20 found

Year:

  1.  2
    From the Love Studio.Asma Abbas - 2017 - Hypatia 32 (1):199-204.
  2.  1
    Love as a Hollow: Merleau‐Ponty's Promise of Queer Love.M. Burke Megan - 2017 - Hypatia 32 (1):54-68.
    This article argues that Maurice Merleau-Ponty advances a queer notion of love. In particular, I argue that his notion of love as an institution, as a hollow fueled by the imaginary dimension of existence, shows that love unhinges petrified ideals of gender. I suggest that the crucial insight to be found in Merleau-Ponty's account of love is that love is a lived openness that invites us to seek out new ways of being.
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  3. Affective Equality: Love Matters.Cantillon Sara & Lynch Kathleen - 2017 - Hypatia 32 (1):169-186.
    The nurturing that produces love, care, and solidarity constitutes a discrete social system of affective relations. Affective relations are not social derivatives, subordinate to economic, political, or cultural relations in matters of social justice. Rather, they are productive, materialist human relations that constitute people mentally, emotionally, physically, and socially. As love laboring is highly gendered, and is a form of work that is both inalienable and noncommodifiable, affective relations are therefore sites of political import for social justice. We argue that (...)
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  4.  4
    Feminist Love Studies—Editors' Introduction.Ann Ferguson & Margaret E. Toye - 2017 - Hypatia 32 (1):5-18.
  5.  2
    Epistemic Injustice and Resistance in the Chiapas Highlands: The Zapatista Case.Gallegos Sergio & Quinn Carol - 2017 - Hypatia 32 (1).
    Though Indigenous women in Mexico have traditionally exhibited some of the highest levels of maternal mortality in the country—a fact that some authors have argued was an important reason to explain the EZLN uprising in 1994—there is some evidence that the rate of maternal mortality has fallen in Zapatista communities in the Chiapas Highlands in the last two decades, and that other health indicators have improved. In this article, we offer an account of the modest success that Zapatista communities have (...)
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  6. Why Love Kills: Power, Gender Dichotomy, and Romantic Femicide.Federica Gregoratto - 2017 - Hypatia 32 (1):135-151.
    This article conceptually investigates a type of gender murder, “romantic femicide.” I understand this as the extreme form of violence that occurs as a result of men's incapacity to cope with their partners’ autonomy and power. The incapacity is not merely an individual pathology but is rather rooted in the dynamic of recognition characterizing love under structural conditions of gender dichotomy. After having sketched out the current discussion about femicide and its shortcomings, I argue for the hypothesis in three steps. (...)
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  7. Love and the Patriarch: Augustine and Women.Patricia L. Grosse - 2017 - Hypatia 32 (1):119-134.
    Theories concerning love in the West tend to be bound by the problematic constraints of patriarchal conceptions of what counts ontologically as “true” or “universal” love. It seems that feminist love studies must choose between shining light on these constraints or bursting through them. In this article I give a feminist analysis of Augustine of Hippo's theory of love through a philosophical, psychological, and theological reading of his complicated relationships with women. I argue that, given the “embodied” nature of his (...)
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  8. Hetero‐Love in Patriarchy: An Autobiographical Substantiation.Gunnarsson Lena - 2017 - Hypatia 32 (1):187-192.
  9.  1
    Idealization and Abstraction in Models of Injustice.Leif Hancox‐Li - 2017 - Hypatia 32 (1).
    Charles Mills has argued against ideal theory in political philosophy on the basis that it contains idealizations. He calls for political philosophers to do more nonideal theory, namely political theory that pays more attention to the most visible oppressions in society, such as those based on race, gender, and class. Mills's argument relies on a distinction between idealization and abstraction. Idealizations involve adding false assumptions to one's model, which is unacceptable, whereas abstractions merely leave out details without undermining descriptive power. (...)
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  10.  3
    Personal Autonomy, Social Identity, and Oppressive Social Contexts.Johnston Rebekah - 2017 - Hypatia 32 (1).
    Attempts to articulate the ways in which membership in socially subordinated social identities can impede one's autonomy have largely unfolded as part of the debate between different types of internalist theories in relation to the problem of internalized oppression. The different internalist positions, however, employ a damage model for understanding the role of social subordination in limiting autonomy. I argue that we need an externalist condition in order to capture the ways in which membership in a socially subordinated identity can (...)
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  11. Remembering and Loving in Relationships Involving Dying, Death, and Grief.Christine M. Koggel - 2017 - Hypatia 32 (1):193-198.
  12. Anna Julia Cooper's Black Feminist Love‐Politics.Vivian M. May - 2017 - Hypatia 32 (1):35-53.
    To flesh out love's potential for transformative imaginaries and politics, it is important to explore earlier examples of Black feminist theorizing on love. In this spirit, I examine Anna Julia Cooper, an early Black feminist educator, intellectual, and activist whose work is generally overlooked in feminist and anti-racist thinking on love, affect, and social change. Contesting narrow readings of Cooper, I first explore how critics might engage in more “loving” approaches to reading her work. I then delineate some of her (...)
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  13.  3
    A Dangerous Subject: The Fashion Model and the Beauty/Narcissism Double Bind.Cecilie Basberg Neumann - 2017 - Hypatia 32 (1).
    In the wake of modernity, women's sexuality was positioned in a way that created a beauty/narcissism double bind that is still with us today. My concern in this article is that the subject position of “fashion model” serves as a constant reminder of this split, which is directed at all women and weakens the generalized woman's political agency. Fashion models themselves experience harassment and humiliation as well as pleasure and desire in their work as fashion models. However, the small portion (...)
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  14. The Role of Darwin in Elizabeth Grosz's Deleuzian Feminist Theory: Sexual Difference, Ontology, and Intervention.Tuija Pulkkinen - 2017 - Hypatia 32 (1).
    In this article on Elizabeth Grosz's philosophy and its implications for discussions about feminist theory, I first suggest that Charles Darwin plays a particular role in Grosz's recent ontological thought. This role is to provide help in joining together two incompatible sources in her work: Gilles Deleuze's monistic ontology of a constant flow of new differentiations, on the one hand, and Luce Irigaray's thought of sexual difference as the primary ontological difference, on the other. I argue that Grosz's intellectual project (...)
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  15. A Revolution of Love: Thinking Through a Dialectic That is Not “One”.Laura Roberts - 2017 - Hypatia 32 (1):69-85.
    Luce Irigaray argues that the way to overcome the culture of narcissism in the Western tradition is to recognize sexuate difference and to refigure subjectivity as sexuate. This article is an attempt to unpack how Irigaray's philosophical refiguring of love as an intermediary works in this process of reimagining subjectivity as sexuate. If we trace the moments in Irigaray's philosophy where she engages with Hegel's dialectic, and rethinks this dialectical process via the question of sexual difference and a refiguring of (...)
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  16.  1
    Work the Root: Black Feminism, Hoodoo Love Rituals, and Practices of Freedom.Lindsey Stewart - 2017 - Hypatia 32 (1):103-118.
    In “Post-Liberation Feminism,” Ladelle McWhorter raises the question of what practices will be helpful to further feminist goals if we are no longer in a state of domination, but are still oppressed. McWhorter finds resources in Michel Foucault's concept of “practices of freedom” to begin to answer this question. I build upon McWhorter's insight while recalling Angela Davis's Blues Legacies and Black Feminism: namely, that sexual love, as conceived in hoodoo and the blues, became a terrain upon which newly emancipated (...)
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  17.  5
    Losing Hope: Injustice and Moral Bitterness.Katie Stockdale - 2017 - Hypatia 32 (1).
    In this article, I defend a conception of bitterness as a moral emotion and offer an evaluative framework for assessing when instances of bitterness are morally justified. I argue that bitterness is a form of unresolved anger involving a loss of hope that an injustice or other moral wrong will be sufficiently acknowledged and addressed. Orienting the discussion around instances of bitterness in response to social and political injustices, I argue that bitterness is sometimes morally justified even if it is (...)
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  18. Mother Love, Maternal Ambivalence, and the Possibility of Empowered Mothering.Tatjana Takševa - 2017 - Hypatia 32 (1):152-168.
    Dominant cultural ideologies of motherhood define the nature of mother love. Recent developments in motherhood studies, and the work of a small number of feminist philosophers and scholars of motherhood, have challenged the tenets of these ideologies by daring to speak the “unspeakable”: that mother love is often and for all mothers, whether consciously or not, permeated by powerful negative and conflicting emotions termed maternal ambivalence. In this essay, relying on recorded personal narratives by Bosnian women who are raising children (...)
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  19.  4
    Loving From Below: Of Colonial Love and Other Demons.Ureña Carolyn - 2017 - Hypatia 32 (1):86-102.
    This article explores the implications of adopting decolonial love as a theoretical and practical model for healing the wounds of coloniality by contrasting its revolutionary potential to the damaging effects of its opposite, colonial love. The latter, based in an imperialist, dualist logic, dangerously fetishizes the beloved object and participates in the oppression and subjugation of difference. Decolonial feminist theorist Chela Sandoval's concept of decolonial love, by contrast, originates “from below” and operates between those rendered other by hegemonic forces. In (...)
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  20. Collective Love as Public Freedom: Dancing Resistance. Ehrenreich, Arendt, Kristeva, and Idle No More.Allison Weir - 2017 - Hypatia 32 (1):19-34.
    In the Indigenous resistance movement that came to be known as “Idle No More,” round dances played a central role. From the beginning of the movement in western Canada in the winter of 2012–13, and as it spread across Turtle Island and throughout the world, round dances served to bring together Indigenous and non-Indigenous activists with people in the streets. “At almost every event, we collectively embodied our diverse and ancient traditions in the round dance by taking the movement to (...)
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