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  1. Bioethical Implications of End-of-Life Decision-Making in Patients with Dementia: A Tale of Two Societies.Peter P. De Deyn, Arnoldo S. Kraus-Weisman, Latife Salame-Khouri & Jaime D. Mondragón - 2020 - Monash Bioethics Review 38 (1):49-67.
    End-of-life decision-making in patients with dementia is a complex topic. Belgium and the Netherlands have been at the forefront of legislative advancement and progressive societal changes concerning the perspectives toward physician-assisted death. Careful consideration of clinical and social aspects is essential during the end-of-life decision-making process in patients with dementia. Geriatric assent provides the physician, the patient and his family the opportunity to end life with dignity. Unbearable suffering, decisional competence, and awareness of memory deficits are among the clinical considerations (...)
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  2. DBS: A Compelling Example for Ethical and Legal Reflection—a French Perspective on Ethical and Legal Concerns About DBS.Sonia Desmoulin-Canselier - 2020 - Monash Bioethics Review 38 (1):15-34.
    Deep brain stimulation is an approved treatment for neurological diseases and a promising one for psychiatric conditions, which may produce spectacular results very quickly. It is also a powerful tool for brain research and exploration. Beyond an overview of the ethical and legal literature on this topic, this paper aims at showing that DBS is a compelling example for ethical-legal reflection, as it combines a highly technical surgical procedure, a complex active medical device and neuromodulation of the human brain to (...)
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  3. Minds, Brains, and Hearts: An Empirical Study on Pluralism Concerning Death Determination.Vilius Dranseika & Ivars Neiders - 2020 - Monash Bioethics Review 38 (1):35-48.
    Several authors in bioethics literature have expressed the view that a whole brain conception of death is philosophically indefensible. If they are right, what are the alternatives? Some authors have suggested that we should go back to the old cardiopulmonary criterion of death and abandon the so-called Dead Donor Rule. Others argue for a pluralist solution. For example, Robert Veatch has defended a view that competent persons should be free to decide which criterion of death should be used to determine (...)
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  4. Rethinking Health Care Ethics: A Response to Professor Reis-Dennis.Kasia Kozlowska & Stephen Scher - 2020 - Monash Bioethics Review 38 (1):87-90.
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    Resolved and Unresolved Bioethical Authenticity Problems.Jesper Ahlin Marceta - 2020 - Monash Bioethics Review 38 (1):1-14.
    Respect for autonomy is a central moral principle in bioethics. It is sometimes argued that authenticity, i.e., being “real,” “genuine,” “true to oneself,” or similar, is crucial to a person’s autonomy. Patients sometimes make what appears to be inauthentic decisions, such as when anorexia nervosa patients refuse treatment to avoid gaining weight, despite that the risk of harm is very high. If such decisions are inauthentic, and therefore non-autonomous, it may be the case they should be overridden for paternalist reasons. (...)
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  6. Review of Rethinking Health Care Ethics by Stephen Scher and Kasia Kozlowska: Palgrave Macmillan, Available Open Access: Https://Link.Springer.Com/Content/Pdf/10.1007/978-981-13-0830-7.Pdf. [REVIEW]Samuel Reis-Dennis - 2020 - Monash Bioethics Review 38 (1):83-86.
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  7. Review of Altered Inheritance: CRISPR and the Ethics of Human Genome Editing by Françoise Baylis. [REVIEW]Bob Z. Sun - 2020 - Monash Bioethics Review 38 (1):91-93.
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  8. Vulnerability in Human Research.Colin J. H. Thomson & Ian J. Pieper - 2020 - Monash Bioethics Review 38 (1):68-82.
    The conduct of prior ethics review of human research projects helps to protect vulnerable groups or populations from potential negative impacts of research. Contemporary considerations in human research considers the concept of vulnerability in terms of access to research opportunities, impacts on the consenting process, selection bias, and the generalisability of results. Recent work questions the validity of using enumerated lists as a check box approach to protect research participants from exploitation. Through the use of broad categories to treat cohorts (...)
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