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  1.  3
    The Philosophical Baby and Socratic Orality.Antonio Consentino - 2020 - Childhood and Philosophy 16 (36):01-16.
    Lipman’s curriculum of “Philosophy for Children” was the outcome of a harmonious and fruitful partnership between philosophy and pedagogy, but over the time practice shows the risk of a double fall and reduction: on the one side into the ditch of pedagese and, on the other, into the ditch of philosofese. Using the expression “Philosophical Practice of Community” instead of “Philosophy for children” appears preferable to protect the latter from the risk of being considered, because of its evocative vagueness, both (...)
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  2.  2
    Educational Deontology in the Community of Philosophical Inquiry.Silvia Demozzi & Marta Ilardo - 2020 - Childhood and Philosophy 16 (36):01-16.
    The paper aims at offering a pedagogical perspective as part of the debate on philosophical practices with children, referring particularly to educational deontology matters emerging when “uncomfortable” questions occur. Many of the questions which arise during sessions of philosophical are left unanswered, being perceived as uncomfortable. Our reflection is on what educational deontology requires in order to deal with the challenge that these kinds of questions bring along. Starting from the concept of deontology proposed by the educationalist Mariagrazia Contini and (...)
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  3.  3
    The Paradox of Philosophy for Children and How to Resolve It.Maria Kasmirli - 2020 - Childhood and Philosophy 16 (36):01-24.
    There is a paradox in the idea of philosophy for children. Good teaching starts from the concrete and particular, and it engages with each student’s individual interests, beliefs, and experiences. Preadolescents find this approach more natural than a more impersonal one and respond better to it. But doing philosophy involves focusing on the abstract and general and disengaging oneself from one’s personal interests and beliefs. It involves critiquing one’s attitudes, seeing abstract relations, and applying general principles. So, if good teaching (...)
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  4.  3
    The Child and the P4c Curriculum.Stefano Oliverio - 2020 - Childhood and Philosophy 16 (36):01-26.
    In this paper I take my cue from what I suggest calling “the Adamitic modernity.” By this phrase I endeavor to capture a specific ‘removal’ of childhood that occurs in the Cartesian gesture of the enthroning of Reason. By drawing upon a reading of the major philosophical works of Descartes, I will argue that one of the main thrusts of his conceptual device is a deep-seated, and even anguished, mistrust of childhood and its errors. To put it in a nutshell: (...)
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  5.  1
    O Insulto da Feiura Na Escola: Insurreições Contra o Capital.Steferson Zanoni Roseiro & Janete Magalhães Carvalho - 2020 - Childhood and Philosophy 16 (36):01-25.
    Wondering what would happen with the control logic if the ugliness take control on school, this essay uses the fabulation as a research method to produce fables of insurrection against the Capitalism. It starts from the principle that in the contemporary context the embellishing practices have constituted themselves as a way to control the body. This way, ugliness – usually recognized as the opposite to beauty – is presented as a way to confront the regulator beauty. Methodologically, the research was (...)
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  6.  3
    Possible Connections Between the Montessori Method and Philosophy for Children.Mariangela Scarpini - 2020 - Childhood and Philosophy 16 (36):01-22.
    This paper aims to focus on certain aspects of two education methods: one initiated in the first half of the twentieth century by Maria Montessori, and the other in the second half of that century by Matthew Lipman. The aim – neither comparative nor analytical – is to shed light on the connections and, more specifically, the elements of the Montessori Method that reflect on Lipman’s proposal. The question this paper aims to answer is: can P4C find fertile ground in (...)
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  7.  4
    Why Am I Here? The Challenges of Exploring Children's Existential Questions in the Community of Inquiry.Luca Zanetti - 2020 - Childhood and Philosophy 16 (36):01-26.
    Children ask existential questions, that is, questions about death, the meaning of existence, free will, God, the origin of everything, and kindred questions. P4/wC has the aspiration to give to children the occasion to discover and explore their questions in a safe environment, the community of inquiry. Thus, existential questioning should be possible in a community of inquiry. However, it is unclear whether the pedagogy of the community of inquiry can accommodate existential questioning. The chief trouble is that existential questioning (...)
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  8.  5
    Improvising Inquiry in the Community: The Teacher Profile.Eleonora Zorzi & Marina Santi - 2020 - Childhood and Philosophy 16 (36):01-17.
    Improvising involves participants adopting attitudes and dispositions that make them welcoming towards what happens, even when it is unforeseen. How is the discourse on improvisation and a disposition to improvise in the community connected to the concept of inquiry? What type of reasoning can be developed? This paper aims to reflect on two different perspectives. On the one hand, we consider the feasibility of improvising inquiry in the community, promoting inquiry as an activity that can be developed extemporaneously when teacher (...)
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  9.  31
    Mapping Identity Prejudice: Locations of Epistemic Injustice in Philosophy for/with Children.Peter Paul Ejera Elicor - 2020 - Childhood and Philosophy 16 (1):1-25.
    This article aims to map the locations of identity prejudice that occurs in the context of a Community of Inquiry. My claim is that epistemic injustice, which usually originates from seemingly ‘minor’ cases of identity prejudice, can potentially leak into the actual practice of P4wC. Drawing from Fricker, the various forms of epistemic injustice are made explicit when epistemic practices are framed within concrete social circumstances where power, privilege and authority intersect, which is observable in school settings. In connection, despite (...)
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