Year:

Forthcoming articles
  1.  13
    Dennis Plaisted (forthcoming). On Justifying One’s Acceptance of Divine Command Theory. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-20.
    It has been alleged against divine command theory that we cannot justify our acceptance of it without giving it up. For if we provide moral reasons for our acceptance of God’s commands, then those reasons, and not God’s commands, must be our ultimate moral standard. Kai Nielsen has offered the most forceful version of this objection in his book, Ethics Without God. My principal aim is to show that Nielsen’s charge does not succeed. His argument crucially relies upon the assumption (...)
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  2.  14
    Jonathan Rutledge (forthcoming). Skeptical Theism, Moral Skepticism, and Epistemic Propriety. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-10.
    Respondents to the argument from evil who follow Michael Bergmann’s development of skeptical theism hold that our failure to determine God’s reasons for permitting evil does not disconfirm theism at all. They claim that such a thesis follows from the very plausible claim that we have no good reason to think our access to the realm of value is representative of the full realm of value. There are two interpretations of ST’s strength, the stronger of which leads skeptical theists into (...)
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  3.  1
    Jonathan Curtis Rutledge (forthcoming). The Parent Analogy: A Reassessment. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-10.
    According to the parent analogy, as a caretaker’s goodness, ability and intelligence increase, the likelihood that the caretaker will make arrangements for the attainment of future goods that are unnoticed or underappreciated by their dependents also increases. Consequently, if this analogy accurately represents our relationship to God, then we should expect to find many instances of inscrutable evil in the world. This argument in support of skeptical theism has recently been criticized by Dougherty. I argue that Dougherty’s argument is incomplete, (...)
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  4.  1
    Thomas Atkinson (forthcoming). Acquaintance and the Sublime: An Alternative Account of Theistic Sublime Experience. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-19.
    In this paper I argue that when one has an epiphany of the form ‘God is F’ upon having a sublime experience one can be accurately described as being acquainted with the fact that God is F as opposed to inferring that God is F from the experience at hand. To argue for this, I will, first, outline what a sublime experience is, in general, before outlining what a theistic sublime experience is in particular. Second, I will outline two ways (...)
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  5.  3
    Hanoch Ben-Pazi (forthcoming). Messianism’s Contribution to Political Philosophy: Peace and War in Levinas’s Totality and Infinity. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-23.
    This article examines the impact of messianic thought on political philosophy in the theory of philosopher Emmanuel Levinas. Levinas’s work enables us to consider the political not only in terms of contemplation of the tension between the political and the ethical and of the ethical limits of politics but as an attempt to create ethical political thought. Discussion of the tension between the political and the ethical intensifies in wartime and in the context of militaristic thinking. At the same time, (...)
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  6.  4
    Jacob Berger (forthcoming). A Dilemma for the Soul Theory of Personal Identity. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-15.
    The problem of diachronic personal identity is this: what explains why a person P1 at time T1 is numerically identical with a person P2 at a later time T2, even if they are not at those times qualitatively identical? One traditional explanation is the soul theory, according to which persons persist in virtue of their nonphysical souls. I argue here that this view faces a new and arguably insuperable dilemma: either souls, like physical bodies, change over time, in which case (...)
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  7. Mikel Burley (forthcoming). Thickening Description: Towards an Expanded Conception of Philosophy of Religion. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-17.
    An increasingly common complaint about philosophy of religion—especially, though not exclusively, as it is pursued in the “analytic tradition”—is that its preoccupation with questions of rationality and justification in relation to “theism” has deflected attention from the diversity of forms that religious life takes. Among measures proposed for ameliorating this condition has been the deployment of “thick description” that facilitates more richly contextualized understandings of religious phenomena. Endorsing and elaborating this proposal, I provide an overview of different but related notions (...)
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  8.  22
    Aaran Burns (forthcoming). A Phenomenal Conservative Perspective on Religious Experience. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-15.
    Can religious experience justify belief in God? We best approach this question by splitting it in two: Do religious experiences give their subjects any justification for believing that there is a God of the kind they experience? And Does testimony about such experiences provides any justification for believing that there is a God for those who are not the subject of the experience? The most popular affirmative answers trace back to the work of Richard Swinburne, who appeals to the Principle (...)
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  9.  5
    T. Ryan Byerly (forthcoming). Ordinary Morality Does Not Imply Atheism. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-12.
    Many theist as well as many atheist philosophers have maintained that if God exists, then every instance of undeserved, unwanted suffering ultimately benefits the sufferer. Recently, several authors have argued that this implication of theism conflicts with ordinary morality. I show that these arguments all rest on a common mistake. Defenders of these arguments overlook the role of merely potential instances of suffering in determining our moral obligations toward suffering.
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  10.  4
    Travis Dumsday (forthcoming). Erratum To: Regularities, Laws, and an Exceedingly Modest Premise for a Cosmological Argument. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-1.
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  11.  5
    Travis Dumsday (forthcoming). Regularities, Laws, and an Exceedingly Modest Premise for a Cosmological Argument. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-13.
    In reply to certain cosmological arguments for theism, critics regularly argue that the causal principle ex nihilo nihil fit may be false. Various theistic counter-replies to this challenge have emerged. One type of strategy is to double down on ex nihilo nihil fit. Another, very different strategy of counter-reply is to grant for the sake of argument that the principle is false, while maintaining that sound cosmological arguments can be formulated even with this concession in place. Notably, one can employ (...)
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  12.  44
    Robert E. Pezet (forthcoming). An Impossible Proof of God. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-27.
    A new version of the ontological argument for the existence of God is outlined and examined. After giving a brief account of some traditional ontological arguments for the existence of God, where their defects are identified, it is explained how this new argument is built upon their foundations and surmounts their defects. In particular, this version uses the resources of impossible worlds to plug the common escape route from standard modal versions of the ontological argument. After outlining the nature of (...)
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  13.  43
    A. Harvevany (forthcoming). The Ethics of Belief and Two Conceptions of Christian Faith. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion.
    This article deals with two types of Christian faith in the light of the challenges posed by the ethics of belief. It is proposed that the difficulties with Clifford’s formulation of that ethic can best be handled if the ethic is interpreted in terms of role-specific intellectual integrity. But the ethic still poses issues for the traditional interpretation of Christian faith when it is conceived as a series of discrete but related propositions, especially historical propositions. For as so conceived, the (...)
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  14.  12
    Erkki Vesa Rope Kojonen (forthcoming). Methodological Naturalism and the Truth Seeking Objection. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-21.
    Methodological naturalism, the exclusion of the supernatural from the natural sciences, has drawn critique from both proponents of Intelligent Design and some philosophical naturalists who argue that the methods of science can also be used to evaluate supernatural claims. One principal objection to methodological naturalism has been what I call the truth seeking objection. In this article I develop an understanding of methodological naturalism capable of answering the truth seeking objection. I further also argue that methodological naturalism as a convention (...)
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  15.  1
    Robert A. Larmer (forthcoming). Everlasting Check or Philosophical Fiasco: A Response to Alexander George’s Interpretation of Hume’s ‘Of Miracles’. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-14.
    In his The Everlasting Check: Hume on Miracles, Alexander George claims to provide readers with a single unified interpretation of Hume’s ‘Of Miracles’ that demonstrates Hume’s actual argument is philosophically rich and far more robust than is generally thought. This response argues that George is unsuccessful, ignoring crucial passages and misinterpreting others.
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  16.  16
    Raphael Lataster & Herman Philipse (forthcoming). The Problem of Polytheisms: A Serious Challenge to Theism. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-14.
    Theistic and analytic philosophers of religion typically privilege classical theism and monotheism by ignoring or underestimating the great threat of polytheism. We develop an argument from infinitely many alternatives, which decisively demonstrates that if a monotheistic or polytheistic god-model obtains, it will almost certainly be polytheistic. Probabilistic calculations are performed in order to illustrate the difficulties faced by the monotheistic proponent. After considering possible objections, such as whether there should be limits placed on how many possible god-models could obtain, we (...)
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  17.  2
    Samuel Lebens (forthcoming). Is There a Primordial Torah? International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-21.
    Is Orthodox Judaism committed to the existence of a Torah that pre-existed the world? This paper argues that Orthodoxy is so committed unless it can find compelling philosophical or theological reasons to reject the possibility of such an entity, and then to re-interpret allegorically all of the texts that speak of such a Torah. Providing an ontology of primordial texts, I argue that no compelling reason can be found to deny the existence of the primordial Torah.
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  18.  25
    Daniel Lim (forthcoming). Doing, Allowing, and the Problem of Evil. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-17.
    Many assume that the best, and perhaps only, way to address the so-called Problem of Evil is to claim that God does not do evil, but that God merely allows evil. This assumption depends on two claims: the doing-allowing distinction exists and the doing-allowing distinction is morally significant. In this paper I try to undermine both of these claims. Against I argue that some of the most influential analyses of the doing-allowing distinction face grave difficulties and that these difficulties are (...)
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  19.  1
    Tracy Llanera (forthcoming). Richard Rorty and the Concept of Redemption. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-16.
    It is curious why a secular pragmatist like Richard Rorty would capitalize on the religiously-laden concept of redemption in his recent writings. But more than being an intriguing idea in his later work, this essay argues that redemption plays a key role in the historical development of Rorty’s thought. It begins by exploring the paradoxical status of redemption in Rorty’s oeuvre. It then investigates an overlooked debate between Rorty, Dreyfus and Taylor that first endorses the concept. It then contrasts Rorty’s (...)
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  20.  7
    David Robertson RemB Edwards, René F. Brabander Terence Penelhudem & Henry Berne (forthcoming). Books in Review. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion.
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  21.  4
    Brandon L. Rickabaugh & Derek L. McAllister (forthcoming). Who You Could Have Known: Divine Hiddenness, Epistemic Counterfactuals, and the Recalcitrant Nature of Natural Theology. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-12.
    We argue there is a deep conflict in Paul Moser’s work on divine hiddenness. Moser’s treatment of DH adopts a thesis we call SEEK: DH often results from failing to seek God on His terms. One way in which people err, according to Moser, is by trusting arguments of traditional natural theology to lead to filial knowledge of God. We argue that Moser’s SEEK thesis commits him to the counterfactual ACCESS: had the atheist sought after God in harmony with how (...)
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  22. Anne Leona Cesarine Runehov (forthcoming). Why Evil Won't Go Away: A Philosophical Analysis of the Relationship Between Religions, Ideologies and Evil. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion.
     
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  23. Mark Douglas Saward (forthcoming). The Problem of Invoking Infinite Polytheisms: A Response to Raphael Lataster and Herman Philipse. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-10.
    Raphael Lataster and Herman Philipse present an argument which they think decisively demonstrates polytheism over monotheism, if theism is assumed. Far from being decisive, the argument depends on very controversial and likely false assumptions about how to treat infinities in probability. Moreover, these problems are well known. Here, we focus on three objections. First, the authors rely on both countable additivity and the Principle of Indifference, which contradict each other. Second, the authors rely on a particular way of dividing up (...)
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  24.  6
    John L. Schellenberg (forthcoming). A Modest Solution to the Problem of Religious Disagreement. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-16.
    In this paper I develop a new recipe for solving the problem of religious disagreement suggested by the injunction to cultivate intellectual humility conjoined with awareness of human immaturity in deep time. The ingredients brought to the table include such things as noticing the full breadth and texture of the religious propositional field, observing the previously hidden areas of agreement this exposes, making a differential judgment of importance in relation to religious propositions, applying the concept of a position, and finding (...)
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  25.  11
    Shanta Ratnayaka Stephen Skousgaard, J. Buckley John, Richard Hogan Robert Greenwood & S. McGinnis Robert (forthcoming). Books in Review. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion.
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  26.  16
    Thomas M. Ward (forthcoming). Losing the Lost Island. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-8.
    Gaunilo’s Lost Island Objection to Anselm’s Ontological Argument aims to show that if Anselm’s argument can establish the existence of a greatest conceivable being then a very similar argument can establish the existence of a greatest conceivable island. The challenge for the defender of Anselm is to identify the relevant disanalogy between Anselm’s argument and Gaunilo’s, in order to explain why Anselm’s can succeed while Gaunilo’s fails. In this essay I take up this challenge. Reflection on the differences between the (...)
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  27. Brandon Yarbrough (forthcoming). The Threat of Logical Inversion and Our Need for Philosophical Attention: From Thought-Expression to Discourse and Discussion. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-19.
    Thought-expressions are not simply good; instead, they become good for us when they make sense, empower action, and support health. From time to time, we may need to consider the difference between thought-expression and discourse, or thought-expression that really makes sense, and the difference between discourse and discussion, or a discourse-situation that makes genuine agreement or disagreement possible for us. In this essay, I explore a problem that D. Z. Phillips and Randy Ramal have termed “logical inversion,” and I argue (...)
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