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  1.  19
    Rethinking Affirmative Action: Problematising the “Least Privileged”.Bhagat Oinam - 2024 - Journal of the Indian Council of Philosophical Research 41 (2):225-240.
    Affirmative action as a state policy is one of the powerful ways of empowering the underprivileged in the society. While such a policy is aimed at lifting the economic and social condition of the underprivileged, this comes with acts that are discriminatory and exclusionary. Yet these acts are termed as positive discrimination. Certain sections of the society are excluded from having access to economic resources and opportunities, while these privileges are earmarked for another section of the society considered marginalized and (...)
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  2.  42
    Placing Mind in the Natural World: In Search of an Alternative Naturalism.Manoj Kumar Panda - 2024 - Journal of the Indian Council of Philosophical Research 41 (2):317-338.
    In contemporary philosophy, various attempts have been made in relation to placing our minds or mental states in the natural world or nature. In this context, there is a clear divide between naturalism and anti-naturalism, materialism and immaterialism, etc. Driven by the influence of naturalistic turn in philosophy and scientism, many philosophers have tried to put forth various naturalistic accounts of the relationship between mind and natural world. However, many of these accounts are naturalistic based on the modern scientific conception (...)
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  3.  19
    Swami Vivekananda: An Epitome of Nationalism.Lakshman Patra - 2024 - Journal of the Indian Council of Philosophical Research 41 (2):297-315.
    What we understand by nationalism is the idea of supporting one’s country, people, culture and sovereignty of the nation. It believes in self-rule, with an objective to maintain the national unity and solidarity. It also encourages pride in national achievements and is closely linked with patriotism. One who dedicates his life to promoting the above objectives for the glory of his nation is considered as a nationalist. Swami Vivekananda who has dedicated his short, but meaningful life for the upliftment of (...)
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  4.  4
    Identity, Difference and Diversity: A Journey from the Bṛhadāraṇyaka-Upaniṣad to Mukund Lath.Daniel Raveh - 2024 - Journal of the Indian Council of Philosophical Research 41 (2):139-153.
    In this paper, I offer a close comparative reading of a creation myth from chapter 1 of the Bṛhadāraṇyaka-Upaniṣad, which opens with the startling statement “ātmaivedam agra āsīt”, “in the beginning there was the self (ātman)”. I read this classical text with Śaṅkara, its foremost commentator, in dialogue with an ensemble of Indologists (Wilhelm Halbfass, Greg Bailey and Frederick Smith) and theorists (Walter Benjamin, Ramchandra Gandhi and Hélène Cixous), and vis-à-vis, the creation myth narrated in chapter 1 of the Book (...)
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  5.  8
    Āsakti.Gitanjali Roy - 2024 - Journal of the Indian Council of Philosophical Research 41 (2):205-209.
    Āsakti has its roots in the ancient Indian knowledge system. It precipitates the concept of attachment in the Indian perspective. The following paper explores the psychological perspective of āsakti from the Shrimad Bhagavad Gita while maintaining its philosophical purpose and nature. Āsakti hinders the path of self-realization; hence, from the psycho-philosophical lens, its inquiry with scientific understanding is important for spiritual growth. Āsakti can be understood as a river with five tributaries. Each tributary branches out of the river as an (...)
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  6.  1
    The Date of Ādi Śaṅkarācārya and Emergence of Śaivism as a Popular Religion in South India.R. Saraswati Sainath - 2024 - Journal of the Indian Council of Philosophical Research 41 (2):155-204.
    The date of Ādi Śaṅkarācārya has been one of the unsolved problems of Indian Philosophy. He is generally accepted to have lived from 788 to 820 CE and is thus assigned from the end of the eighth century to the beginning of the ninth century. So far scholars who have worked on this problem have consulted his hagiographies and his works to determine his date. However, they have not studied the date of Ādi Śaṅkarācārya by placing him in the context (...)
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  7.  14
    Sri Aurobindo: Cosmology, Psychology and Integral Experience.Bhawani Shankar - 2024 - Journal of the Indian Council of Philosophical Research 41 (2):241-258.
    Sri Aurobindo is one of the most prominent figures in the Indian Philosophy of twentieth century and yet we barely find any mention of his work in the philosophy circles. He has written extensively on metaphysics, aesthetics, and ethics. Sri Aurobindo’s work is all-encompassing and carries marks of a deep yogic insight into both the individual self (with all its parts and their integrated working) and the universe that ultimately shares a relation of identity with the individual in secret. He (...)
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  8.  22
    Buddhist Moral Teachings is not Virtue Ethics: A Critical Response to Damien Keown’s View.Ali Sharaf - 2024 - Journal of the Indian Council of Philosophical Research 41 (2):211-224.
    In the Buddhist tradition, there is an expansive collection of texts that explore the topic of ethics, addressing moral questions concerning the right and wrong behaviors, virtues, vices, and so forth. However, when examining the main texts of this tradition, we find an absence of a structured moral philosophy that systematically and critically analyzes moral values and principles. Therefore, Buddhist scholars have responded in different ways to the perplexing situation in which Buddhism largely lacks an explicit theory in moral philosophy. (...)
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  9.  9
    Pritchard on Veritism and Trivial Truths.Anumita Shukla & Mayank Bora - 2024 - Journal of the Indian Council of Philosophical Research 41 (2):273-295.
    Proponents of Veritism believe that truth is the sole non-instrumental epistemic good. This view is often taken to entail that all truths should be of equal epistemic value. Hence, it is put under stress by the presence of trivial truths: truths to which we attach relatively little or no epistemic value. Pritchard, in the defense of Veritism, has tried to argue that the best way to understand the implications of Veritism is to think in terms of how an intellectually virtuous (...)
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  10.  4
    Berkeley’s Theory of Perception: Searle Versus Pappas.S. Sreenish - 2024 - Journal of the Indian Council of Philosophical Research 41 (2):259-272.
    In Seeing Things as They Are (Searle 2015), Searle developed a direct realist’s theory of perception. According to direct realism, physical objects are directly and immediately perceived. Searle claims that Berkeley’s theory of perception goes against direct realism. For Searle, Berkeley’s theory suggests that only subjective experiences (ideas) are directly and immediately perceived, not physical objects. Contrary to Searle, G. S. Pappas claims that Berkeley’s theory of perception is consistent with the view that physical objects are immediately perceivable (Pappas 1982; (...)
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  11.  49
    Evolutionary Ethics: Understanding its Transition.Ikbal Hussain Ahmed - 2024 - Journal of the Indian Council of Philosophical Research 41 (1):63-82.
    This paper offers a descriptive account of the transition in evolutionary ethics with reference to some major works from ethics, sociobiology, moral psychology, and primatology. The causes and nature of the transition are discussed by making a distinction between traditional and recent trends in evolutionary ethics enabling us to understand the significance of contemporary evolutionary ethics. The study is gradually directed toward a crucial question of ethics that is the place of reason in morality and what evolutionary ethics implies for (...)
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  12.  7
    Bildung as Cultural Participation: The Prereflective and Reflective Self in Hegel’s Phenomenology.Nisar Alungal Chungath - 2024 - Journal of the Indian Council of Philosophical Research 41 (1):117-138.
    Contemporary poststructural and hermeneutical theories emphasize the prereflective opacity of the self and the consequent inarticulateness concerning the deep prereflective layers (‘prejudices’) of self-understanding. Some of such ontologically significant prejudices, some hermeneutical views hold, are inescapable and so the self cannot reflectively refuse or overcome them. This paper proposes the Hegelian notion of self-consciousness in the Phenomenology as the restless, unreflective–reflective negation of its own nothingness or contingent, open givenness as an alternative that both accepts the hermeneutical insight concerning the (...)
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  13.  4
    Michael Bratman: The Notion of Shared Agency in Meshing Sub-plans.Lizashree Hazarika - 2024 - Journal of the Indian Council of Philosophical Research 41 (1):83-92.
    This paper focuses on one of the major controversies of collective action, i.e. Shared Agency. The objective of my paper is to explain the relevance of Shared Agency in the Theory of Collective Action where I have dealt with questions like—Is it possible to consider one as an agent or as the same agent when she performs in a shared action? How can we talk of shared agency, even when an action is being performed by different individuals in a group (...)
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  14.  12
    A Critical Analysis of Dignāga’s Refutation of Non-Buddhist Schools Theory of Perception.Bhima Kumar Kukkamalla - 2024 - Journal of the Indian Council of Philosophical Research 41 (1):1-16.
    Among the means of valid cognition, the one which appears first in every enumeration, which was considered as being the basis of all other means of knowledge and which was considered as a legitimate method of knowledge by all schools of Indian thought is perception (pratyakṣa). With regard to perception, we can naturally expect such questions as ‘what is it to perceive’ or ‘what do we mean when we say that something is perceived’. It is generally believed that the philosophical (...)
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  15.  7
    Does Fate Hinder Freedom? A philosophical Praxis.Javid Ahmad Mallah - 2024 - Journal of the Indian Council of Philosophical Research 41 (1):37-61.
    Ideas such as “I am born a labor, poor, a hereditary syphilitic/unhandy” are ones that people tend to resort to as excuses when they feel as if the odds of life are stacked against them and characterized it either “fate” or punishment. In every life situation, an individual finds a choice. In the contemporary world, human life faces boundary situations (COVID) and messy lived experiences such as paralysis, which have different consequences for different people. However, life seems more difficult for (...)
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  16.  15
    From Solipsism to the Limits of Experience: A Reflection in the Light of Wittgenstein’s TLP.Rajakishore Nath & Mamata Manjari Panda - 2024 - Journal of the Indian Council of Philosophical Research 41 (1):17-36.
    In this paper, we will discuss solipsism and the limits of experience in the light of Wittgenstein’s TLP. One cannot draw the limits of experience without bringing in the notion of the experiencer. That is to say, the notion of self is very relevant to the discussion on the limits of experience. Solipsism means that ‘I’ is the only reality, and what I experience is all that I could know. We will focus on solipsism from two points of view, the (...)
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  17.  11
    The Criterion of Legitimacy in a Government: Analysing Ian Shapiro’s Concept of Representative Democracy.Neetika Singh - 2024 - Journal of the Indian Council of Philosophical Research 41 (1):103-116.
    Ian Shapiro proposes a representative government that bases its understanding of truth on mature enlightenment philosophy. He examines various enlightenment and anti-enlightenment theories to substantiate his arguments in favour of verifiability as the criterion for defining truth. Contending such a concept of truth he specifies that it is possible only within a representative democracy as it can systematically undermine socially built readymade systems. To examine Shapiro’s fallibilist approach to truth, this paper critically analyses his concept of truth-telling for legitimizing a (...)
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  18.  14
    Emotions and Mahābhārata: A Phenomenological Study of Yudhiṣṭhira’s Grief in Śānti Parva.Saurabh Todariya - 2024 - Journal of the Indian Council of Philosophical Research 41 (1):93-102.
    The complexity and fluidity of emotions in the epic of Mahābhārata present before us an interesting case for delving into the phenomenology of emotions. In the rationalist tradition of Kant, emotions are considered as an impediment to moral discernment. The rationalist account of emotions considers it as an animal instinct which needs to be controlled through the exercise of Reason. The paper problematizes the rationalist interpretation of emotions mainly on two counts. First, it ignores the evaluative content of the emotions (...)
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