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  1.  11
    Human Rights: Principles in Practice Without the Promise of Principles.Brooke A. Ackerly - 2018 - Human Rights Review 19 (3):391-394.
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  2.  8
    Concentration Camps: A Short History by Dan Stone.Antoine Burgard - 2018 - Human Rights Review 19 (3):417-418.
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  3. Peace Agreements by Nina Caspersen.Abhishek Choudhary - 2018 - Human Rights Review 19 (3):411-412.
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  4.  12
    A Global Political Morality: Human Rights, Democracy, and Constitutionalism by Michael J. Perry.Tomás Dodds - 2018 - Human Rights Review 19 (3):415-416.
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  5.  23
    International Human Rights as Essential Safeguard Against the Failures of Nation States.Liliana E. Popa - 2018 - Human Rights Review 19 (3):373-377.
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  6.  12
    Rethinking Dignity.Kristi Giselsson - 2018 - Human Rights Review 19 (3):331-348.
    The concept of dignity is widely debated as to its efficacy as a ground upon which to base respect particularly in relation to human rights. Traditional concepts of inherent dignity associate dignity with the possession of rationality and autonomy, which consequently excludes non-rational humans from being viewed as possessing inherent dignity and therefore equal and inherent worth. This paper offers a theory of inherent dignity based on an account of a common humanity within which all humans might be seen as (...)
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  7.  3
    Liberal Conundrums.Michael Goodhart - 2018 - Human Rights Review 19 (3):385-389.
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  8. Victims’ Stories and the Advancement of Human Rights by Diana Tietjens Meyers.Myra Ann Houser - 2018 - Human Rights Review 19 (3):419-420.
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  9.  6
    Impermanent Apologies: On the Dynamics of Timing and Public Knowledge in Political Apology.Matt James & Jordan Stanger-Ross - 2018 - Human Rights Review 19 (3):289-311.
    Political apologies are commonly imagined as gestures of finality and closure: capstone moments that summate public knowledge. One manifestation of these assumptions is the position that apologies should be timed to come only after appropriate investigation into the wrongdoing has been completed. This article takes a different view, for two reasons. First, even apologies that seem based on robust knowledge can come to seem incomplete or inadequate in the light of subsequent learning and knowledge. Second, because apologies are complexly embedded (...)
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  10.  6
    Impermanent Apologies: On the Dynamics of Timing and Public Knowledge in Political Apology.Matt James & Jordan Stanger-Ross - 2018 - Human Rights Review 19 (3):289-311.
    Political apologies are commonly imagined as gestures of finality and closure: capstone moments that summate public knowledge. One manifestation of these assumptions is the position that apologies should be timed to come only after appropriate investigation into the wrongdoing has been completed. This article takes a different view, for two reasons. First, even apologies that seem based on robust knowledge can come to seem incomplete or inadequate in the light of subsequent learning and knowledge. Second, because apologies are complexly embedded (...)
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  11. Law In and As Culture: Intellectual Property, Minority Rights and the Rights of Indigenous Peoples by Caroline Joan “Kay” S. Picart.Kerri J. Malloy - 2018 - Human Rights Review 19 (3):413-414.
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  12.  3
    Summary: Why Constitutional Democracy Requires International Human Rights Law.Jamie Mayerfeld - 2018 - Human Rights Review 19 (3):369-371.
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  13.  5
    Reply: Upholding Human Rights Is Our Shared Responsibility.Jamie Mayerfeld - 2018 - Human Rights Review 19 (3):405-410.
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  14.  6
    Unpacking the Relationship Between Sovereignty, Democracy, and Human Rights.Brad R. Roth - 2018 - Human Rights Review 19 (3):399-403.
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  15.  7
    Redesigning the Definition a Truth Commission, but Also Designing a Forward-Looking Non-Prescriptive Definition to Make Them Potentially More Successful.Jeremy Sarkin - 2018 - Human Rights Review 19 (3):349-368.
    This article argues that two new definitions are needed for what constitutes a truth commission. The first new definition that is needed is a different backward-looking definition that is used reflectively to contrast, compare and research past and present truth commissions. It is argued that the variety of definitions that exist about what constitutes a Truth Commission have a number of problems, and that a better definition is needed to categorise past mechanisms, make comparisons and improve comparative research. The second (...)
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  16.  2
    What If Neoliberalism Captures the Human Rights Establishment? Sustainable Development Goal 4 and the Global Education Reform Movement.Nicholas Tampio - 2018 - Human Rights Review 19 (3):379-383.
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  17.  3
    Can Microfinance Work? How to Improve Its Ethical Balance and Effectiveness by Lesley Sherrat.Richard F. Works - 2018 - Human Rights Review 19 (3):421-423.
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  18.  7
    The Promise is in the Practice.Karen Zivi - 2018 - Human Rights Review 19 (3):395-398.
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  19.  10
    A Difficult Legacy: Human Dignity as the Founding Value of Human Rights.Paweł Łuków - 2018 - Human Rights Review 19 (3):313-329.
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  20.  2
    Human Rights Reporting: Rights, Responsibilities, and Challenges.George Andreopoulos - 2018 - Human Rights Review 19 (2):147-166.
    This essay critically examines the intersections between news media and human rights in the context of the existing human rights framework. A survey of the fundamental provisions of international human rights law and of the evolving case law of human rights organs relating to media freedom and responsibilities reveals that existing gaps and underspecified obligations render problematic the normative guidance offered by the framework in addressing the pertinent human rights issues. However, this is part of the story. The problems associated (...)
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  21.  4
    Killings in Context: An Analysis of the News Framing of Femicide.Camelia Bouzerdan & Jenifer Whitten-Woodring - 2018 - Human Rights Review 19 (2):211-228.
    While attacks against members of the LGBT community are increasingly covered as hate crimes and are widely viewed as a form of repression, attacks on women are almost never covered as violations of human rights. We propose that until violence against women is recognized as a form of repression and a threat to the physical security of women, we cannot expect much to be done to prevent it. We posit that policies aimed at preventing violence against women are unlikely to (...)
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  22.  2
    National Contexts of International Human Rights.Alexandre Boza - 2018 - Human Rights Review 19 (2):273-276.
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  23.  2
    Media Coverage of Human Rights in the USA and UK: The Violations Still Will Not Be Televised.Shawna M. Brandle - 2018 - Human Rights Review 19 (2):167-191.
    This article analyzes American television and American and British print news coverage of human rights using a combination of manual and machine coding. The data reveal that television and print news cover very few human rights stories, that these stories are mostly international and not domestic, that even when human rights are covered, they are not covered in detail, and that human rights issues are more likely to be covered when they are not framed as human rights. This suggests that (...)
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  24.  1
    Introduction. Human Rights and the Media.Shawna Brandle & George Andreopoulos - 2018 - Human Rights Review 19 (2):143-146.
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  25. Man or Monster? The Trial of a Khmer Rouge Torturer by Alexander Laban Hinton.JoAnn DiGeorgio-Lutz - 2018 - Human Rights Review 19 (2):285-286.
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  26.  1
    Reporting Without Knowledge: The Absence of Human Rights in US Journalism Education.Janet E. Reilly - 2018 - Human Rights Review 19 (2):249-271.
    Journalists play an important role in the realization and protection of human rights worldwide, framing and shaping the public’s understanding of issues. In the United States, however, studies show that media coverage of human rights is inadequate and frequently inaccurate, with US journalists typically framing human rights as an exclusively international issue. This study helps to explain why this is the case through an examination of the human rights content of journalism education in the United States. Journalism education is dominated (...)
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  27. Remediation in Rwanda: Grassroots Legal Forums by Kristin Conner Doughty.Lyn S. Graybill - 2018 - Human Rights Review 19 (2):277-278.
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  28.  2
    The Implementation of the Findings of the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights by Rachel Murray and Debra Long.Niklas Hultin - 2018 - Human Rights Review 19 (2):287-288.
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  29.  8
    US Media and Post-9/11 Human Rights Violations in the Name of Counterterrorism.Brigitte L. Nacos & Yaeli Bloch-Elkon - 2018 - Human Rights Review 19 (2):193-210.
    This article adds to earlier research revealing that the American news media did not discharge their responsibility as a watchdog press in the post-9/11 years by failing to scrutinize extreme and unlawful government policies and actions, most of all the decision to invade Iraq based on false information about Saddam Hussein’s alleged weapons of mass destruction arsenal. The content analyses presented here demonstrate that leading US news organizations, both television and print, did not expressly refer to human rights violations when (...)
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  30.  3
    Nationwide Newspaper Coverage of Rape and Rape Culture on College Campuses: Testing Community Structure Theory.John C. Pollock, Brielle Richardella, Amanda Jahr, Melissa Morgan & Judi Puritz Cook - 2018 - Human Rights Review 19 (2):229-248.
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  31.  3
    Genocide: The Act as Idea by Berel Lang.William R. Pruitt - 2018 - Human Rights Review 19 (2):279-280.
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  32.  1
    To Live Freely in This World: Sex Worker Activism in Africa by Chi Adanna Mgbako.Ankur Yadav - 2018 - Human Rights Review 19 (2):281-283.
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  33.  1
    Obama ’s Guantánamo: Stories From an Enduring Prison by Jonathan Hafetz, Ed.Peter Admirand - 2018 - Human Rights Review 19 (1):131-133.
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  34.  26
    Are Human Rights Moralistic?Guy Aitchison - 2018 - Human Rights Review 19 (1):23-43.
    In this paper, I engage with the radical critique of human rights moralism. Radical critics argue that: human rights are myopic ; human rights are demobilising ; human rights are paternalistic ; and human rights are monopolistic. I argue that critics offer important insights into the limits of human rights as a language of social justice. However, critics err insofar as they imply that human rights are irredeemably corrupted and they under-estimate the subversive potential of the moral ideas that underpin (...)
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  35.  4
    Principle Versus Profit: Debating Human Rights Sanctions.Stephanie Chan - 2018 - Human Rights Review 19 (1):45-71.
    Economic sanctions are a primary tool the US government and international organizations use to promote human rights abroad, yet they have proven to be largely ineffective and harmful to civilians. There is accumulating evidence that this paradox may be explained by the expressive purposes of sanctions and domestic politics. This article further explores these explanations by examining human rights sanction policy debates. Specifically, I analyzed 27 US Congressional hearings on human rights policy toward China. I argue that moral pressure enabled (...)
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  36.  5
    Seeing the Myth in Human Rights by Jenna Reinbold.Michael O. Johnston - 2018 - Human Rights Review 19 (1):129-130.
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  37.  8
    The Global-Local Tension of LGBT Rights.Danielle MacCartney - 2018 - Human Rights Review 19 (1):121-126.
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  38.  8
    The Economic Accomplices to the Argentine Dictatorship: Outstanding Debts by Horacio Verbitsky and Juan Pablo Bohoslavsky, Eds.Grigoris Markou - 2018 - Human Rights Review 19 (1):127-128.
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  39.  12
    Crimes Unspoken: The Rape of German Women at the End of the Second World War by Miriam Gebhardt.Abraham J. Peck - 2018 - Human Rights Review 19 (1):135-137.
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  40.  5
    After Marriage Equality: The Future of LGBT Rights by Carlos A. Ball, Ed.Senthorun Raj - 2018 - Human Rights Review 19 (1):139-141.
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  41.  4
    Does US Foreign Aid Undermine Human Rights? The “Thaksinification” of the War on Terror Discourses and the Human Rights Crisis in Thailand, 2001 to 2006.Salvador Santino Fulo Regilme - 2018 - Human Rights Review 19 (1):73-95.
    What is the relationship between Thailand’s human rights crisis during Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra’s leadership and the USA-led post-9/11 war on terror? Why did the human rights situation dramatically deteriorate after the Thaksin regime publicly supported the Bush administration’s war on terror and consequently received US counterterror assistance? This article offers two conceptual arguments that jointly demonstrate a constitutive theoretical explanation, which shows that counterterror and militaristic transnational and national discursive structures enabled the strategy of state repression in Thailand under (...)
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  42.  15
    Contesting Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity at the UN Human Rights Council.M. Joel Voss - 2018 - Human Rights Review 19 (1):1-22.
    Norm entrepreneurs have made significant strides in advancing sexual orientation and gender identity resolutions at the UN Human Rights Council. However, these advancements are being fiercely contested. This paper examines the development of SOGI at the Council including how states advocate for and contest SOGI and the extent to which their positions are mutable. Resolution 32/2 of 2016, which created an independent expert, is the central focus of the paper. Participant interviews and content analysis of documents and statements are used (...)
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  43.  2
    Locking In Human Rights in Africa: Analyzing State Accession to the African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights.Simon Zschirnt - 2018 - Human Rights Review 19 (1):97-119.
    The establishment of the African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights was a pivotal moment for the African human rights system. To date, 30 of the African Union’s 55 member states have accepted the Court’s jurisdiction by ratifying the Protocol to the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights on the Establishment of an African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights. This article uses statistical analysis of state action on the Protocol to shed light upon the factors that have led (...)
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