, Veit et al. concentrate on several uses of the term “eugenics” that pull in opposite directions. I argue, first, that Veit et (...)
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  6.  7
    Sexual Identity or Religious Freedom: Could Conversion Therapy Ever Be Morally Permissible in Limited Urgent Situations? [REVIEW]Owen M. Bradfield - 2021 - Monash Bioethics Review 39 (1):51-59.
    Conversion therapy refers to a range of unscientific, discredited and harmful heterosexist practices that attempt to re-align an individual’s sexual orientation, usually from non-heterosexual to heterosexual. In Australia, the state of Victoria recently joined Queensland and the Australian Capital Territory in criminalising conversion therapy. Although many other jurisdictions have also introduced legislation banning conversion therapy, it persists in over 60 countries. Children are particularly vulnerable to the harmful effects of conversion therapy, which can include coercion, rejection, isolation and blame. However, (...)
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  7.  3
    Human Research Ethics Committees Members: Ethical Review Personal Perceptions. [REVIEW]Marc Fellman, Anne-Marie Irwin, Keagan Brewer, Marguerite Maher, Kevin Watson, Chris Campbell & Boris Handal - 2021 - Monash Bioethics Review 39 (1):94-114.
    This study aims to characterise Human Research Ethics Committee members’ perceptions on five main themes associated with ethics reviews, namely, the nature of research, ethical/moral issues, assent, participants’ risk and HREC prerogatives issues. Three hundred and sixteen HREC members from over 200 HRECs throughout Australia responded to an online questionnaire survey. The results show that in general, HREC members’ beliefs are reasoned and align with sound principles of ethical reviews. There seems to be a disposition for living up to ethical/moral (...)
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  8.  1
    A Framework for Ethics Review of Applications to Store, Reuse and Share Tissue Samples.Ian Kerridge, Cameron Stewart, Wendy Lipworth & Shih-Ning Then - 2021 - Monash Bioethics Review 39 (1):115-124.
    The practice of biobank networking—where biobanks are linked together, and researchers share human tissue samples—is an increasingly common practice both domestically and internationally. The benefits from networking in this way are well established. However, there is a need for ethical oversight in the sharing of human tissue. Ethics committees will increasingly be called upon to approve the sharing of tissue and data with other researchers, often via biobanks, and little guidance currently exists for such committees. In this paper, we provide (...)
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  9.  2
    50 Years of Advance Care Planning: What Do We Call Success?Kerstin Knight - 2021 - Monash Bioethics Review 39 (1):28-50.
    Advance care planning is promoted as beneficial practice internationally. This article critically examines different ways of understanding and measuring success in ACP. It has been 50 years since Luis Kutner first published his original idea of the Living Will, which was thought to be a contract between health carers and patients to provide for instructions about treatment choices in cases of mental incapacity. Its purpose was to extend a patient's right to autonomy and protect health carers from charges of wrong-doing. (...)
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  10. Can ‘Eugenics’ Be Defended?Francesca Minerva, Diana S. Fleischman, Peter Singer, Nicholas Agar, Jonathan Anomaly & Walter Veit - 2021 - Monash Bioethics Review 39 (1):60-67.
  11.  1
    Reflections on Autonomy in Travel for Cross Border Reproductive Care.Anita Stuhmcke - 2021 - Monash Bioethics Review 39 (1):1-27.
    Travel for reproductive health care has become a widespread global phenomenon. Within the field, the decision to travel to seek third parties to assist with reproduction is widely assumed to be autonomous. However there has been scant research exploring the application of the principle of autonomy to the experience of the cross-border traveller. Seeking to contribute to the growing, but still small, body of sociological bioethics research, this paper maps the application of the ethical principle of autonomy to the lived (...)
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  12. Children as Voices and Images for Medicinal Cannabis Law Reform. [REVIEW]Ian Freckelton Ao Qc - 2021 - Monash Bioethics Review 39 (Suppl 1):4-25.
    This article situates the movement for the legalisation of medicinal cannabis within the bigger picture of the impetus toward recreational cannabis legalisation. It describes the role played by children with epileptic syndromes in the medicinal cannabis law reform campaigns in the United Kingdom, and Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria in Australia. Noting the ‘rule of rescue’ and the prominence in media campaigns of children in Australian and English cases of parental disputation with clinicians about treatment for their children, it (...)
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  13. Good Enough? Parental Decisions to Use DIY Looping Technology to Manage Type 1 Diabetes in Children.Carolyn Johnston - 2021 - Monash Bioethics Review 39 (Suppl 1):26-41.
    People are using innovative internet of things technologies to gain individualised management of their type 1 diabetes. The #WeAreNotWaiting movement supports them to build their own hybrid closed loop systems and access their real time blood sugar data via any web connected device. A small number of parents in Australia use such DIY looping systems to manage their child’s type 1 diabetes, but these systems have not been approved by the Therapeutic Goods Administration in Australia, creating ethical dilemmas for clinicians (...)
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  14.  7
    A Step Too Far or a Step in the Wrong Direction? A Critique of the 2014 Amendment to the Belgian Euthanasia Act.Joanna Murdoch - 2021 - Monash Bioethics Review 39 (Suppl 1):103-116.
    In 2014, Article 3 of the the Belgian Euthanasia Act was amended to include the ‘capacity for discernment’ requirement. This paper explores the implications of this highly controversial Amendment. I remain unconvinced of the benefits for children < 12 years old suffering chronic or terminal illnesses. In Part One, I argue that the phrase ‘capacity for discernment’ is problematic and vulnerable to abuse; neither a consistent, widely accepted definition of the phrase has been established nor a standardised method or procedure (...)
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  15.  4
    Fetal Information as Shared Information: Using NIPT to Test for Adult-Onset Conditions.Michelle Taylor-Sands & Hilary Bowman-Smart - 2021 - Monash Bioethics Review 39 (Suppl 1):82-102.
    The possibilities of non-invasive prenatal testing are expanding, and the use of NIPT for adult-onset conditions may become widely available in the near future. If parents use NIPT to test for these conditions, and the pregnancy is continued, they will have information about the child’s genetic predisposition from birth. In this paper, we argue that prospective parents should be able to access NIPT for an adult-onset condition, even when they have no intention to terminate the pregnancy. We begin by outlining (...)
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  16.  2
    Re Imogen: The Role of the Family Court of Australia in Disputes Over Gender Dysphoria Treatment.Michelle Taylor-Sands & Georgina Dimopoulos - 2021 - Monash Bioethics Review 39 (Suppl 1):42-66.
    This article examines Re Imogen 61 Fam LR 344, a decision of the Family Court of Australia, which held that an application to the Family Court is mandatory if a parent or a medical practitioner of a child or adolescent diagnosed with gender dysphoria disputes the diagnosis, the capacity to consent, or the proposed treatment. First, we explain the regulatory framework for the medical treatment of gender dysphoria in children and adolescents, including the development of the welfare jurisdiction under Section (...)
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  17.  1
    Contemporary Challenges in Children’s Health: Law, Ethics and Policy.Michelle Taylor-Sands & Christopher Gyngell - 2021 - Monash Bioethics Review 39 (Suppl 1):1-3.
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  18. Medical Interventions for Children Born with Variations in Their Sex Characteristics: What’s the Rights Approach?John Tobin - 2021 - Monash Bioethics Review 39 (Suppl 1):67-81.
    There have been growing calls within Australia and beyond to defer medical interventions for children born with variations in their sex characteristics. These calls are increasingly grounded in the claim that such interventions when performed on infants and young children are a violation of their human rights. This paper examines the basis for this claim. It also examines the differences between the principles-based approach to medical ethics which has tended to dominant decisions regarding the treatment of children born with variations (...)
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  19.  1
    Consent for Rapid Genomic Sequencing for Critically Ill Children: Legal and Ethical Issues.Danya Vears, Zornitza Stark, Fiona Lynch & Christopher Gyngell - 2021 - Monash Bioethics Review 39 (Suppl 1):117-129.
    Although rapid genomic sequencing is improving care for critically ill children with rare disease, it also raises important ethical questions that need to be explored as its use becomes more widespread. Two such questions relate to the degree of consent that should be required for RGS to proceed and whether it might ever be appropriate to override parents’ decisions not to allow RGS to be performed in their critically ill child. To explore these questions, we first examine the legal frameworks (...)
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