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  1.  4
    Revisiting the ‘Darwin–Marx Correspondence’: Multiple Discovery and the Rhetoric of Priority.Joel Barnes - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (2):29-54.
    Between the 1930s and the mid 1970s, it was commonly believed that in 1880 Karl Marx had proposed to dedicate to Charles Darwin a volume or translation of Capital but that Darwin had refused. The detail was often interpreted by scholars as having larger significance for the question of the relationship between Darwinian evolutionary biology and Marxist political economy. In 1973–4, two scholars working independently—Lewis Feuer, professor of sociology at Toronto, and Margaret Fay, a graduate student at Berkeley—determined simultaneously that (...)
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  2.  1
    Criticism as Self-Analysis.Clive Barnett - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (2):219-228.
  3.  10
    Frederick Antal and the Marxist Challenge to Art History.Jim Berryman - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (2):55-76.
    First published in 1948, Frederick Antal’s Florentine Painting and Its Social Background was an important milestone in anglophone art history. Based on European examples, including Max Dvořák, it sought to understand art history’s relationship to social and intellectual history. When Antal, a Hungarian émigré, arrived in Britain in 1933, he encountered an inward-looking discipline preoccupied with formalism and connoisseurship; or, as he phrased it, art historians of ‘the older persuasion’ ignorant of ‘the fruitful achievements of modern historical research’. Despite its (...)
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  4. On the Assumption of Self-Reflective Subjectivity.Christoforos Bouzanis - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (2):167-193.
    Contemporary social theory has consistently emphasized habitual action, rule-following, and role-performing as key aspects of social life, yet the challenge remains of combining these aspects with the omnipresent phenomenon of self-reflective conduct. This article attempts to tackle this challenge by proposing useful distinctions that can facilitate further interdisciplinary research on self-reflection. To this end, I argue that we need a more sophisticated set of distinctions and categories in our understanding of habitual action. The analysis casts light on the idea that (...)
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  5.  1
    Freud in Cambridge Review Symposium.Felicity Callard & Sarah Marks - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (2):194-197.
  6. Reply to My Commentators – Thinking with Forrester: Dreams, True Crimes, and Histories of Change.Laura Jean Cameron - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (2):229-238.
  7.  1
    Freud in Cambridge: An Institutional Romance? [REVIEW]Jessica Dubow - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (2):212-218.
  8.  8
    Rahel Jaeggi’s Theory of Alienation.Justin Evans - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (2):126-143.
    Rahel Jaeggi’s theory of alienation has received less attention than her work on forms of life and capitalism. This theory avoids the problems of traditional theories of alienation: objectivism, paternalism, and essentialism. It also sidesteps post-structuralist criticisms of the theory of alienation. However, Jaeggi’s theory is flawed in two ways: it is not historically specific, and so cannot explain why alienation is a problem for modernity rather than other historical periods, and it is difficult to connect to social critique. I (...)
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  9.  1
    Social Science and Marxist Humanism Beyond Collectivism in Socialist Romania.Adela Hîncu - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (2):77-100.
    This article brings together the history of the social sciences and the history of social thought in Socialist Romania. It is concerned with the development of ideas about the social beyond collectivism, especially about the relationship between individual and society under socialism, from the early 1960s to the end of the 1970s. The analysis speaks to three major themes in the current historiography of Cold War social science. First, the article investigates the role of disciplinary specialization in the advancement of (...)
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  10.  1
    Fort/Da/Freud.Paul Kingsbury - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (2):198-204.
  11.  6
    Cultivating Trust, Producing Knowledge: The Management of Archaeological Labour and the Making of a Discipline.Allison Mickel & Nylah Byrd - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (2):3-28.
    Like any science, archaeology relies on trust between actors involved in the production of knowledge. In the early history of archaeology, this epistemic trust was complicated by histories of Orientalism in the Middle East and colonialism more broadly. The racial and power dynamics underpinning 19th- and early 20th-century archaeology precluded the possibility of interpersonal moral trust between foreign archaeologists and locally hired labourers. In light of this, archaeologists created systems of reward, punishment, and surveillance to ensure the honest behaviour of (...)
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  12.  5
    Simulating Marx: Herbert A. Simon's Cognitivist Approach to Dialectical Materialism.Enrico Petracca - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (2):101-125.
    Starting in the 1950s, computer programs for simulating cognitive processes and intelligent behaviour were the hallmark of Good Old-Fashioned Artificial Intelligence and ‘cognitivist’ cognitive science. This article examines a somewhat neglected case of simulation pursued by one of the founding fathers of simulation methodology, Herbert A. Simon. In the 1970s and 1980s, Simon had repeated contacts with Marxist countries and scientists, in the context of which he advanced the idea that cognitivism could be used as a framework for simulating dialectical (...)
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  13.  1
    A Public Inquiry Into Freud’s Influence Upon Cambridge. [REVIEW]Steve Pile - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (2):205-211.
    Review Symposium on John Forrester and Laura Cameron’s Freud In Cambridge.
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  14.  1
    The Idea of an Ethically Committed Social Science.Leonidas Tsilipakos - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (2):144-166.
    This article presents a long overdue analysis of the idea of an ethically committed social science, which, after the demise of positivism and the deeming of moral neutrality as impossible, has come to dominate the self-understanding of many contemporary sociological approaches. Once adequately specified, however, the idea is shown to be ethically questionable in that it works against the moral commitments constitutive of academic life. The argument is conducted with resources from the work of Peter Winch, thus establishing its continuing (...)
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  15. ‘Flash Houses’: Public Houses and Geographies of Moral Contagion in 19th-Century London.Eleanor Bland - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (1):32-55.
    ‘Flash houses’, a distinctive type of public house associated with criminal activity, are a shadowy and little-studied aspect of early 19th-century London. This article situates flash houses within a wide perspective, arguing that the discourses on flash houses were part of concerns about the threat of the urban environment to the moral character of its inhabitants. The article draws on an original synthesis of a range of sources that refer to flash houses, including contemporary literature, newspapers, court documents, and government (...)
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  16.  4
    From Cohort to Community: The Emotional Work of Birthday Cards in the Medical Research Council National Survey of Health and Development, 1946–2018.Hannah J. Elizabeth & Daisy Payling - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (1):158-188.
    The Medical Research Council National Survey of Health and Development is Britain’s longest-running birth cohort study. From their birth in 1946 until the present day, its research participants, or study members, have filled out questionnaires and completed cognitive or physical examinations every few years. Among other outcomes, the findings of these studies have framed how we understand health inequalities. Throughout the decades and multiple follow-up studies, each year the study members have received a birthday card from the survey staff. Although (...)
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  17. An ‘Ingenious System of Practical Contacts’: Historical Origins and Development of the Institute of Child Welfare Research at Columbia University's Teachers College.Catriel Fierro - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (1):56-86.
    During the first two decades of the 20th century, the expansion of private foundations and philanthropic initiatives in the United States converged with a comprehensive, nationwide agenda of progressive education and post-war social reconstruction that situated childhood at its core. From 1924 to 1928, the Laura Spelman Rockefeller Memorial was the main foundation behind the aggressive, systematic funding of the child development movement in North America. A pioneering institution, the Institute of Child Welfare Research, established in 1924 at Columbia's Teachers (...)
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  18. The Emergence of the Idea of ‘the Welfare State’ in British Political Discourse.David Garland - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (1):132-157.
    This article traces the emergence of the term welfare state in British political discourse and describes competing efforts to define its meaning. It presents a genealogy of the concept's emergence and its subsequent integration into various political scripts, tracing the struggles that sought to name, define, and narrate what welfare state would be taken to mean. It shows that the concept emerged only after the core programmes to which it referred had already been enacted into law and that the referents (...)
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  19.  2
    Race in Post-War Science: The Swiss Case in a Global Context.Pascal Germann - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (1):216-241.
    The historiography on the concept of race in the post-war sciences has focused predominantly on the UNESCO campaign against scientific racism and on the Anglo-American research community. By way of contrast, this article highlights the history of the concept of race from a thus far unexplored angle: from Swiss research centres and their global interconnections with racial researchers around the world. The article investigates how the acceptance, resonance, and prestige of racial research changed during the post-war years. It analyses what (...)
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  20. A Code for Care and Control: The PIN as an Operator of Interoperability in the Nordic Welfare State.Ilpo Helén & Marja Alastalo - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (1):242-265.
    Many states make use of personal identity numbers to govern people living in their territory and jurisdiction, but only a few rely on an all-purpose PIN used throughout the public and private sectors. This article examines the all-purpose PIN in Finland as a political technology that brings people to the sphere of public welfare services and subjects them to governance by public authorities and expert institutions. Drawing on documentary materials and interviews, it unpacks the history and uses of the PIN (...)
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  21.  25
    Not Merely the Absence of Disease: A Genealogy of the WHO’s Positive Health Definition.Lars Thorup Larsen - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (1):111-131.
    The 1948 constitution of the World Health Organization defines health as ‘a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity’. It was a bold and revolutionary health idea to gain international consensus in a period characterized by fervent anti-communism. This article explores the genealogy of the health definition and demonstrates how it was possible to expand the scope of health, redefine it as ‘well-being’, and overcome ideological resistance to progressive and international (...)
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  22.  8
    Madness, Virtue, and Ecology: A Classical Indian Approach to Psychiatric Disturbance.Chakravarthi Ram-Prasad - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (1):3-31.
    The Caraka Saṃhitā, the first classical Indian medical compendium, covers a wide variety of pharmacological and therapeutic treatment, while also sketching out a philosophical anthropology of the human subject who is the patient of the physicians for whom this text was composed. In this article, I outline some of the relevant aspects of this anthropology – in particular, its understanding of ‘mind’ and other elements that constitute the subject – before exploring two ways in which it approaches ‘psychiatric’ disorder: one (...)
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  23. ‘A Troublesome Girl is Pushed Through’: Morality, Biological Determinism, Resistance, Resilience, and the Canadian Child Migration Schemes, 1883–1939.Wendy Sims-Schouten - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (1):87-110.
    This article critically analyses correspondence and decisions regarding children/young people who were included in the Canadian child migration schemes that ran between 1883 and 1939, and those who were deemed ‘undeserving’ and outside the scope of the schemes. Drawing on critical realist ontology, a metatheory that centralises the causal non-linear dynamics and generative mechanisms in the individual, the cultural sphere, and wider society, the research starts from the premise that the principle of ‘less or more eligibility’ lies at the heart (...)
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  24. Discourses on Im/Migrants, Ethnic Minorities, and Infectious Disease: Fifty Years of Tuberculosis Reporting in the United Kingdom.Hella von Unger & Penelope Scott - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (1):189-215.
    Ethnicity and im/migrant classification systems and their constituent categories have a long history in the construction of public health knowledge on tuberculosis in the United Kingdom. This article critically examines the categories employed and the epidemiological discourses on TB, im/migrants, and ethnic minorities in health reporting between 1965 and 2015. We employ a Sociology of Knowledge Approach to Discourse Analysis to trace the continuities and changes in the categories used and in the discursive construction of im/migrants, ethnic minorities, and TB. (...)
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