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  1. The Aesthetics of Agency in Kant and Schiller.Antón Barba-Kay - 2016 - Idealistic Studies 46 (3):259-275.
    One of the lasting influences of German Idealism has been the transformation of aesthetics into a central philosophical concern. My aim here is to show how and why Kant’s and Schiller’s formulations of the problems of moral agency, in particular, constitute an important episode of this development. I argue, first, that it is in the context of Kant’s view of moral agency that aesthetics gains larger purchase than it formerly had ; second, that Schiller expands the role of aesthetics by (...)
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  2. Playing with Others.Karen E. Davis - 2016 - Idealistic Studies 46 (3):301-322.
    Scholars of hermeneutics have recently taken up the task of elucidating Gadamer’s ethics by studying his work on the structure of understanding and human experience. This article seeks to contribute to that scholarship through an examination of Gadamer’s aesthetics. I suggest that Gadamer’s notions of play and aesthetic non-differentiation provide further resources for understanding Gadamer’s hermeneutic ethics as an ethics of non-differentiation, i.e., a unification of theory and practice. For Gadamer, an understanding of the good is its enactment in the (...)
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  3.  1
    Hegel’s Bathetic Sublime.Martin Donougho - 2016 - Idealistic Studies 46 (3):217-236.
    Little attention has been paid to Hegel’s version of the sublime. I argue that the sublime plays a very marginal role in the Berlin lectures on aesthetics and on religion; in particular, Hegel ignores the “Romantic” sublime popular among his contemporaries. The sublime he locates in Persian poetry and more properly in Biblical Psalmody. After surveying his various articulations of the sublime, I turn to Hegel’s careful analysis of how the Psalms achieve their peculiar effects and note his focus on (...)
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  4.  1
    Reconciling the Phenomenology and Metaphysics of Value.Tsarina Doyle - 2016 - Idealistic Studies 46 (3):277-300.
    This paper aims to reconcile the phenomenology and metaphysics of value by proposing a cognitivist and metaphysically committed account of evaluation and value inspired, in part, by the phenomenological arguments of J. N. Findlay in relation to value. By the phenomenology of value I mean the affective—commendatory—character of evaluations such as when I describe something as good or bad, worthwhile or not worthwhile. Whilst this—subjective—aspect of evaluation is largely uncontested, there is much disagreement about the cognitive and metaphysical status of (...)
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  5. Death and the Transcendental Subject.Sami J. Pihlström - 2016 - Idealistic Studies 46 (3):323-339.
    This paper discusses the philosophy of death and mortality from a transcendental perspective. I first criticize the metaphysically realistic background assumptions of mainstream analytic approaches to the philosophy of death. Secondly, I defend a transcendentally idealistic approach, drawing attention to how the topic of death can be illuminated by means of the notion of the transcendental subject. Thirdly, I identify a problem in this approach: the transcendental subject needs to recognize its own mortality. Fourthly, I propose a pragmatist way out (...)
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  6.  3
    The Idealistic Metaphysics of Abstract Objects.Nicholas Rescher - 2016 - Idealistic Studies 46 (3):215-216.
    It is maintained that abstract objects are literally entia rationis: their being lies in being conceived and their nature is inextricably entangled with the operation of minds.
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  7.  4
    Education as "Absolute Transition" in Hegel’s Philosophy of Right.Kelly M. S. Swope - 2016 - Idealistic Studies 46 (3):237-258.
    G. W. F. Hegel’s Elements of Philosophy of Right analogizes the unfolding of a people’s political self-consciousness to the unfolding of an education. Yet Hegel is somewhat unsystematic in accounting for how the process of political education unfolds in its differentiated moments. This paper pieces together a more systematic account of political education from Hegel’s scattered remarks on the subject in Philosophy of Right. I argue that, once we understand how political education fits into the holistic picture of Hegel’s Rechtsphilosophie, (...)
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  8.  5
    Aristotle and Heidegger.Nahum Brown - 2016 - Idealistic Studies 46 (2):199-214.
    Aristotle claims in book 9 of the Metaphysics that potentiality is distinct from actuality yet also that potentiality exists only for the sake of actuality. This essay presents the relationship between potentiality’s existence and actuality’s priority as an aporia, where potentiality remains distinct from and exists in excess of actuality, even though it exists only as actuality. I claim that this aporia helps the early Heidegger of Being and Time to conclude, contrary to Aristotle, that potentiality stands higher than actuality.
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  9.  1
    McDowell and Hegel.Igor Hanzel - 2016 - Idealistic Studies 46 (2):119-134.
    I shall compare John McDowell’s Mind and World with Hegel’s later philosophy in the Science of Logic and the Encyclopedia of Philosophical Sciences in Outline. I begin by presenting McDowell’s epistemology. I then delineate the most important aspects of Hegel’s epistemology and, because McDowell claims that he draws on Kant’s views on the relation between receptivity and spontaneity, their relation to Kant’s epistemology. Here, I suggest that even if Hegel’s epistemology displays idealistic features which determine the construction of the category-clusters (...)
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  10.  1
    The Phenomenological Function of Humor.Jennifer Marra - 2016 - Idealistic Studies 46 (2):135-161.
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  11.  2
    A Gestalt-Model of Zettel 608.Richard McDonough - 2016 - Idealistic Studies 46 (2):163-182.
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  12.  2
    A Gestalt-Model of Zettel 608.Richard McDonough - 2016 - Idealistic Studies 46 (2):163-182.
    Most scholars understand para. 608 of Zettel to suggest that language and thought might arise from chaos at the neural centre. However, this contradicts Wittgenstein’s signature view that the philosopher must not advance theories. The paper proposes an alternative model of Z608 based on the Austrian Gestalt-movement that influenced Wittgenstein. Z608 does not suggest that language and thought might arise from chaos in the brain but that they may arise in a different non-causal sense from the “chaos” of activities in (...)
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  13.  4
    Mathematical Conception of Husserl’s Phenomenology.Seung-Ug Park - 2016 - Idealistic Studies 46 (2):183-197.
    In this paper, I have attempted to make the role of mathematical thinking clear in Husserl’s theory of sciences. Husserl believed that phenomenology could afford to provide a safe foundation for individual sciences. Hence, the first task of the project was reorganizing the system of sciences and to show the possibility of apodictic knowledge regarding the world. Husserl was inspired by the progress of mathematics at that time because mathematics is the most logical discipline and deals with abstract objects. It (...)
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  14.  5
    Describing The Rationality of Human Experience in Advance.Joseph Carew - 2016 - Idealistic Studies 46 (1):79-96.
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  15.  3
    Describing The Rationality of Human Experience.Joseph Carew - 2016 - Idealistic Studies 46 (1):79-96.
    I argue that Hegel’s logic is an anthropology. Appealing to the fact that we, as the kind of beings we are, search for meaning in our sensory encounter with things and in our actions, it articulates the rationality that guides this search and explains the fundamental shape of human experience. This has three implications for his logic. First, since this rationality is first and foremost an instinctive activity, it is an elaboration of our unconscious knowledge of the rules of thinking. (...)
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  16.  2
    The Self as a Becoming Work of Art in Early Romantic Thought in Advance.Gerard Kuperus - 2016 - Idealistic Studies 46 (1):65-77.
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  17.  1
    The Self as a Becoming Work of Art in Early Romantic Thought.Gerard Kuperus - 2016 - Idealistic Studies 46 (1):65-77.
    For the Jena Romantics the idea of a self is always in a process, never fully completed. It develops itself as an acting I that interacts with the world, an ongoing interchange between what I am and what I am not. In order to grasp how the self develops and is educated, this paper compares this idea of the self to Schlegel’s account of irony. Both irony and the I exist as an ongoing process. In this comparison the self is (...)
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  18.  9
    Hegel and Arendt on a Key Term of Modernity in Advance.Tereza Matějčková - 2016 - Idealistic Studies 46 (1):19-40.
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  19.  6
    Hegel and Arendt on a Key Term of Modernity.Tereza Matějčková - 2016 - Idealistic Studies 46 (1):19-40.
    Since the early modern age, labor has gained centrality in both the social order and the conception of man. This study undertakes an attempt to evaluate this ascent by comparing the concept of labor in Hegel’s thought, as presented mainly in the Phenomenology of Spirit, with the conception of labor in the thought of Hannah Arendt. While Hegel linked labor closely to spirituality, Arendt argued that in the process of labor assimilating all human activities, man in fact forfeits spirituality. The (...)
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  20.  4
    On Kinds of Things and Cognitive Idealism in Advance.Nicholas Rescher - 2016 - Idealistic Studies 46 (1):1-17.
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  21.  1
    On Kinds of Things and Cognitive Idealism.Nicholas Rescher - 2016 - Idealistic Studies 46 (1):1-17.
    Whatever we can appropriately claim about reality has to be presented via a construct built from materials provided by our minds—our thought and deliberation—rather than something mandated unilaterally by reality itself. Our epistemic situation is such that neither reality alone and therefore rigorous realism nor yet our view of it has the entire story to itself. Their entanglement is such that in the end there has to be a negotiation that acknowledges their inseparable interlinkage in the constitution of our knowledge.
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  22.  7
    Experiments in Ethics?Martin Sticker - 2016 - Idealistic Studies 46 (1):41-64.
    I discuss two puzzling and neglected passages in the Critique of Practical Reason, namely, V:92 and V:163. In these passages Kant claims that practical philosophers should follow the paradigm of the chemist and conduct experiments on common human reason. I explain Kant’s conception of the chemical experiment, provide a detailed interpretation of the two passages in question, and conclude by applying the structure of the chemical experiment to the Analytic of the Critique of Practical Reason. Chemical experiments as a model (...)
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  23.  4
    Moral Theory and Moral Motivation in Dilthey’s Critique of Historical Reason in Advance.David J. Zoller - 2016 - Idealistic Studies 46 (1):97-118.
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  24.  3
    Moral Theory and Moral Motivation in Dilthey’s Critique of Historical Reason.David J. Zoller - 2016 - Idealistic Studies 46 (1):97-118.
    Dilthey’s moral writings have received scant attention over the years, perhaps due to his apparent tendency toward relativism. This essay offers a unified look at Dilthey’s moral writings in the context of his Kantian-styled “Critique of Historical Reason.” I present the Dilthey of the moral writings as an observer of reason in the spirit of Kant, watching practical reason devolve into error when it applies itself beyond the bounds of possible experience. Drawing on moral writings from across Dilthey’s corpus, I (...)
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