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  1.  4
    On the Rationality of Positive Mysterianism.James N. Anderson - 2018 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 83 (3):291-307.
    In Paradox in Christian Theology I argued that the Christian doctrines of the Trinity and the Incarnation are paradoxical—that is, they appear to involve implicit contradictions—yet Christians can still be rational in affirming and believing those doctrines. Dale Tuggy has characterized my theory of theological paradox as a form of “positive mysterianism” and argues that the theory “faces steep epistemic problems, and is at best a temporarily reasonable but ultimately unsustainable stance.” After summarizing my proposed model for the rational affirmation (...)
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  2.  19
    Spiritual, but Not Religious?: On the Nature of Spirituality and its Relation to Religion.Jeremiah Carey - 2018 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 83 (3):261-269.
    Recent years have seen a rise in those who describe themselves as “spiritual, but not religious”. At a popular level, there has been a lot of debate about this label and what it represents. But philosophers have in general paid little attention to the conceptual issues it raises. What is spirituality, exactly, and how does it relate to religion? Could there be a non-religious spirituality? In this paper, I try to give an outline account of the nature of spirituality and (...)
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  3.  4
    Spirituality, Spiritual Sensibility and Human Growth.David Carr - 2018 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 83 (3):245-260.
    While notions of spirituality, spiritual experience and spiritual development seem much neglected in the literature of modern analytical philosophy, such terminology continues to be current in both common usage and religious contexts. This author has previously taken issue with some recent attempts to develop conceptions of spirituality and spiritual experience as substantially independent of religious attachment. Notwithstanding this, the present paper considers whether such a ‘religiously-untethered’ notion of spirituality, spiritual experience or sensibility might yet be sustainable in terms of two (...)
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  4.  31
    Is Penal Substitution Unjust?William Lane Craig - 2018 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 83 (3):231-244.
    Penal substitution in a theological context is the doctrine that God inflicted upon Christ the suffering which we deserved as the punishment for our sins, as a result of which we no longer deserve punishment. Ever since the time of Faustus Socinus, the doctrine has faced formidable, and some would say insuperable, philosophical challenges. Critics of penal substitution frequently assert that God’s punishing Christ in our place would be an injustice on God’s part. For it is an axiom of retributive (...)
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  5.  6
    Divine Love as a Model for Human Relationships.Ryan W. Davis - 2018 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 83 (3):271-290.
    A common Christian belief is that God loves universally, and that the Christian believer ought, likewise, to love universally. On standard analyses of love, loving universally appears unwise, morally suspect, or even impossible. This essay seeks to understand how the Christian command to love could be both possible and morally desirable. It considers two scriptural examples: Matthew’s trilogy of parables, and the Feast of the Tabernacles in the Gospel of John. I argue that God shows love to humanity through revealed (...)
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  6.  20
    Scott A. Davison: Petitionary Prayer: A Philosophical Investigation. [REVIEW]David M. DiQuattro - 2018 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 83 (3):315-319.
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  7.  1
    Editorial Preface.Ronald L. Hall - 2018 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 83 (3):217-218.
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  8.  8
    The Experiential Problem for Petitionary Prayer.Shieva Kleinschmidt - 2018 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 83 (3):219-229.
    Sometimes people petition God for things through prayer. This is puzzling, because if God always does what is best, it is not clear how these prayers can make a difference to what God does. Difference-Making accounts of petitionary prayer attempt to explain how these prayers can nonetheless influence what God does. I argue that, insofar as one is motivated to endorse a Difference-Making Account because they want to respect widespread intuitions about this feature of petitionary prayer, they should also be (...)
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  9.  6
    Review of Merold Westphal: In Praise of Heteronomy: Making Room for Revelation. [REVIEW]Greg Lynch - 2018 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 83 (3):309-314.
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  10.  1
    Merold Westphal: In Praise of Heteronomy: Making Room for Revelation.Greg Lynch - 2018 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 83 (3):309-314.
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  11.  6
    Stephen T. Davis: After We Die: Theology, Philosophy, and the Question of Life After Death.Lloyd Strickland - 2018 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 83 (3):321-323.
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  12.  10
    Free Will, Grace, and Anti-Pelagianism.Taylor W. Cyr & Matthew T. Flummer - 2018 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 83 (2):183-199.
    Critics of synergism often complain that the view entails Pelagianism, and so, critics think, monergism looks like the only live option. Critics of monergism often claim that the view entails that the blame for human sin ultimately traces to God. Recently, several philosophers have attempted to chart a middle path by offering soteriological accounts which are monergistic but maintain the resistibility of God’s grace. In this paper, we present a challenge to such accounts of the resistibility of grace, namely that (...)
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  13.  2
    Editorial Preface.Ronald L. Hall - 2018 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 83 (2):135-136.
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  14. On the Ultimate Ground of Being.Soufiane Hamri - 2018 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 83 (2):161-168.
    This paper presents a characterization of the ontological dependence relation between an existent and its sustaining cause, which allows to straightforwardly deduce that the being of any dependent existent is grounded on an independent one. Furthermore, an argument is given to the conclusion that there is a unique independent existent, which is therefore the ultimate ground of being.
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  15.  3
    Jill Graper Hernandez: Early Modern Women and the Problem of Evil: Atrocity and Theodicy.Charles Joshua Horn - 2018 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 83 (2):213-216.
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  16.  6
    Brian Davies, O. P.: Thomas Aquinas’s Summa Contra Gentiles: A Guide and Commentary.Daniel W. Houck - 2018 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 83 (2):209-212.
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  17.  7
    On the Doing-Allowing Distinction and the Problem of Evil: A Reply to Daniel Lim.Andrew Ter Ern Loke - 2018 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 83 (2):137-143.
    In his article ‘Doing, allowing, and the problem of evil’ recently published in this journal, Daniel Lim attempts to undermine the following claims with respect to God: the doing-allowing distinction exists and the doing-allowing distinction is morally significant. I argue that Lim’s attempt is unsuccessful, and that his understanding of divine providence has the unacceptable consequence of implying that God is the originator of evil.
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  18.  19
    Mathematics and the Definitions of Religion.Kevin Schilbrack - 2018 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 83 (2):145-160.
    In 2014, I published a proposal for a definition of “religion”. My goal was to offer a definition of this contentious term that would include Buddhism, Daoism, and other non-theistic forms of life widely considered religions in the contemporary world. That proposal suggested necessary and sufficient conditions for treating a form of life as a religious one. It was critiqued as too broad, however, on the grounds that it would include the study of math as a religion. How can one (...)
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  19.  6
    Language, Belief and Plurality: A Contribution to Understanding Religious Diversity.Marciano Adilio Spica - 2018 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 83 (2):169-181.
    My purpose in this paper is to defend the legitimacy of different religious systems by showing that they arise naturally as a consequence of the fact that we are linguistic beings. I will show that we do not need to presume that such belief systems all have something in common, and that even if they did we would most probably be unaware of it. I shall argue, however, that this lack of a common core does not mean that understanding between (...)
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  20.  13
    Access Denied: A Reply to Rickabaugh and McAllister.Christopher M. P. Tomaszewski & John W. Rosenbaum - 2018 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 83 (2):201-207.
    In their recent paper, Brandon Rickabaugh and Derek McAllister object to Paul Moser’s rejection of natural theology on the grounds that Moser is committed to a principle, Seek, which commits Moser to another principle, Access. Access in turn can be rationally motivated for at least some nonbelievers only by the arguments of natural theology. So Moser is in fact committed to the epistemic usefulness of natural theology. In this paper, we show that Seek by itself does not commit one to (...)
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  21.  27
    A Dilemma for the Soul Theory of Personal Identity.Jacob Berger - 2018 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 83 (1):41-55.
    The problem of diachronic personal identity is this: what explains why a person P1 at time T1 is numerically identical with a person P2 at a later time T2, even if they are not at those times qualitatively identical? One traditional explanation is the soul theory, according to which persons persist in virtue of their nonphysical souls. I argue here that this view faces a new and arguably insuperable dilemma: either souls, like physical bodies, change over time, in which case (...)
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  22.  9
    Thickening Description: Towards an Expanded Conception of Philosophy of Religion.Mikel Burley - 2018 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 83 (1):3-19.
    An increasingly common complaint about philosophy of religion—especially, though not exclusively, as it is pursued in the “analytic tradition”—is that its preoccupation with questions of rationality and justification in relation to “theism” has deflected attention from the diversity of forms that religious life takes. Among measures proposed for ameliorating this condition has been the deployment of “thick description” that facilitates more richly contextualized understandings of religious phenomena. Endorsing and elaborating this proposal, I provide an overview of different but related notions (...)
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  23.  17
    Ordinary Morality Does Not Imply Atheism.T. Ryan Byerly - 2018 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 83 (1):85-96.
    Many theist as well as many atheist philosophers have maintained that if God exists, then every instance of undeserved, unwanted suffering ultimately benefits the sufferer. Recently, several authors have argued that this implication of theism conflicts with ordinary morality. I show that these arguments all rest on a common mistake. Defenders of these arguments overlook the role of merely potential instances of suffering in determining our moral obligations toward suffering.
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  24.  10
    Erratum To: Regularities, Laws, and an Exceedingly Modest Premise for a Cosmological Argument.Travis Dumsday - 2018 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 83 (1):125-125.
  25.  12
    Regularities, Laws, and an Exceedingly Modest Premise for a Cosmological Argument.Travis Dumsday - 2018 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 83 (1):111-123.
    In reply to certain cosmological arguments for theism, critics regularly argue that the causal principle ex nihilo nihil fit may be false. Various theistic counter-replies to this challenge have emerged. One type of strategy is to double down on ex nihilo nihil fit. Another, very different strategy of counter-reply is to grant for the sake of argument that the principle is false, while maintaining that sound cosmological arguments can be formulated even with this concession in place. Notably, one can employ (...)
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  26. An Impossible Proof of God.Robert E. Pezet - 2018 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 83 (1):57-83.
    A new version of the ontological argument for the existence of God is outlined and examined. After giving a brief account of some traditional ontological arguments for the existence of God, where their defects are identified, it is explained how this new argument is built upon their foundations and surmounts their defects. In particular, this version uses the resources of impossible worlds to plug the common escape route from standard modal versions of the ontological argument. After outlining the nature of (...)
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  27.  1
    Editorial Preface.Ronald L. Hall - 2018 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 83 (1):1-2.
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  28.  6
    Everlasting Check or Philosophical Fiasco: A Response to Alexander George’s Interpretation of Hume’s ‘Of Miracles’.Robert A. Larmer - 2018 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 83 (1):97-110.
    In his The Everlasting Check: Hume on Miracles, Alexander George claims to provide readers with a single unified interpretation of Hume’s ‘Of Miracles’ that demonstrates Hume’s actual argument is philosophically rich and far more robust than is generally thought. This response argues that George is unsuccessful, ignoring crucial passages and misinterpreting others.
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  29.  32
    Losing the Lost Island.Thomas M. Ward - 2018 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 83 (1):127-134.
    Gaunilo’s Lost Island Objection to Anselm’s Ontological Argument aims to show that if Anselm’s argument can establish the existence of a greatest conceivable being then a very similar argument can establish the existence of a greatest conceivable island. The challenge for the defender of Anselm is to identify the relevant disanalogy between Anselm’s argument and Gaunilo’s, in order to explain why Anselm’s can succeed while Gaunilo’s fails. In this essay I take up this challenge. Reflection on the differences between the (...)
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  30.  1
    The Threat of Logical Inversion and Our Need for Philosophical Attention: From Thought-Expression to Discourse and Discussion.Brandon Yarbrough - 2018 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 83 (1):21-39.
    Thought-expressions are not simply good; instead, they become good for us when they make sense, empower action, and support health. From time to time, we may need to consider the difference between thought-expression and discourse, or thought-expression that really makes sense, and the difference between discourse and discussion, or a discourse-situation that makes genuine agreement or disagreement possible for us. In this essay, I explore a problem that D. Z. Phillips and Randy Ramal have termed “logical inversion,” and I argue (...)
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  31.  4
    Turn Your Gaze Upward! Emotions, Concerns, and Regulatory Strategies in Kierkegaard’s Christian Discourses.Paul Carron - 2018 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-21.
    This essay argues that there are concrete emotion regulation practices described, but not developed, in Kierkegaard’s Christian Discourses. These practices—such as attentiveness to emotion, attentional deployment, and cognitive reappraisal—help the reader to regulate her emotions, to get rid of negative, unwanted emotions such as worry, and to cultivate and nourish positive emotions such as faith, gratitude, and trust. An examination of the Discourses also expose Kierkegaard’s understanding of the emotions; his view is akin to a perceptual theory of the emotions (...)
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  32.  22
    Is Supernatural Belief Unreliably Formed.Hans Van Eyghen - 2018 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-24.
    I criticize 5 arguments for the conclusion that religious belief is unreliably formed and hence epistemically tainted. The arguments draw on scientific evidence from Cognitive Science of Religion. They differ considerably as to why the evidence points to unreliability. Two arguments conclude to unreliability because religious belief is shaped by evolutionary pressures; another argument states that the mechanism responsible for religious belief produces many false god-beliefs; a similar argument claims that the mechanism produces incompatible god-beliefs; and a final argument states (...)
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