44 found

Year:

  1.  2
    Lucretia and the Impossibility of Female Republicanism in Margaret Cavendish's Sociable Letters.Sandrine Bergès - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (4):663-680.
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  2.  1
    The Hidden Labors of Mary Mottley, Madame de Tocqueville.Ross Carroll - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (4):643-662.
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  3.  1
    “Mere Auxiliaries to the Movement”: How Intellectual Biography Obscures Marx's and Engels's Gendered Political Partnerships.Terrell Carver - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (4):593-609.
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  4.  12
    Gender and the “Great Man”: Recovering Philosophy's “Wives of the Canon”.Jennifer Forestal & Menaka Philips - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (4):587-592.
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  5.  1
    The “Bio” Politics of Matter and Mattering for Feminist Engagements with Biosocial, Biocultural, and Posthuman Embodiment.Kelly Fritsch - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (4):717-725.
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  6.  17
    Is the Lack of Women in Philosophy a Universal Phenomenon? Exploring Women's Representation in Greek Departments of Philosophy.Simoni Iliadi, Kostas Theologou & Spyridon Stelios - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (4):700-716.
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  7.  2
    Survivors, Liars, and Unfit Minds: Rhetorical Impossibility and Rape Trauma Disclosure.Stephanie R. Larson - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (4):681-699.
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  8.  2
    The “Beloved and Deplored” Memory of Harriet Taylor Mill: Rethinking Gender and Intellectual Labor in the Canon.Menaka Philips - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (4):626-642.
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  9.  2
    Xanthippe: Shrew or Muse.Arlene Saxonhouse - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (4):610-625.
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  10.  10
    Domesticating Bodies: The Role of Shame in Obstetric Violence.Sara Cohen Shabot & Keshet Korem - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (3):384-401.
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  11.  13
    Gender, Shame, and the Pantsuit.Mary Edwards - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (3):571-577.
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  12.  9
    Gender and the Politics of Shame: A Twenty‐First‐Century Feminist Shame Theory.Clara Fischer - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (3):371-383.
    This special issue explores the relevance of shame to feminist theory and practice. Across a number of contexts, theoretical frames, and disciplines, the articles collated here provide a stimulating engagement with shame, posing questions and developing analyses that have a direct bearing on feminism. For, the significance of shame to feminists lies in the complex and often troubling implications it holds as a feeling that may be experienced differently by people of certain genders (and none), and in its relation to (...)
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  13.  4
    Shatter Not the Branches of the Tree of Anger: Mothering, Affect, and Disability.Susan L. Gabel - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (3):553-568.
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  14.  2
    “The Most Naked Phase of Our Struggle”: Gendered Shaming and Masculinist Desiring‐Production in Turkey's War on Terror.Fulden İbrahimhakkıoğlu - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (3):418-433.
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  15.  8
    Free Lunch with the Stench Wench: Toward a Synaesthetics of Poverty and Shame in Catherine Hoffmann's Performance.Alexandra Kokoli - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (3):485-499.
    Catherine Hoffmann's Free Lunch with the Stench Wench is a performance of abjection and self-abjection through poverty with an apotropaic aspiration: to shed the shame through sharing, and to create opportunities for a common social subjectivity that refuses to be silent about the struggle of its own creation and maintenance. Despite its title, Free Lunch does not come with a free lunch for the audience but creates an olfactory situation, through the onstage cooking of hot chocolate and the presence of (...)
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  16.  2
    Too Shame to Look: Learning to Trust Mirrors and Healing the Lived Experience of Shame in Alice Walker's The Color Purple.Kimberly S. Love - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (3):521-536.
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  17.  6
    Femininity, Shame, and Redemption.Bonnie Mann - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (3):402-417.
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  18. “Everything Being Tangled Up in Every Other Thing”: Class, Desire, and Shame in Michelle Tea's The Passionate Mistakes and Intricate Corruption of One Girl in America.Emma McKenna - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (3):469-484.
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  19.  6
    And Stigma Followed Me Everywhere.Nita Mishra - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (3):569-570.
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  20.  5
    Sunsets and Solidarity: Overcoming Sacramental Shame in Conservative Christian Churches to Forge a Queer Vision of Love and Justice.Dawne Moon & Theresa W. Tobin - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (3):451-468.
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  21.  7
    “I Longed to Cherish Mirrored Reflections”: Mirroring and Black Female Subjectivity in Carrie Mae Weems's Art Against Shame.Robert R. Shane - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (3):500-520.
    Through staged photographs in which she herself is often the lead actor or through appropriation of historical photographs, contemporary African American artist Carrie Mae Weems deconstructs the shaming of the black female body in American visual culture and offers counter-hegemonic images of black female beauty. The mirror has been foundational in Western theories of subjectivity and discussions of beauty. In the artworks I analyze in this article, Weems tactically employs the mirror to engage the topos of shame in order to (...)
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  22.  7
    Humiliation as a Harm of Sexual Violence: Feminist Versus Neoliberal Perspectives.Dianna Taylor - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (3):434-450.
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  23.  8
    The Shame of Shamelessness.Gail Weiss - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (3):537-552.
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  24.  7
    Foreigners and Inclusion in Academia.Saray Ayala‐López - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (2):325-342.
    This article discusses the category of foreigner in the context of academia. In the first part I explore this category and its philosophical significance. A quick look at the literature reveals that this category needs more attention in analyses of dimensions of privilege and disadvantage. Foreignness has peculiarities that demarcate it from other categories of identity, and it intersects with them in complicated ways. Devoting more attention to it would enable addressing issues affecting foreigners in academia that go commonly unnoticed. (...)
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  25.  2
    Anne‐Thérèse de Lambert on Aging and Self‐Esteem.Andreas Blank - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (2):289-304.
    This article studies Madame de Lambert's early eighteenth-century views on aging, and especially the aging of women, by contextualizing them in a twofold way: It understands them as a response to La Rochefoucauld's skepticism concerning aging, women, and the aging of women; It understands them as being closely connected to a long series of scattered remarks concerning esteem, self-esteem, and honnêteté in Lambert's moral essays. Whereas La Rochefoucauld describes aging as a decline of intellectual, emotional, and physical powers and is (...)
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  26.  6
    Sexual Difference and Decolonization: Oyĕwùmí and Irigaray in Dialogue About Western Culture.Azille Coetzee & Annemie Halsema - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (2):178-194.
    In this article we aim to show the potential of cross-continental dialogues for a decolonizing feminism. We relate the work of one of the major critics of the Western metaphysical patriarchal order, Luce Irigaray, to the critique of the colonial/modern gender system by the Nigerian feminist scholar Oyĕrónké Oyĕwùmí. Oyĕwùmí's work is often rejected based on the argument that it is empirically wrong. We start by problematizing this line of thinking by providing an epistemological interpretation of Oyĕwùmí's claims. We then (...)
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  27.  24
    Being a Foreigner in Philosophy: A Taxonomy.Verena Erlenbusch - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (2):307-324.
    The question of diversity, both with regard to the demographic profile of philosophers as well as the content of philosophical inquiry, has received much attention in recent years. One figure that has gone relatively unnoticed is that of the foreigner. To the extent that philosophers have taken the foreigner as their object of inquiry, they have focused largely on challenges nonnative speakers of English face in a profession conducted predominantly in English. Yet an understanding of the foreigner in terms of (...)
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  28.  23
    Islamist Women's Agency and Relational Autonomy.Ranjoo Seodu Herr - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (2):195-215.
    Mainstream conceptions of autonomy have been surreptitiously gender-specific and masculinist. Feminist philosophers have reclaimed autonomy as a feminist value, while retaining its core ideal as self-government, by reconceptualizing it as “relational autonomy.” This article examines whether feminist theories of relational autonomy can adequately illuminate the agency of Islamist women who defend their nonliberal religious values and practices and assiduously attempt to enact them in their daily lives. I focus on two notable feminist theories of relational autonomy advanced by Marina Oshana (...)
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  29.  2
    Feminism, Capitalism, and Ecology.Johanna Oksala - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (2):216-234.
    This article critically assesses the different ways of theoretically connecting feminism, capitalism, and ecology. I take the existing tradition of socialist ecofeminism as my starting point and outline two different ways that the connections among capitalism, the subordination of women, and the destruction of the environment have been made in this literature: materialist ecofeminism and Marxist ecofeminism. I will demonstrate the political and theoretical advantages of these positions in comparison to some of the earlier forms of theorizing the relationship between (...)
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  30.  9
    Woman‐Hating: On Misogyny, Sexism, and Hate Speech.Louise Richardson‐Self - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (2):256-272.
    Hate speech is one of the most important conceptual categories in anti-oppression politics today; a great deal of energy and political will is devoted to identifying, characterizing, contesting, and penalizing hate speech. However, despite the increasing inclusion of gender identity as a socially salient trait, antipatriarchal politics has largely been absent within this body of scholarship. Figuring out how to properly situate patriarchy-enforcing speech within the category of hate speech is therefore an important politico-philosophical project. My aim in this article (...)
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  31.  14
    Woman‐Hating: On Misogyny, Sexism, and Hate Speech.Louise Richardson‐Self - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (2):256-272.
    Hate speech is one of the most important conceptual categories in anti-oppression politics today; a great deal of energy and political will is devoted to identifying, characterizing, contesting, and penalizing hate speech. However, despite the increasing inclusion of gender identity as a socially salient trait, antipatriarchal politics has largely been absent within this body of scholarship. Figuring out how to properly situate patriarchy-enforcing speech within the category of hate speech is therefore an important politico-philosophical project. My aim in this article (...)
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  32.  1
    Resisting the Logic of Ambivalence: Bad Faith as Subversive, Anticolonial Practice.Kris Sealey - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (2):163-177.
    This article critiques Homi Bhabha's proposal that mimicry, as a transgressive performance of ambivalence, disrupts the colonial violence of the stereotype, and as such, generates emancipatory conditions for postcolonial subjects. I am critical of this naming of mimicry as enabling a possible liberation from colonial violence not only because it fails to address the loss of belonging that significantly marks the experience of being so violated, but also because it seems to intensify this loss in the hybridity and fragmentation that (...)
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  33.  6
    Natality or Birth? Arendt and Cavarero on the Human Condition of Being Born.Fanny Söderbäck - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (2):273-288.
    This essay offers a critical analysis of Hannah Arendt's notion of natality through the lens of Adriana Cavarero's feminist philosophy of birth. First, I argue that the strength of Arendtian natality is its rootedness in an ontology of uniqueness, and a commitment to human plurality and relationality. Next, I trace with Cavarero three critical concerns regarding Arendtian natality, namely that it is curiously abstract; problematically disembodied and sexually neutral; and dependent on a model of vulnerability that assumes equality rather than (...)
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  34.  16
    Foreigners in Philosophy and Openness to Dislocation.Elİf Yavnık - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (2):343-358.
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  35.  10
    Precarity is a Feminist Issue: Gender and Contingent Labor in the Academy.Robin Zheng - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (2):235-255.
    Feminist philosophers have challenged a wide range of gender injustices in professional philosophy. However, the problem of precarity, that is, the increasing numbers of contingent faculty who cannot find permanent employment, has received scarcely any attention. What explains this oversight? In this article, I argue, first, that academics are held in the grips of an ideology that diverts attention away from the structural conditions of precarity, and second, that the gendered dimensions of such an ideology have been overlooked. To do (...)
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  36.  16
    Self‐Esteem and Ethics: A Phenomenological View.Anna Bortolan - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (1):56-72.
    This paper aims to provide an account of the relationship between self-esteem and moral experience. In particular, drawing on feminist and phenomenological accounts of affectivity and ethics, I argue that self-esteem has a primary role in moral epistemology and moral action. I start by providing a characterization of self-esteem, suggesting in particular that it can be best understood through the phenomenological notion of “existential feeling.” Examining the dynamics characteristic of the so-called “impostor phenomenon” and the experience of women who are (...)
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  37.  13
    Gender as Lived Time: Reading The Second Sex for a Feminist Phenomenology of Temporality.Megan M. Burke - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (1):111-127.
    This article suggests that Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex offers an important contribution to a feminist phenomenology of temporality. In contrast to readings of The Second Sex that focus on the notion of “becoming” as the main claim about the relation between “woman” and time, this article suggests that Beauvoir's discussion of temporality in volume II of The Second Sex shows that Beauvoir understands the temporality of waiting, or a passive present, to be an underlying structure of women's existence (...)
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  38.  49
    On Microaggressions: Cumulative Harm and Individual Responsibility.Christina Friedlaender - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (1):5-21.
    Microaggressions are a new moral category that refers to the subtle yet harmful forms of discriminatory behavior experienced by members of oppressed groups. Such behavior often results from implicit bias, leaving individual perpetrators unaware of the harm they have caused. Moreover, microaggressions are often dismissed on the grounds that they do not constitute a real or morally significant harm. My goal is therefore to explain why microaggressions are morally significant and argue that we are responsible for their harms. I offer (...)
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  39.  30
    Hermeneutical Dissent and the Species of Hermeneutical Injustice.Trystan S. Goetze - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (1):73-90.
    According to Miranda Fricker, a hermeneutical injustice occurs when there is a deficit in our shared tools of social interpretation, such that marginalized social groups are at a disadvantage in making sense of their distinctive and important experiences. Critics have claimed that Fricker's account ignores or precludes a phenomenon I call hermeneutical dissent, where marginalized groups have produced their own interpretive tools for making sense of those experiences. I clarify the nature of hermeneutical injustice to make room for hermeneutical dissent, (...)
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  40.  13
    Eudaimonism, Human Nature, and the Burdened Virtues.Celeste Harvey - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (1):40-55.
    This article explores the prospects for a eudaimonist moral theory that is both feminist and Aristotelian. Making the moral philosophy developed by Aristotle compatible with a feminist moral perspective presents a number of philosophical challenges. Lisa Tessman offers one of the most sustained feminist engagements with Aristotelian eudaimonism. However, in arguing for the account of flourishing that her eudaimonist theory invokes, Tessman avoids taking a stand either for or against the role Aristotle assigned to human nature. She draws her account (...)
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  41.  62
    Misreading Nonmonogamy in Beauvoir's She Came to Stay.Jessica Kean - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (1):128-143.
    Simone de Beauvoir's novel She Came to Stay follows Françoise and her partner Pierre as their intimacy becomes increasingly entangled with the young and tempestuous Xavière. Many readings of the novel explain Françoise's bad feeling and eventual violence as symptoms of sexual jealousy. The book has also been read as a veiled autobiography of Beauvoir and Sartre's similar entanglement with Olga Kosakiewicz, so that, very often, Françoise's jealousy is assumed to stand in for Beauvoir's own. This article is about misreading (...)
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  42.  12
    The Paternalistic Argument Against Abortion.Itzel Mayans & Moisés Vaca - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (1):22-39.
    A dominant trend in the philosophical literature on abortion has been concerned with the question of whether the fetus has moral status and how such a status might or might not conflict with women's liberties. However, a new and powerful trend against abortion requires philosophical examination. We refer to this trend as the paternalistic argument. In a nutshell, this argument holds that, insofar as motherhood is a constitutive end of women's well-being, abortion harms women; thus, abortion is wrong and should (...)
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  43.  5
    Beauvoir on the Lived Experience of Politics, Time, and Sex.Margaret A. Simons - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (1):91-93.
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  44.  3
    Reading the Lives of Others: Biography as Political Thought in Hannah Arendt and Simone de Beauvoir.Verónica Zebadúa Yáñez - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (1):94-110.
    In this essay, I focus on two biographical works by Hannah Arendt and Simone de Beauvoir that I read as political texts: Rahel Varnhagen: The Life of a Jewess and “Must We Burn Sade?”. Reading Arendt's Varnhagen and Beauvoir's “Sade” side by side illuminates their shared preoccupation with lived experience and their common political premises: the antagonism between freedom and sovereignty, and the centrality of action and constructive relations with others. My argument is that these texts constitute an original style (...)
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