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  1.  2
    On Talking Together About Ordinary Abortion.Mara Buchbinder - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (4):44-45.
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  2.  2
    On Avoiding Deep Dementia.Norman L. Cantor - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (4):15-24.
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  3.  3
    When Voluntary Stopping of Eating and Drinking in Advanced Dementia Is No Longer Voluntary.Elizabeth Chuang & Lauren Sydney Flicker - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (4):24-25.
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  4. Defining Misprescribing to Inform Prescription Opioid Policy.Kelly K. Dineen - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (4):5-6.
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  5.  2
    Advance Directives and Discrimination Against People with Dementia.Rebecca Dresser - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (4):26-27.
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  6.  5
    Illness as a Crisis of Meaning.Michael Hauskeller - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (4):42-43.
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  7. Proposed Regulations Favor Providers’ Conscience Rights Over Patients’ Rights.Sandra H. Johnson - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (4):3-4.
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  8.  2
    Advance Directives and Dementia.Gregory E. Kaebnick - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (4):2-2.
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  9.  1
    Bigger, Faster, Stronger, More Ethical.Brendan Parent - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (4):46-47.
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  10.  5
    Are Obese Children Abused Children?Maura Priest - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (4):31-41.
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  11. The Next Wave in Health Care Priority Setting.Annette Rid - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (4):inside front cover-inside front.
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  12. Discriminatory Demands by Patients.Philip M. Rosoff - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (4):7-11.
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  13. Caring for Patients with Substance Use Disorders: Addressing a Missed Opportunity in the Hospital.Rachel Elizabeth Simon & Matthew Tobey - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (4):12-14.
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  14.  2
    An Open Letter to Norman Cantor Regarding Dementia and Physician‐Assisted Suicide.Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (4):28-30.
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  15.  1
    Learning From Me Too.Rachel L. Zacharias - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (4):inside back cover-inside back co.
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  16.  3
    You Can't Always Get What You Want: Preferences and Their Limits.Nancy Berlinger - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (3):40-40.
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  17.  3
    Only in Silence.Daniel Eison - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (3):3-4.
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  18.  7
    In the Balance: Weighing Preferences of Decisionally Incapacitated Patients.Laura Guidry‐Grimes - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (3):41-42.
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  19.  3
    Rescue Via Genetic Findings.Laura Haupt - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (3):2-2.
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  20.  4
    Genetic Privacy, Disease Prevention, and the Principle of Rescue.Madison K. Kilbride - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (3):10-17.
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  21. A Note—and a Call—From the Weeds.Stephen R. Latham - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (3):inside front cover-inside front.
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  22.  5
    Genetic Information, the Principle of Rescue, and Special Obligations.S. Matthew Liao & Jordan MacKenzie - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (3):18-19.
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  23.  4
    Groundhog Day for Medical Artificial Intelligence.Alex John London - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (3):inside back cover-inside back co.
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  24. Returning Incidental Findings in Low‐Resource Settings: A Case of Rescue?Douglas Mackay - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (3):28-30.
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  25. The Human Being in Full.Gilbert Meilaender - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (3):43-45.
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  26.  2
    Personalized Medicine Is the Postgenomic Condition.Carolyn P. Neuhaus - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (3):46-47.
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  27.  3
    GINA at Ten and the Future of Genetic Nondiscrimination Law.Mark A. Rothstein - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (3):5-7.
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  28. Incidental Findings in Low‐Resource Settings.Haley K. Sullivan & Benjamin E. Berkman - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (3):20-28.
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  29.  2
    Capacity for Preferences: Respecting Patients with Compromised Decision‐Making.Jason Adam Wasserman & Mark Christopher Navin - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (3):31-39.
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  30. Change Without Change? Assessing Medicare Reimbursement for Advance Care Planning.Megan S. Wright - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (3):8-9.
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  31.  16
    Nudge or Grudge? Choice Architecture and Parental Decision‐Making.Jennifer Blumenthal-Barby & Douglas J. Opel - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (2):33-39.
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  32.  2
    Progress: Its Glories and Pitfalls.Daniel Callahan - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (2):18-21.
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  33.  3
    Progress: Its Glories and Pitfalls.Daniel Callahan - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (2):18-21.
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  34.  2
    The Purchased Patient Advocate.Carl Elliott - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (2):40-41.
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  35.  5
    Financial Conflicts of Interest at FDA Drug Advisory Committee Meetings.Michael J. Hayes & Vinay Prasad - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (2):10-13.
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  36.  4
    Genome “Surgery”?Marnie Klein - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (2):inside front cover-inside front.
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  37.  5
    Making Reproductive Choices in the Face of Genetic Uncertainty.Sigal Klipstein - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (2):42-43.
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  38.  5
    Abortion Bans, Doctors, and the Criminalization of Patients.Michelle Oberman - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (2):5-6.
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  39.  16
    Mass Shootings, Mental Illness, and Gun Control.Sean Philpott-Jones - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (2):7-9.
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  40.  3
    One Ventilator Too Few?Noah Polzin-Rosenberg - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (2):3-4.
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  41.  3
    Organ Transplantation and the Uniform Anatomical Gift Act: A Fifty‐Year Perspective.Blair L. Sadler & Alfred M. Sadler - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (2):14-18.
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  42.  8
    The Right to Know: A Revised Standard for Reporting Incidental Findings.G. Owen Schaefer & Julian Savulescu - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (2):22-32.
    The “best-medical-interests” standard for reporting findings does not go far enough. Research subjects have a right to know about any comprehensible piece of information about them that is generated by research in which they are participating. An even broader standard may sometimes be appropriate: if subjects agree to accept information that they may not understand, then all information may be disclosed.
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  43.  3
    Fetal Medicine and the Pregnant Woman.David Wasserman - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (2):inside back cover-inside back co.
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  44.  4
    Fetal Medicine and the Pregnant Woman.David Wasserman - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (2):inside back cover-inside back co.
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  45.  7
    The Different Moral Bases of Patient and Surrogate Decision‐Making.Daniel Brudney - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (1):37-41.
    My topic is a problem with our practice of surrogate decision-making in health care, namely, the problem of the surrogate who is not doing her job—the surrogate who cannot be reached or the surrogate who seems to refuse to understand or to be unable to understand the clinical situation. The analysis raises a question about the surrogate who simply disagrees with the medical team. One might think that such a surrogate is doing her job—the team just doesn't like how she (...)
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  46.  3
    On Nudging Health.Shlomo Cohen - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (1):45-46.
    Ideas of nudging, choice architecture, and libertarian paternalism have sparked much controversy. Some find in them a long-sought optimal harmonization of the commitments to beneficent, welfare-increasing influence and to respecting persons, whereas people on the opposite end see in them an especially sinister form of control. One area in which these ideas are of greatest importance is health care, where improving people's decisions, under the constraint of respect for persons, is a vital concern. Nudging Health: Health Law and Behavioral Economics, (...)
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  47.  1
    Rationing Care Through Collaboration and Shared Values.James E. Sabin - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (1):22-24.
    Although “rationing” continues to be a dirty word for the public in health policy discourse, Nir Eyal and colleagues handle the concept exactly right in their article in this issue of the Hastings Center Report. They correctly characterize rationing as an ethical requirement, not a moral abomination. They identify the key health policy question as how rationing can best be done, not whether it should be done at all. They make a cogent defense of what they call “rationing through inconvenience” (...)
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  48.  5
    Can Rationing Through Inconvenience Be Ethical?Nir Eyal, Paul L. Romain & Christopher Robertson - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (1):10-22.
    In this article, we provide a comprehensive analysis and a normative assessment of rationing through inconvenience as a form of rationing. By “rationing through inconvenience” in the health sphere, we refer to a nonfinancial burden that is either intended to cause or has the effect of causing patients or clinicians to choose an option for health-related consumption that is preferred by the health system for its fairness, efficiency, or other distributive desiderata beyond assisting the immediate patient. We argue that under (...)
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  49.  3
    Market Language, Moral Language.Susan Dorr Goold - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (1):inside back cover-inside back co.
    Those who advocate higher out-of-pocket spending, especially high deductibles, to keep health care costs better controlled without losing quality use market language to talk about how people should think about health care. Consumers—that is, patients—should hunt for bargains. Clip coupons. Shop around. Patients need to have more “skin in the game.” Consumer-patients will then choose more carefully and prudently and use less unnecessary health care. Unfailingly, “skin” refers to having money at stake. Usually, those arguing for high deductibles express dismay (...)
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  50.  10
    Tackling Obesity and Disease: The Culprit Is Sugar; the Response Is Legal Regulation.Lawrence O. Gostin - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (1):5-7.
    It is staggering to observe the new normal in America: 37.9 percent of adults are obese, and 70.7 percent are either obese or overweight. One out of every five minors is obese. The real tragedy, of course, is the disability, suffering, and early death that devastates families and communities. But all of society pays, with the annual medical cost estimated at $147 billion. The causal pathways are complex, but if we drill down, sugar is a deeply consequential pathway to obesity, (...)
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  51.  2
    It's All Relative.Adira Hulkower & Lauren S. Flicker - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (1):43-44.
    In this issue of the Hastings Center Report, Daniel Brudney suggests that clinicians have an overly deferential attitude toward their patients’ surrogate decision-makers that is rooted in a wrongful investment of moral authority. He maintains that surrogate decision-makers have no moral right to decide for their loved ones and that their value in the decision-making process is limited to their knowledge of their loved one's preferences. If operationalized, Brudney's framework would ease the way for clinicians to remove a surrogate who (...)
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  52.  4
    The Intimate Responsibility of Surrogate Decision‐Making.Hilde Lindemann - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (1):41-42.
    Daniel Brudney's clear-headed analysis, in this issue of the Hastings Center Report, of the difference between a patient's and a surrogate's right to make medical treatment decisions contributes to a longstanding conversation in bioethics. Brudney offers an epistemological and a moral argument for the patient's and the surrogate's right to decide. The epistemological argument is the same for both parties: the patient has a right to decide because she is presumed to know her own interests better than anyone else, and (...)
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  53.  2
    Time Is Ethics.Mark Mercurio - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (1):3-4.
    Early in my career as a neonatologist, I was called into the hospital for a newborn who would not stop crying. Screaming, really. When I entered the unit, I was greeted by a loud, shrill, distinctive cry. After hearing the history and examining the baby, I just stood there for a while, watching and listening. It took some time, but eventually, I noticed a subtle regularity, a rhythmicity. I took off my watch, placed it on the bed next to the (...)
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  54.  5
    Community Engagement and Field Trials of Genetically Modified Insects and Animals.Carolyn P. Neuhaus - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (1):25-36.
    New techniques for the genetic modification of organisms are creating new strategies for addressing persistent public health challenges. For example, the company Oxitec has conducted field trials internationally—and has attempted to conduct field trials in the United States—of a genetically modified mosquito that can be used to control dengue, Zika, and some other mosquito-borne diseases. In 2016, a report commissioned by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine discussed the potential benefits and risks of another strategy, using gene drives. (...)
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  55.  2
    Bioethics as Care Work.Joel Michael Reynolds - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (1):inside front cover-inside front.
    [Excerpt]: German philosopher Martin Heidegger argued that humans are defined by care. The term he used, “Sorge,” picks out a wide range of caring relations, including sorrow, worry, the making of arrangements, and even fending for another. Since coming to The Hastings Center, I've been struck by the genuine care definitive of its scholars’ relationship to their work. Care about newborns, the elderly, and nonhuman animals. Care about doctors, nurses, and health care institutions. Care expressed in the panoply of ways (...)
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  56.  1
    Raising the Stakes for Nondiscrimination Protections in the ACA.Kristen Underhill - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (1):8-9.
    In the struggle over the durability of the Affordable Care Act, defenders of the ACA stand guard at many fronts. A major contribution of the ACA to nondiscrimination law, however, appears increasingly vulnerable. The ACA established significant new nondiscrimination protections for patients under section 1557 and its implementing regulations. Several of these regulations—including protections on the basis of gender identity and pregnancy termination—are now under reconsideration at the Department of Health and Human Services, after a nationwide injunction lasting almost a (...)
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  57.  1
    Integrating Scenario Planning and Cost-Benefit Methods.Stephen C. Aldrich - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (S1):S65-S69.
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  58. Whose Odyssey Is It? Family‐Centered Care in the Genomic Era.Jeffrey P. Brosco - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (S2):S20-S22.
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  59. Single‐Gene Sequencing in Newborn Screening: Success, Challenge, Hope.Robert J. Currier - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (S2):S37-S38.
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  60.  2
    Demystifying Evidence‐Based Policy Analysis by Revealing Hidden Value‐Laden Constraints.Adam M. Finkel - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (S1):S21-S49.
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  61.  1
    Families’ Experiences with Newborn Screening: A Critical Source of Evidence.Rachel Grob, Scott Roberts & Stefan Timmermans - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (S2):S29-S31.
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  62. Using Newborn Sequencing to Advance Understanding of the Natural History of Disease.Ingrid A. Holm - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (S2):S45-S46.
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  63.  3
    Are Parents Really Obligated to Learn as Much as Possible About Their Children's Genomes?Josephine Johnston & Eric Juengst - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (S2):S14-S15.
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  64. Sequencing Newborns: A Call for Nuanced Use of Genomic Technologies.Josephine Johnston, John D. Lantos, Aaron Goldenberg, Flavia Chen, Erik Parens & Barbara A. Koenig - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (S2):S2-S6.
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  65.  2
    CBA and Precaution: Policy-Making About Emerging Technologies.Gregory E. Kaebnick & Michael K. Gusmano - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (S1):S88-S96.
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  66.  3
    Making Policies About Emerging Technologies.Gregory E. Kaebnick & Michael K. Gusmano - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (S1):S2-S11.
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  67. A New Era, New Strategies: Education and Communication Strategies to Manage Greater Access to Genomic Information.Megan A. Lewis, Natasha Bonhomme & Cinnamon S. Bloss - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (S2):S25-S27.
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  68.  1
    Benefit‐Cost Analysis and Emerging Technologies.Brian Mannix - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (S1):S12-S20.
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  69.  1
    My Diagnostic Odyssey—A Call to Expand Access to Genomic Testing for the Next Generation.Jeremy Michelson - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (S2):S32-S34.
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  70.  1
    Behavioral Economics and the Public Acceptance of Synthetic Biology.Adam Oliver - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (S1):S50-S55.
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  71.  1
    Eugenics Redux: “Reproductive Benefit” as a Rationale for Newborn Screening.Diane B. Paul - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (S2):S12-S13.
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  72. Commercial Interests, the Technological Imperative, and Advocates: Three Forces Driving Genomic Sequencing in Newborns.Stacey Pereira & Ellen Wright Clayton - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (S2):S43-S44.
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  73. What Genomic Sequencing Can Offer Universal Newborn Screening Programs.Cynthia M. Powell - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (S2):S18-S19.
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  74. Lessons for Sequencing From the Addition of Severe Combined Immunodeficiency to Newborn Screening Panels.Jennifer M. Puck - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (S2):S7-S9.
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  75.  1
    Lessons From Environmental Regulation.Amy Sinden - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (S1):S56-S64.
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  76.  2
    From CBA to Precautionary Appraisal: Practical Responses to Intractable Problems.Andrew Stirling & Josie Coburn - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (S1):S78-S87.
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  77.  2
    Beyond Cost-Benefit Analysis in the Governance of Synthetic Biology.Wendell Wallach, Marc Saner & Gary Marchant - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (S1):S70-S77.
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  78.  1
    The Legal Dimensions of Genomic Sequencing in Newborn Screening.Rachel L. Zacharias, Monica E. Smith & Jaime S. King - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (S2):S39-S41.
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