Year:

  1.  84
    Meaning and More Meaningful. A Modest Measure.Peter Baumann - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy of Life 5 (3):33-49.
    We often describe lives (or parts of lives) as meaningful or as not meaningful. It is also common to characterize them as more or less meaningful. Some lives, we tend to think, are more meaningful than others. But how then can one compare lives with respect to how much meaning they contain? Can one? This paper argues that (i) only a notion of rough equality can be used when comparing different lives with respect to their meaning, and that (ii) the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  2.  22
    Meaning Without Ego.Christopher Ketcham - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy of Life 5 (3):112-133.
    Thaddeus Metz in Meaning in Life centers his research within western philosophical thought. I will engage early Buddhism to see whether its thinking about meaning is compatible with Metz’s fundamentality theory of what makes life meaningful. My thesis is: Early Buddhist thinking generally supports a fundamentality reading of meaning but in the ethical state of nibbāna (nirvana) the Arahant (enlightened one) is in a state that has access to the pure potentiality for meaning.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  47
    Fundamentality and Extradimensional Final Value.David Matheson - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy of Life 5 (3):19-32.
    I argue that life’s meaning is not only a distinct, gradational final value of individual lives, but also an “extradimensional” final value: the realization of meaning in life brings final value along an additional evaluative dimension, much as the realization of depth in solids or width in plane geometric figures brings magnitude along an additional spatial dimension. I go on to consider the extent to which Metz’s (2013) fundamentality theory respects the principle that life’s meaning is an extradimensional final value, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  81
    Assessing Lives, Giving Supernaturalism Its Due, and Capturing Naturalism: Reply to 13 Critics of Meaning in Life.Thaddeus Metz - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy of Life 5 (3):228-278.
    A lengthy reply to several critical discussions of _Meaning in Life: An Analytic Study_ appearing in the _Journal of Philosophy of Life_. The contributors are from a variety of philosophical traditions, including the Anglo-American, Continental and East Asian (especially Buddhist and Japanese) ones.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  82
    Précis of Meaning in Life: An Analytic Study.Thaddeus Metz - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy of Life 5 (3):ii-vi.
    Brief summary of _Meaning in Life: An Analytic Study_ and of how contributors to a special issue of the _Journal of Philosophy of Life_ question it.
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Is Meaning in Life Comparable?: From the Viewpoint of ‘The Heart of Meaning in Life’.Masahiro Morioka - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy of Life 5 (3):50-65.
    The aim of this paper is to propose a new approach to the question of meaning in life by criticizing Thaddeus Metz’s objectivist theory in his book Meaning in Life: An Analytic Study. I propose the concept of “the heart of meaning in life,” which alone can answer the question, “Alas, does my life like this have any meaning at all?” and I demonstrate that “the heart of meaning in life” cannot be compared, in principle, with other people’s meaning in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  29
    Defending the Purpose Theory of Meaning in Life.Jason Poettcker - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy of Life 5 (3):180-207.
    In Meaning in Life (2013, Oxford University Press), Thaddeus Metz presents a robust and innovative naturalistic account of what makes an individual’s life objectively meaningful. Metz discusses six existing arguments for purpose theory of meaning in life and offers objections to each of these arguments. Purpose theory is “the view that one’s life is meaningful just insofar as one fulfills a purpose that God has assigned to one” (Metz, 2013a, p. 80). Metz also proposes a novel argument to undermine purpose (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  45
    Metz’s Quest for the Holy Grail.James Tartaglia - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy of Life 5 (3):90-111.
    This paper is a critique of the new paradigm in analytic philosophy for investigating the meaning of life, focusing on Meaning in Life as the definitive example. Metz relies upon intuition, and reflection upon recent analytic literature, to guide him to his ‘fundamentality theory’. He calls this a theory of ‘the meaning of life’, saying it may be ‘the holy grail’. I argue that Metz’s project is not addressed to the meaning of life, but a distinct issue about social meaning; (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  24
    A Psychological Model to Determine Meaning in Life and Meaning of Life.Yu Urata - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy of Life 5 (3):215-227.
    Thaddeus Metz’s Meaning in Life (2013) offers considerable insights into previous philosophical theories and psychological research. It inspired aspects of this study, which presents a psychological model for the meaning of life that is grounded in a investigation of philosophical theory and psychological research. In this paper, I introduce three models: Model I (Framework), Model II (Elements), and Model III (Composition). Model I was a theoretical framework model based on philosophical, anthropological, and psychological theories. Model II was constructed using categorized (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  51
    Source and Bearer: Metz on the Pure Part-Life View of Meaning.Hasko von Kriegstein - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy of Life 5 (3):1-18.
    According to the pure part-life view the meaning in our lives is always borne by particular parts of our lives. The aim of this paper is to show that Thaddeus Metz’s rejection of this view is too quick. Given that meaning is a value that often depends on relational rather than intrinsic properties a pure part-life view can accommodate many of the intuitions that move Metz towards a mixed view. According to this mixed view some meaning is borne by parts (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  42
    Metz’ Incoherence Objection: Some Epistemological Considerations.Nicholas Waghorn - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy of Life 5 (3):150-168.
    In his Meaning in Life, Thaddeus Metz puts a certain argument – the ‘incoherence objection’ – to a number of different uses. The incoherence objection states that attempts to establish knowledge of the truth of certain conditionals will, in conjunction with some uncontroversial knowledge claims, commit us to decidedly controversial ones. Given that we do not wish to be so committed, it follows that we cannot claim to know the truth of those conditionals. This article seeks to examine some of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  36
    Meaning in Consequences.Mark Wells - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy of Life 5 (3):169-179.
    This paper aims to respond on behalf of consequentialist theories of meaning in life to criticisms raised by Thaddeus Metz and, in doing so, demonstrates how the debate over theories of meaning in life might make progress. By using conceptual resources developed for consequentialist theories of morality, I argue that Metz’s general arguments against consequentialist theories of meaning in life fail. That is, some consequentialist theories can accommodate Metz’s criticisms. However, using conceptual resources developed in debate concerning consequentialist theories of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  26
    Agreement and Sympathy: On Metz’s Meaning in Life.Sho Yamaguchi - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy of Life 5 (3): 66-89.
    In this paper I argue that we can appreciate the real worth of Thaddeus Metz’s recent book Meaning in Life just by regarding it as the product of his existential struggle in our endless quest for life’s meaning. In other words, we could not understand in what respect Metz’s work is valuable if we read it from the purely analytical-theoretical perspective. My paper is, therefore, meant to challenge the idea of ‘analytic study on meaningfulness’. My general suggestion is that the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  28
    Death and the Meaning of Life: A Critical Study of Metz’s Meaning in Life.Fumitake Yoshizawa - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy of Life 5 (3):134-149.
    In Meaning in Life: An Analytic Study, Thaddeus Metz advocates a kind of naturalistic objective theory of meaning in life, through a rejection of supernaturalism. In this paper, I examine Metz’s argument on supernaturalism, in particular, soul-centered theory and immortality. I will argue that his objection to supernaturalism is inadequate because he does not treat properly a familiar idea about the relationship between death and meaning, namely, the idea that a person’s death itself makes her life meaningless. Metz interprets immortality (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Does Death Give Meaning to Life?Brooke Alan Trisel - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy of Life 5 (2):62-81.
    Some people claim that death makes our lives meaningless. Bernard Williams and Viktor Frankl have made the opposite claim that death gives meaning to life. Although there has been much scrutiny of the former claim, the latter claim has received very little attention. In this paper, I will explore whether and how death gives meaning to our lives. As I will argue, there is not sufficient support for the strong claim that death is necessary for one's life to be meaningful. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  18
    True Detective : Pessimism, Buddhism or Philosophy?Finn Janning - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy of Life 5 (1).
    The aim of this essay is two-sided. The first is to illustrate to what extent philosophy can contribute to our everyday living. The second is to illustrate how. The implicit thesis that I try to unfold in this experimental essay is that these two sides—what and how—constantly intermingle. Although the philosophical approach takes its inspiration from the French philosophers Gilles Deleuze and Michel Serres, as well as from modern secular mindfulness, the main consideration in any philosophy that contributes to our (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  49
    Philosophy for Everyday Life.Finn Janning - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy of Life 5 (1):1-18.
    The aim of this essay is two-sided. The first is to illustrate to what extent philosophy can contribute to our everyday living. The second is to illustrate how. The implicit thesis that I try to unfold in this experimental essay is that these two sides—what and how—constantly intermingle. Although the philosophical approach takes its inspiration from the French philosophers Gilles Deleuze and Michel Serres, as well as from modern secular mindfulness, the main consideration in any philosophy that contributes to our (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. Feminism, Disability, and Brain Death :Alternative Voices From Japanese Bioethics.Masahiro Morioka - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy of Life 5 (1):19-41.
    Japanese bioethics has created a variety of important ideas that have not yet been reflected on mainstream bioethics discourses in the English-speaking world, which include “the swaying of the confused self” in the field of feminism, “inner eugenic thought” concerning disability, and “human relationship-oriented approaches to brain death.” In this paper, I will examine them more closely, and consider what bioethics in Japan can contribute to the development of an international discussion on philosophy of life.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues