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  1.  2
    Nicholas of Cusa’s Maximum as a Renaissance Precursor to Hegel’s True Infinity.Thora Ilin Bayer - 2015 - Idealistic Studies 45 (3):339-354.
  2.  2
    A Kantian Account of the Knowledge of Life and the Life Sciences.Juan Manual Garrido Wainer - 2015 - Idealistic Studies 45 (3):355-379.
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  3.  2
    On the Fundamental Dissimilarity of Aristotelian and Kantian Time Concepts.Chelsea C. Harry - 2015 - Idealistic Studies 45 (3):329-338.
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  4. Berkeley's Unseen Horse and Coach.Dale Jacquette - 2015 - Idealistic Studies 45 (3):247-264.
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  5.  3
    Hegel on Sovereignty and Monarchy.Philip J. Kain - 2015 - Idealistic Studies 45 (3):265-277.
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  6.  14
    The Synthetic Unity of Apperception in Hegel's Logic of the Concept.Gregory S. Moss - 2015 - Idealistic Studies 45 (3):279-306.
  7.  1
    German Idealism as Post-Kantianism.Sebastian Ostritsch - 2015 - Idealistic Studies 45 (3):307-327.
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  8.  5
    Unconditioned by the Other.Mark Cauchi - 2015 - Idealistic Studies 45 (2):125-147.
    Much philosophy of the last few decades has witnessed a turn toward otherness and a corresponding calling into question of the autonomy of the agent. In my paper I attempt to re-conceive what agency is in light of this emphasis placed on otherness. I undertake this reconsideration through an analysis of the concepts of unconditionality in Kant and of conditioning by the other in Levinas. Through these analyses I arrive at a new concept: the unconditioning of the agent by the (...)
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  9.  4
    Freedom for Letting-Become.Sanja Dejanovic - 2015 - Idealistic Studies 45 (2):191-213.
    In his treatise on the essence of human freedom, Schelling recognizes that any true philosophical articulation must begin with the experience of freedom. If freedom as he tells us is the center with respect to which the grounding of all beings emerges, then, the relationship of the human and non-human, along with their taken for granted distinction, must be thought in light of the question of freedom. If such an orientation is to be made within Schelling’s philosophy, the central aspect (...)
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  10.  10
    The Embodied Reminder of Death.Merve Ertene - 2015 - Idealistic Studies 45 (2):215-228.
    When one attempts to understand and grasp the seemingly simple fact of pain within the realm of human being, it may be inevitable for one to be caught by the question “why do I suffer from pain?” This question, like every other “why” question, belongs to a basic human attitude which cannot accept what is as it is. Considering pain as a manifestation of such an attitude is also determining it as intolerable and reading the experience of pain as an (...)
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  11.  7
    Is Judea, Then, the Teutons’ Fatherland?Christopher Fox - 2015 - Idealistic Studies 45 (2):229-246.
    I read Tacitus’s valorizing of the Germani in Germania and his depiction of Jews in the Annals and Histories as sources of post-medieval Germany’s identity crisis. Tacitus compares German and Jewish sexuality, marriage, morality, religion, superstition, and women. Most importantly, he devises contrasting German and Jewish models of freedom that prefigure this concept’s development in Kantian and Post-Kantian philosophy. This leads to a paradox: although Tacitus denounces Jews for what he praises in the Germani, he admires Jewish anti-idolatry and freedom. (...)
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  12.  4
    Editor's Preface.Gary E. Overvold - 2015 - Idealistic Studies 45 (2):5-5.
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  13.  7
    Schelling and Freud on Historicity and Freedom.Gilad Sharvit - 2015 - Idealistic Studies 45 (2):149-167.
    This article suggests a rereading of Schelling’s theory of freedom in the through Freud’s psychoanalytic theory. Schelling’s philosophy of freedom manifested a latent essentialism of the idealistic formulation of human freedom. In Schelling’s scheme, free was “what acts only in accord with the laws of its own being.” In practice, Schelling theory of freedom was based on an intelligible act in the “beginning of creation” which set an eternal unreachable essence to the subject. I propose to read “Schelling through Freud” (...)
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  14.  4
    Cassirer's Functional Conception of the Human Being.Simon Truwant - 2015 - Idealistic Studies 45 (2):169-189.
    Since the publication of The Metaphysics of Symbolic Forms, scholars have insisted that Cassirer’s account of human consciousness can only be found in this posthumous ‘fourth volume of the philosophy of symbolic forms.’ I will argue, however, that Cassirer’s philosophy of culture was already from the beginning essentially also a philosophy of the human being: as I see it, Cassirer consistently holds a ‘functional conception of human consciousness’ that can serve as a foundational element of his thought precisely by remaining (...)
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  15. Varieties of Transcendental Idealism: Kant and Heidegger Thinking Beyond Life.G. Anthony Bruno - 2015 - Idealistic Studies 45 (1).
    In recent work, William Blattner claims that Heidegger is an empirical realist, but not a transcendental idealist. Blattner argues that, unlike Kant, Heidegger holds that thinking beyond human life warrants no judgment about nature's existence. This poses two problems. One is interpretive: Blattner misreads Kant's conception of the beyond-life as yielding the judgment that nature does not exist, for Kant shares Heidegger's view that such a judgment must lack sense. Another is programmatic: Blattner overstates the gap between Kant's and Heidegger's (...)
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  16.  19
    Varieties of Transcendental Idealism in Advance.G. Anthony Bruno - 2015 - Idealistic Studies 45 (1).
    In recent work, William Blattner claims that Heidegger is an empirical realist, but not a transcendental idealist. Blattner argues that, unlike Kant, Heidegger holds that thinking beyond human life warrants no judgment about nature's existence. This poses two problems. One is interpretive: Blattner misreads Kant's conception of the beyond-life as yielding the judgment that nature does not exist, for Kant shares Heidegger's view that such a judgment must lack sense. Another is programmatic: Blattner overstates the gap between Kant's and Heidegger's (...)
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