Human Rights Review

ISSN: 1524-8879

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  1.  29
    The Resurgence of Enforced Disappearances in the Aftermath of the July 15, 2016 Failed Coup Attempt in Turkey: A Systematic Analysis of Human Rights Violations. [REVIEW]Köksal Avincan - 2024 - Human Rights Review 25 (1):67-98.
    After the failed coup attempt on July 15, 2016, Turkey rapidly adjusted its national security strategies to align with the principles of a security state, resulting in a notable increase in human rights violations during the declared State of Emergency. Enforced disappearances, previously used by the State against Kurdish dissidents in the 1990s, resurfaced as a brutal method in the name of “State survival” following the failed coup attempt. This research examined the systematic and organized nature of these enforced disappearances, (...)
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  2.  21
    The Principle of a Trial Within a Reasonable Time and JustTech: Benefits and Risks.Daniel Brantes Ferreira, Elizaveta Gromova & Elena V. Titova - 2024 - Human Rights Review 25 (1):47-66.
    The article addresses the pervasive global challenge of delayed justice, emphasizing its role as a catalyst for widespread judicial reforms. The study defines international and national court approaches to reasonable trial durations by employing systematic and comparative legal methods. It delves into essential technology courts and parties use to ensure timely proceedings, categorizing associated risks and problems. The authors advocate for the multi-door courthouse system, illustrating its efficacy in reducing delays. Furthermore, the article classifies technologies facilitating reasonable trial durations, acknowledging (...)
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  3.  33
    Academic Bullying and Human Rights: Is It Time to Take Them Seriously?Dora Kostakopoulou & Morteza Mahmoudi - 2024 - Human Rights Review 25 (1):25-46.
    Notwithstanding universities’ many laudable aims, incidents of serious bullying, academic harassment and sexual harassment in academic settings are reported with increasing regularity globally. However, the human rights violations involved in bullying and academic harassment have not received attention by the literature. In this article, we pierce the veil of silence surrounding university environments and provide a systematic account of the breaches of international and European human rights law involved in academic bullying and harassment. By adopting a socio-legal lens, we shed (...)
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  4.  20
    Human Rights Violations Committed Against Human Rights Defenders Through the Use of Legal System: A Trend in Europe and Beyond.Aikaterini-Christina Koula - 2024 - Human Rights Review 25 (1):99-122.
    Human rights defenders (HRDs) fight for various human rights and address concerns related to corruption, employment, the environment, and other issues. They also challenge powerful state and private stakeholders and seek justice for human rights abuses. Therefore, HRDs are increasingly becoming targets of violent attacks and abuse with the aim of silencing them. This article begins by providing a brief definition of HRDs and then proceeds to outline the risks associated with their work in defending human rights. It also identifies (...)
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  5.  29
    The Efficiency of Intersectionality: Labelling the Benefits of a Rights-Based Approach to Interpret Sexual and Gender-Based Crimes.Ana Martin - 2024 - Human Rights Review 25 (1):1-24.
    International criminal law (ICL) has traditionally overlooked sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) and struggles to understand it. Prosecutions have been largely inefficient and not reflective of gender harms. The Rome Statute requires interpreting SGBV as a social construction (article 7(3)), in consistency with international human rights law (IHRL) and without discrimination (article 21(3)). There is, however, little guidance to implement these approaches. This article argues that intersectionality, an IHRL-based approach that reveals compounded discrimination, is an efficient tool to interpret SGBV (...)
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  6.  29
    Islam, Constitutional Law and Human Rights. Sexual Minorities and Freethinkers in Egypt and Tunisia, by Tommaso Virgili.Jaume Saura - 2024 - Human Rights Review 25 (1):127-129.
  7.  25
    The Significance of Sami Rights: Law, Justice, and Sustainability for the Indigenous Sami in the Nordic Countries by Dorothee Cambou and Oyvind Ravna, eds.Lavinia Stan - 2024 - Human Rights Review 25 (1):123-125.
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