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  1.  3
    ‘It’s Not About the Money—Stop the Trauma’: Victims’ Responses to Reparations in Argentina and Australia.Keziah Colsell & Olivera Simić - 2022 - Human Rights Review 23 (2):163-181.
    In this paper, we compare reparation policies in Australia and Argentina. We analyse the difference between the reparations given by their respective governments to the Argentinian victims of the ‘Dirty War’ and to the ‘Stolen Generations’ in Australia. The aim of this paper is to compare the experience of victims in Argentina and Australia in relation to reparations to demonstrate that using only one type of reparations, either material or symbolic, is unsatisfactory for victims and does not repair the harm (...)
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  2.  5
    Non-Muslims in the Qanun Jinayat and the Choice of Law in Sharia Courts in Aceh.Abdul Halim - 2022 - Human Rights Review 23 (2):265-288.
    The Aceh Jinayat Qanun, which is often considered violating Human Rights, has become the choice of the non-Muslim minorities as their rational choice. This study aims to analyze non-Muslims’ choice of The Aceh Jinayat Qanun implemented by the Sharia Court in Aceh and its underlying motives. This study relies on field research involving observations, in-depth interviews with Sharia Court judges, Head of the Islamic Sharia Service, Acehnese clerical figures, and Non-Muslims involved in criminal cases handled by the Sharia Courts. This (...)
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  3.  2
    Differences in African Indigenous Rights Messaging in International Advocacy Coalitions.Maia Hallward & Jonathan Taylor Downs - 2022 - Human Rights Review 23 (2):183-204.
    International Indigenous rights coalitions increasingly involve Indigenous and non-Indigenous civil society organizations with diverse backgrounds and interests. As these organizations more frequently interact and partner with one another, what issues are being emphasized in their advocacy efforts? This study utilizes content analysis of 60 Indigenous rights organizations’ websites, as well as interviews of several leaders and staff, to explore whether African Indigenous organizations emphasize different aspects of Indigenous rights in their messaging and advocacy than their other Indigenous and non-Indigenous coalition (...)
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  4.  3
    Man to Man, Gal to Gal…dat Wrong: an Analysis of How Sexual Prejudice Is Reflected in Jamaican Popular Music.Mahalia Jackman - 2022 - Human Rights Review 23 (2):221-239.
    This research analyses sexual prejudice in sixteen dancehall and reggae songs—two musical genres indigenous to Jamaica. The analysis provides us with insights on the lenses through which some Jamaicans view same-sex relationships and how sexual prejudice is normalised and justified. In this sample of songs, homosexuality is presented as a violation of gendered norms, sinful, unnatural, a threat to society and a foreign lifestyle. The presentation of homosexuality as a foreign lifestyle suggests that antigay prejudice could be related to fears (...)
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  5.  4
    Marginalized and Misunderstood: How Anti-Rohingya Language Policies Fuel Genocide.Lindsey N. Kingston & Aroline E. Seibert Hanson - 2022 - Human Rights Review 23 (2):289-303.
    Language plays a role in the genocide of the Rohingya people in Myanmar and continues to shape their experiences in displacement, yet their linguistic rights are rarely discussed in relation to their human rights and humanitarian concerns. International human rights standards offer important foundations for conceptualizing the “right to language” and identifying how linguistic rights can be violated both in situ and in displacement. The Rohingya case highlights how language policies are weaponized to oppress unwanted minorities; their outsider status is (...)
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  6.  2
    Taiwan’s Road to an Asylum Law: Who, When, How, and Why Not Yet?Kristina Kironska - 2022 - Human Rights Review 23 (2):241-264.
    Taiwan is considered to be one of the most progressive countries in Asia but has no asylum law. Does it need one? Many in Taiwan, including officials and politicians, claim that the regulations that are currently in place are sufficient. There are, however, some people in Taiwan who require protection, and the government is not able to respond effectively in the absence of an asylum law. The author has identified several different groups in Taiwan that would benefit from an asylum (...)
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  7.  4
    The Will and the Way: How State Capacity and Willingness Jointly Affect Human Rights Improvement.Alejandro Anaya-Muñoz & Amanda Murdie - 2022 - Human Rights Review 23 (1):127-154.
    When should we expect compliance with international human rights norms? Previous literature on the causal mechanisms underlying compliance have focused independently on the roles of state willingness, thought of as the preferences of the regime leadership, and on state capacity, in improving human rights practices within a state. We build an argument that neither of these factors are sufficient on their own to improve compliance with human rights norms. Instead, improved human rights practices require both “the will and the way.” (...)
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  8.  2
    Correction to: Conceptualizing Corporate Accountability in International Law: Models for a Business and Human Rights Treaty.Nadia Bernaz - 2022 - Human Rights Review 23 (1):101-101.
  9.  4
    Doing Justice to History Confronting the Past in International Criminal Courts by Barrie Sander: Oxford: Oxford University Press.Roger S. Clark - 2022 - Human Rights Review 23 (1):155-157.
  10.  1
    Romani Communities and Transformative Change; A New Social Europe.Cristina-Ioana Dragomir, Andrew Ryder, Marius Taba & Nidhi Trehan - 2022 - Human Rights Review 23 (1):159-161.
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  11.  6
    When Rights Enter the CSR Field: British Firms’ Engagement with Human Rights and the UN Guiding Principles.Alvise Favotto & Kelly Kollman - 2022 - Human Rights Review 23 (1):21-40.
    The adoption of the Guiding Principles for Business and Human Rights by the United Nations in 2011 created a new governance instrument aimed at improving the promotion of human rights by business enterprises. While reaffirming states duties to uphold human rights in law, the UNGPs called on firms to promote the realization of human rights within global markets. The UNGPs thus have sought to embed human rights more firmly within the field of corporate social responsibility and to use CSR practices (...)
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  12.  2
    Correction to: Beyond Due Diligence: the Human Rights Corporation.Benjamin Gregg - 2022 - Human Rights Review 23 (1):19-19.
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  13.  5
    The Struggle for Legitimacy in Business and Human Rights Regulation—a Consideration of the Processes Leading to the UN Guiding Principles and an International Treaty.Brigitte Hamm - 2022 - Human Rights Review 23 (1):103-125.
    After the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights were adopted in 2011, an international treaty has been being negotiated since 2014. The two instruments reveal similarities and also conflicts regarding the adequate organization of the global economy based on human rights. The focus in this article will be on the processes leading to these instruments, because they themselves mirror different understandings of governance in the field of business and human rights as well as the struggle over the power (...)
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  14.  5
    National Action Plans on Business and Human Rights: an Experimentalist Governance Analysis.Claire Methven O’Brien, John Ferguson & Marisa McVey - 2022 - Human Rights Review 23 (1):71-99.
    National Action Plans on business and human rights are a growing phenomenon. Since 2011, 42 such plans have been adopted or are in-development worldwide. By comparison, only 39 general human rights action plans were published between 1993 and 2021. In parallel, NAPs have attracted growing scholarly interest. While some studies highlight their potential to advance national compliance with international norms, others criticise NAPs as cosmetic devices that states use to deflect attention from persisting abuses and needed regulation. In response to (...)
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  15.  2
    Correction to: Putting the French Duty of Vigilance Law in Context: Towards Corporate Accountability for Human Rights Violations in the Global South?Almut Schilling-Vacaflor - 2022 - Human Rights Review 23 (1):41-41.
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  16.  3
    Correction to: The Unrealized Potential of National Human Rights Institutions in Business and Human Rights Regulation: Conditions for Effective Engagement and Proposal for Reform.René Wolfsteller - 2022 - Human Rights Review 23 (1):69-69.
    Since the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights were adopted by the UN Human Rights Council in 2011, they have diffused into policy frameworks, laws, and regulations across the globe. This special issue seeks to advance the interdisciplinary field of human rights research by examining key elements of the emerging transnational regime for the regulation of business and human rights. In seven original contributions, scholars from political science, law, accounting, and philosophy critically reflect on the theoretical foundations of (...)
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  17.  6
    The Unrealized Potential of National Human Rights Institutions in Business and Human Rights Regulation: Conditions for Effective Engagement and Proposal for Reform.René Wolfsteller - 2022 - Human Rights Review 23 (1):43-68.
    While National Human Rights Institutions are widely regarded as particularly promising tools in the emerging transnational regime for the regulation of business and human rights, we still know little about their potential and actual contribution to this field. This article bridges the gap between business and human rights research and NHRI scholarship, proceeding in three steps: Firstly, I analyze the structural conditions for NHRIs to tackle business-related human rights abuses effectively, focusing on the key conditions of legitimacy and competences. Secondly, (...)
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  18.  6
    Business and Human Rights Regulation After the UN Guiding Principles: Accountability, Governance, Effectiveness.René Wolfsteller & Yingru Li - 2022 - Human Rights Review 23 (1):1-17.
    Since the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights were adopted by the UN Human Rights Council in 2011, they have diffused into policy frameworks, laws, and regulations across the globe. This special issue seeks to advance the interdisciplinary field of human rights research by examining key elements of the emerging transnational regime for the regulation of business and human rights. In seven original contributions, scholars from political science, law, accounting, and philosophy critically reflect on the theoretical foundations of (...)
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