Common Knowledge

ISSN: 0961-754X

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  1.  4
    Two Cheers for Politics: Why Democracy Is Flawed, Frightening—and Our Best Hope.Paul Cartledge - 2024 - Common Knowledge 30 (1):137-139.
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  2.  4
    When God Stops Fighting: How Religious Violence Ends.William T. Cavanaugh - 2024 - Common Knowledge 30 (1):136-137.
    Juergensmeyer's interviews of ex-fighters—Muslims in Iraq and Mindanao, Sikhs in Punjab—illustrate how stubbornly they refuse to conform to Western narratives about “religious violence.” Among the Sikhs, “almost none of the militants surveyed... were said to be noticeably religious”; in ISIS, “many in the movement were attracted not by the ideology or the ideals, but by the excitement of being involved in an alternative culture, one of largely male militancy.” For the Moros in Mindanao, likewise, Islamic theology is one factor among (...)
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  3.  2
    Playing with Fire: The Story of Maria Yudina, Pianist in Stalin's Russia.Caryl Emerson - 2024 - Common Knowledge 30 (1):140-143.
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  4.  5
    Home in the World: A Memoir.Leela Gandhi - 2024 - Common Knowledge 30 (1):143-144.
    Amartya Sen's teeming account of an ecumenical life lived across three continents and over nine decades, in the interstices of colonial encounter, takes the reader on an intimate journey through some of the most significant global, intellectual, and historical events of the second half of the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. We learn of Sen's formative years at Rabindranath Tagore's Shantiniketan University (he was named by the sage himself), and of the lasting impact of the Bengal Famine of 1943 on (...)
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  5.  3
    Bynum, Gender, and the Western Christian Middle Ages.Anna Harrison - 2024 - Common Knowledge 30 (1):23-39.
    As a contribution to the Common Knowledge symposium “Caroline Walker Bynum across the Disciplines,” this article argues that Bynum's work on gender has overturned bedrock interpretations of the religious significance of the widespread ascetic practices of the Western Christian Middle Ages. Bynum's claim has been that medieval asceticism is best understood not as an upshot of dualism — of the soul and body understood as in opposition — but as “an effort to plumb and realize all the possibilities of the (...)
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  6.  5
    Comparing Carefully.John Stratton Hawley - 2024 - Common Knowledge 30 (1):40-61.
    A contribution to the Common Knowledge symposium “Caroline Walker Bynum across the Disciplines,” this essay explores the side of Bynum's scholarly personality that may be regarded as comparativist. She is interested in comparison with regard to periods of time, with regard to ritual and gender-based religious practices in the Christian West, and with respect to similarities that might be claimed between elements of Christian and non-Christian cultures. Her thoughts about morphology, materiality, and gender extend beyond medieval Europe to the world (...)
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  7.  4
    Bynum across the Generations.Tamar Herzig & Omer Elmakais - 2024 - Common Knowledge 30 (1):124-132.
    In this afterword to the Common Knowledge symposium “Caroline Walker Bynum across the Disciplines,” Bynum's early work is seen to have revolutionized the fields of medieval studies and religious studies by disclosing the need to account for the embodied and gendered aspects of Christian spirituality. It reflects on the enduring influence of her book Holy Feast and Holy Fast on the study of premodern mysticism, sanctity, and witchcraft, then discusses the impact of Bynum's later works on the reception of Holy (...)
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  8.  6
    Caroline Bynum and Medieval Art History in America.Jacqueline E. Jung - 2024 - Common Knowledge 30 (1):76-123.
    As a contribution to the Common Knowledge symposium “Caroline Walker Bynum across the Disciplines,” this essay stresses Bynum's commitment to the methods and questions of history but also the unparalleled impact of her work on adjacent fields, including and perhaps even especially art history. Furthermore, her body of scholarship registers a consistent engagement with art historians. Weaving together personal memoir and historiography, this article sketches the manifold ways in which Bynum's publications have responded to and shaped the contours of medieval (...)
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  9.  3
    Introduction: On Her Own Terms.Richard Kieckhefer - 2024 - Common Knowledge 30 (1):18-22.
    Caroline Walker Bynum's work illustrates how a historian engages in conversation about matters of interest to historical subjects, matters of interest within the academy, and matters of concern to the general public. The key methodological paradox is how she respects the past for its otherness and strangeness, yet her books are always relevant to the present. Holy Feast and Holy Fast deals with the function of eating and fasting in ways that have had resonance for discussion of anorexia, but her (...)
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  10.  3
    From Matter to Material Culture.Maureen C. Miller - 2024 - Common Knowledge 30 (1):62-75.
    As a contribution to the Common Knowledge symposium “Caroline Walker Bynum across the Disciplines,” this essay traces the origins and development of Bynum's interest in the material artifacts of late medieval Christian spirituality. The author narrates these evolutions through analyses of a single object, the Louvain beguine cradle from the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The essay begins by treating Bynum's research from the 1980s to the early 1990s as moving toward a “visual theology” and then charts her (...)
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  11.  20
    Ian Hacking (1936–2023).Cheryl Misak - 2024 - Common Knowledge 30 (1):1-6.
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  12.  1
    “On a Knife's Edge” and Other Poems.Yuliya Musakovska & Olena Jennings and the Author - 2024 - Common Knowledge 30 (1):7-11.
    The Choicebetween writing and livingchoosing the latteris simply naturalthough you don't always havea choice—so said the womanchosen by the formerif the second is more naturalwhy do I keep being thrown to the shorefrom the water whereI am a fishon the landI am catching my breathwith respiration inspirationwriting with my tail on the sanduntil I'm washed up into livingby the waveagainyou do have a choicebut you always make the wrong one2018The Serpent of SilenceFriday evening. There's nothing left to talk about.A silver-headed (...)
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  13.  3
    Eight Poems.Ekhmetjan Osman & Joshua L. Freeman - 2024 - Common Knowledge 30 (1):12-17.
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  14.  5
    The Living Death of Antiquity: Neoclassical Aesthetics.Jeffrey M. Perl - 2024 - Common Knowledge 30 (1):134-136.
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  15.  5
    Knowledge Lost: A New View of Early Modern Intellectual History.Bill Sherman - 2024 - Common Knowledge 30 (1):133-134.
    The first book for which I had title-envy was Peter Laslett's The World We Have Lost (1965). At once mysterious and memorable, the phrase on the cover promised (at least to my undergraduate eyes) a kind of history that was shadowy and unfamiliar. Thanks to the success of the social history it launched, the work now looks surprisingly straightforward: its facts and figures documenting premodern English society—its class structures, marriage practices, literacy rates, and so on—make the past feel found. So (...)
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  16.  5
    All Future Plunges to the Past: James Joyce in Russian Literature.Jon Stone - 2024 - Common Knowledge 30 (1):144-145.
    In browsing the contents of this book, my first thought was, “Well, sure, to a hammer everything looks like a nail.” Or, more cryptically to those in earshot, I uttered, “Well, sure, once you've made it through Ulysses everything can sound like Joyce.” But the joy and mental workout of All Future Plunges come not from nitpicking particular Joycean tropes or images but rather from considering Joyce as a cultural phenomenon for all who followed to engage with, immerse themselves in, (...)
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