Year:

  1.  5
    Philosophy in the (Gender and the Law) Classroom.Laura D'Olimpio - 2017 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 38 (1):1-16.
    This article reflects on the ‘Philosophy and Gender’ project, which introduced the pedagogical technique known as the ‘Community of Inquiry’ into an undergraduate Gender and the Law course at the University of Western Australia. The Community of Inquiry is a pedagogy developed by Matthew Lipman in the discipline of Philosophy that facilitates collaborative and democratic philosophical thinking in the context of teaching philosophy in schools. Our project was to see if this pedagogy could advance two objectives in Gender and the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Matthew Lipman's Model Theory of the Community of Inquiry.Darryl M. De Marzio - 2017 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 38 (1):37-46.
    In an earlier publication, titled, “What Happens in Philosophical Texts,”1 I present what I refer to as Matthew Lipman’s model theory of the philosophical text. I argue there that the distinctive form of Lipman’s own philosophical novels—the curricular flagship of the Philosophy for Children program—lies in how they perform a modeling function, in the sense of being both a model of and a model for philosophical thinking. In addition, I attempt to locate through this theoretical rendering the place that Lipman’s (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Power, Pedagogy and the "Women Problem": Ameliorating Philosophy.Hilkje Charlotte Haenel - 2017 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 38 (1):17-28.
    Being a member of a minority group makes it harder to succeed in academic philosophy. Research suggests that students from underrepresented groups have a hard time in academic philosophy and often drop out instead of pursuing a career in philosophy, despite having the potential to become excellent philosophers. In this paper, I will argue that there is a specific way of thinking about traditional conceptual analysis within analytic philosophy that marginalizes underrepresented groups. This has to do with what kinds of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  41
    Teaching Philosophy Through Paintings: A Museum Workshop.Savvas Ioannou, Kypros Georgiou & Ourania Maria Ventista - 2017 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 38 (1):62-83.
    There is wide research about the Philosophy for/with Children program. However, there is not any known attempt to investigate how a philosophical discussion can be implemented through a museum workshop. The present research aims to discuss aesthetic and epistemological issues with primary school children through a temporary art exhibition in a museum in Cyprus. Certainly, paintings have been used successfully to connect philosophical topics with the experiences of the children. We suggest, though, that this is not as innovative as the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Engaging Science, Artistically.Vadim Keyser - 2017 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 38 (1):47-61.
    In this discussion I show that philosophy of science concepts, especially where examples and thought experiments are limiting, can be enriched with artistic examples. I argue that artistic examples show abstract components and relations that can then be used to engage with philosophical concepts. First, I discuss a useful representational model for thinking about the process of science as analogous to the process of art. I set up philosophy of science as not only open, but also closely connected to art (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Socratic Aporia in the Classroom and the Development of Resilience.Stephen Kekoa Miller - 2017 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 38 (1):29-36.
    I’d like to talk about the value of unlearning, of undoing, of disruption. Especially in the early aporetic dialogues of Plato, Socrates famously takes his interlocutors on a journey that at least initially appears to end in failure: at the dialogue’s conclusion, there seems to be no answer to the questions that inspired the conversation. There has been a lot of recent debate about the so-called Socratic method and accusations that it may be deflating, resulting in less, rather than more (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Community of Inquiry and Underserved Youth Engagement: A Reflective Account of Philosophy and Method.Darren Garside & Karen J. Myskiw - 2017 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 37 (2):13-25.
    Braidotti, when considering her early career, poses the following questions: How do we do justice to experiences that have no recognition in the language and practice of conventional wisdom, common sense and reasonableness? What is the appropriate way to express silences and missing voices? In this paper we expand on the short answer “Art”, including visual arts, spoken word, and poetry, dancing and tableau, by elaborating upon one aspect - processes of inquiry that at their heart value recognition and voice. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Art & Dialogue: An Experiment in Pre-K Philosophy.Erik Kenyon & Diane Terorde-Doyle - 2017 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 37 (2):26-35.
    Early educators are in a bind. Teacher education programs are calling on them more and more to help students practice critical thinking and develop intellectual character ; yet school funding depends on meeting Common Core standards, which do not explicitly assess critical thinking until the high-school level. Add to that an over-engineered content curriculum, and thinking becomes a luxury that is quickly lost amid more immediate concerns. As a result, we are raising a generation of “excellent sheep” who flourish amid (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Review of “Academic Philosophy: An Uncommonly Creative, Imaginative and Challenging Curriculum”. [REVIEW]Richard Morehouse - 2017 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 37 (2):41-45.
    This series of books and accompanying guides as a group are labeled “Academic Philosophy: and Uncommonly Creative, Imaginative & Challenging Curriculum” in the promotional brochure. Sharon Kaye is the author of the series but there are two different illustrators. Jordon Novak illustrates Question Mark, Theo Rising, and Mark and Theo make their case and Christopher Tice illustrates the rest of the series. The first three sets of teacher materials are labeled Teacher Manual, while the last three sets of teacher materials (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. The Classroom as a Work of Art.Felix Garcia Moriyon - 2017 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 37 (2):1-12.
    The “Philosophy for Children” program has different goals, one of them being to foster creative thinking among students. The educational approach of the program is designed to transform the classroom into an innovative and philosophical environment that encourages students to develop creative thinking. At the beginning of this article, I discuss a concept of art as a creative activity that requires strong active involvement by the person who creates the work of art as well as the person who perceives, observes (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Deconstructing the Artistic Impulse Through an Examination of David Wiesner’s Art and Max.Wendy C. Turgeon - 2017 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 37 (2):36-40.
    In Art and Max1 David Wiesner explores the tools and processes of artistic creation. This book does so in an unusually self-referential way as the very illustrations themselves are the subject focus for deconstructing and reconstructing the meaning of art. While this is a picture book with simple text and most likely aimed at very young children, we can find here a rich mine of ideas for “children of all ages,” any of us who are puzzled by the meaning of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues